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Introduction - Organ Tree

Lyfe

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For our first dev blog entry we decided to introduce you to the organ-tree which we already described in our design document.

If you haven't read you can find it in the description of our project here.

 

So about that organ-tree:

Organ-Tree_1.thumb.png.f9706ea1c4f4fff7cacf9e9f5bff5e67.png

This is it: The tool you use during the creature stage to unlock or as it will be called ingame "evolve" your organs/skin types/body parts.

Now, this is still a very rough outline but I think the intention is clear.

One important design decision we made is to split it into three categories: Aquatic, Terrestrial and Both, with you starting off mostly in the aquatic branch, since your life (or lyfe if you will) as a complex creature will start off in the beautiful and mysterious depths of the ocean.

 

Parts from the aquatic part of the tree might be useless on land or even harm you and vice versa. For example you don't want to leave the water with gills on your creature because you will run out of oxygen very quickly. This doesn't apply to all parts, though. For aquatic hands for example it is more of a design choice (We might add gameplay functionalities later like aquatic hands help with swimming but aren't good for attacking while with some hands developed from the terrestrial branch you can claw at your rivals or prey).

 

You might have noticed that every set of organs has one base set and four versions deriving from it with numbers at the end. Each new version will be a new model/have a new design and slightly different stats. We are not 100% sure if we can keep the 4 stages of each organ but we will try. Because you know what they say: "Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss you will end in the vacuum of space and die alone."

 

What's next? The skin types. This is something where we really want to make use of the advanced technology we have compared to that from Spore almost ten years ago. Skin might not have an effect on the gameplay (yet, we're planning something for our nice-to-haves) but will make your creature look fantastic. The plan was keep it a small number of types but make them well differentiated.

 

Eyes: Withou eyes you won't be able to see anything, pretty straight forward, BUT: How good your eyes are determines how well you see objects at a distance/how far you can see. As a little bonus we also added a branch that grants you nightvision if you plan on making a nocturnal creature.

 

Finally: The brain. This is an indicator for your prograss in the creature stage. You start off with the first and most basic brain. You have to unlock all three upgrades to be able to enter the next stage which we will undoubtedly discuss at some point in this blog.



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Sounds pretty cool, I've always thought someone should have another go at the Spore concept but try to do a bit better and apply some more advanced techniques! :)

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1 minute ago, jbadams said:

Sounds pretty cool, I've always thought someone should have another go at the Spore concept but try to do a bit better and apply some more advanced techniques! :)

Thanks for the reply. We will definitly do our best and some more. :)

What do you mean with 'advanced techniques'? With regard to what Spore did? Just asking so we know what people whant from this.

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Yeah, I didn't have anything particular in mind, just an improvement on Spore, which was interesting enough, but for me at least never quite lived up to its promise. :)

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7 hours ago, jbadams said:

Yeah, I didn't have anything particular in mind, just an improvement on Spore, which was interesting enough, but for me at least never quite lived up to its promise. :)

We want to keep our development as transparent as possible to not generate unnecessary hype the game can't live up to. 

 

Although we are still a small team now we work on expanding to get the necessary resources to make this vision come true. And with the advancement in game engines since Spore we are fairly optimistic we will improve on a lot of its shortcomings. 

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the concepts around the creatures eyes sounds cool.  So then will the eyes you use for your creature directly affect your field of view in some way?

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1 hour ago, Awoken said:

the concepts around the creatures eyes sounds cool.  So then will the eyes you use for your creature directly affect your field of view in some way?

It will. 

Let's say you got your first set of eyes on your creature. With those it can see about 20m (or something, game play tests will tell). After you evolve (unlock)  the second set you also have to add them to your creature to benefit from their increased stats. 

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23 hours ago, Lyfe said:

What do you mean with 'advanced techniques'? With regard to what Spore did?

One of the weird things about Spore is that they showed up to E3 a couple of years before release, and showed off a build with all sorts of emergent behaviour (creatures gait was derived from the shape of it's spine and position of joints, that sort of thing). By the time release rolled around, they'd stripped out almost all of that in favour of the final "plug and play" approach where you just attached pieces for "+1 speed".

Needless to say, that was pretty disappointing. Though not surprising - the original vision was very ambitious, and the most ambitious features usually get cut when ship time comes knocking.

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1 minute ago, swiftcoder said:

One of the weird things about Spore is that they showed up to E3 a couple of years before release, and showed off a build with all sorts of emergent behaviour (creatures gait was derived from the shape of it's spine and position of joints, that sort of thing). By the time release rolled around, they'd stripped out almost all of that in favour of the final "plug and play" approach where you just attached pieces for "+1 speed".

Needless to say, that was pretty disappointing. Though not surprising - the original vision was very ambitious, and the most ambitious features usually get cut when ship time comes knocking.

Ok,ok. I get what you mean.

So far we plan on having the movement calculated from your creature's bodystructure BUT also add different types of legs that give you +1 speed (just to give an example; maybe we might also just restrict that to the 'campaign') because it makes sense from a gameplay point of view.  Just to answer that point because it's something important to me, too.

 

About removing amitious features:

We are not a company. We don't have deadlines. This has it's ups and downs. For one we are a small team doing this because we share a common vision of what could be which might slow down development. On the other hand we have all the time to publish it and can stay faithful to that vision.

We just want to make the best version of this game we can.

I want to promise a lot but know I can't.

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