Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    10
  • comments
    7
  • views
    1066


0 Comments


Recommended Comments

There are no comments to display.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • Blog Entries

  • Similar Content

    • By ryt
      Usually when I think of interfaces, or when I read about them, I see them as something as they are made in C#. There is a keyword for it and it's used for classes that can not be instantiated, they have to be inherited. In C++ they can be made by making a member function a pure virtual function, with = 0, where they are called abstract classes.
      When I was coding with DirectX I used "DirectX interfaces". Actually if I remember correctly DirectX uses them for almost everything. Some example would be ID3D11Buffer.
      I know that it's a COM interface though I don't know much about it.
      I never inherited them, though maybe someone would expect this because they are interfaces. I always used them as "real" objects, I would get their pointer through some function like CreateBuffer() or some similar method.
      What confuses me is why they are "called" interfaces and have an "I" in front? Are they maybe totally different from interfaces that I described, like C# interfaces, and have some other intended use?
    • By sidbhati32
      How do I detect the mouse event of moving my mouse left or right and wheel up or down?
      I have used Get_X_LParam for mouse movement and WParam for wheel movement.
      Like DWORD x = HIWORD(wParam) but both of these events return continuous values.

      for eg. if(x>0)
      {
      //do this
      }

      else
      {
      //do this
      }

      the Wparam only returns the same value every time even if I am moving my wheel downwards. Same with Get_X_LParam
       
    • By ryt
      I took a look at this video to see the difference between static and dynamic linking. Basically the author uses __declspec(dllexport) to export a function.
      How could we also export classes from the same file? Do we need to put the same keyword before class definition or maybe something else?
    • By ryt
      Consider the following classes and pInt declaration:
      class A { ... }; class B : public A { void function() { int A::*pInt; // use pInt } }; Where does pInt belongs, is it local to B::function() or it's a member of A?
    • By CommanderLake
      I've been experimenting with my own n-body simulation for some time and I recently discovered how to optimize it for efficient multithreading and vectorization with the Intel compiler. It did exactly the same thing after making it multithreaded and scaled very well on my ancient i7 3820 (4.3GHz). Then I changed the interleaved xy coordinates to separate arrays for x and y to eliminate the strided loads to improve AVX scaling and copy the coordinates to an interleaved array for OpenTK to render as points. Now the physics is all wrong, the points form clumps that interact with each other but they are unusually dense and accelerate faster than they decelerate causing the clumps to randomly fly off into the distance and after several seconds I get a NaN where 2 points somehow occupy exactly the same x and y float coordinates. This is the C++ DLL:
      #include "PPC.h" #include <thread> static const float G = 0.0000001F; const int count = 4096; __declspec(align(64)) float pointsx[count]; __declspec(align(64)) float pointsy[count]; void SetData(float* x, float* y){ memcpy(pointsx, x, count * sizeof(float)); memcpy(pointsy, y, count * sizeof(float)); } void Compute(float* points, float* velx, float* vely, long pcount, float aspect, float zoom) { #pragma omp parallel for for (auto i = 0; i < count; ++i) { auto forcex = 0.0F; auto forcey = 0.0F; for (auto j = 0; j < count; ++j) { if(j == i)continue; const auto distx = pointsx[i] - pointsx[j]; const auto disty = pointsy[i] - pointsy[j]; //if(px != px) continue; //most efficient way to avoid a NaN failure const auto force = G / (distx * distx + disty * disty); forcex += distx * force; forcey += disty * force; } pointsx[i] += velx[i] -= forcex; pointsy[i] += vely[i] -= forcey; if (zoom != 1) { points[i * 2] = pointsx[i] * zoom / aspect; points[i * 2 + 1] = pointsy[i] * zoom; } else { points[i * 2] = pointsx[i] / aspect; points[i * 2 + 1] = pointsy[i]; } /*points[i * 2] = pointsx[i]; points[i * 2 + 1] = pointsy[i];*/ } } This is the relevant part of the C# OpenTK GameWindow:
      private void PhysicsLoop(){ while(true){ if(stop){ for(var i = 0; i < pcount; ++i) { velx[i] = vely[i] = 0F; } } if(reset){ reset = false; var r = new Random(); for(var i = 0; i < Startcount; ++i){ do{ pointsx[i] = (float)(r.NextDouble()*2.0F - 1.0F); pointsy[i] = (float)(r.NextDouble()*2.0F - 1.0F); } while(pointsx[i]*pointsx[i] + pointsy[i]*pointsy[i] > 1.0F); velx[i] = vely[i] = 0.0F; } NativeMethods.SetData(pointsx, pointsy); pcount = Startcount; buffersize = (IntPtr)(pcount*8); } are.WaitOne(); NativeMethods.Compute(points0, velx, vely, pcount, aspect, zoom); var pointstemp = points0; points0 = points1; points1 = pointstemp; are1.Set(); } } protected override void OnRenderFrame(FrameEventArgs e){ GL.Clear(ClearBufferMask.ColorBufferBit); GL.EnableVertexAttribArray(0); GL.BindBuffer(BufferTarget.ArrayBuffer, vbo); mre1.Wait(); are1.WaitOne(); GL.BufferData(BufferTarget.ArrayBuffer, buffersize, points1, BufferUsageHint.StaticDraw); are.Set(); GL.VertexAttribPointer(0, 2, VertexAttribPointerType.Float, false, 0, 0); GL.DrawArrays(PrimitiveType.Points, 0, pcount); GL.DisableVertexAttribArray(0); SwapBuffers(); } These are the array declarations:
      private const int Startcount = 4096; private readonly float[] pointsx = new float[Startcount]; private readonly float[] pointsy = new float[Startcount]; private float[] points0 = new float[Startcount*2]; private float[] points1 = new float[Startcount*2]; private readonly float[] velx = new float[Startcount]; private readonly float[] vely = new float[Startcount];  
      Edit 0: It seems that adding 3 zeros to G increases the accuracy of the simulation but I'm at a loss as to why its different without interleaved coordinates. Edit 1: I somehow achieved an 8.3x performance increase with AVX over scalar with the new code above!
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!