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Financial Stability

BewitchingGames

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I wanna thank everyone who helped me out with my last question, but now I got something possibly bigger than the last one. I just wanna know, how do you guys earn money while making your games to? Do you work a full time job and work on the game at the same time? Cause I gotta say, my full time job is awful, leaving me pretty much drained to the point I really can't do much of anything. So, I've been trying to figure out ways to earn money and work on a game at the same time. Cause I have a school debt to pay off, and now a car payment, so I can't not be working. I can't work at my current job any more for personal reasons. So I'm hoping I can get the help I'm looking for.



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Don't quit your job, just don't.

As a artist who tries to help a lot of indie developers I can tell you a lot of shocking stories of developers who gambled on game development.

I've seen how a new developer who just taped into his savings tell me my indie prices is too low, only for the same developer to steal from me months latter when he could no longer pay.

The strangest case was a indie developer who hired me under my professional portfolio, tried to sue me for the failure of his game. The only reason it didn't even reach court was because he had approved every model, and I had warned him every time not to use AAA models in a indie game. In the end I bought my models back out of pity, he did spend his life savings on the game.

 

Making games while working a job is how I do it. But I am only a hobby game developer and it took me 10 years before I was able to publish a game that earned profit.

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1 hour ago, Scouting Ninja said:

Don't quit your job, just don't.

As a artist who tries to help a lot of indie developers I can tell you a lot of shocking stories of developers who gambled on game development.

I've seen how a new developer who just taped into his savings tell me my indie prices is too low, only for the same developer to steal from me months latter when he could no longer pay.

The strangest case was a indie developer who hired me under my professional portfolio, tried to sue me for the failure of his game. The only reason it didn't even reach court was because he had approved every model, and I had warned him every time not to use AAA models in a indie game. In the end I bought my models back out of pity, he did spend his life savings on the game.

 

Making games while working a job is how I do it. But I am only a hobby game developer and it took me 10 years before I was able to publish a game that earned profit.

Oh no I wasn't. I was just trying to find other ways of making money while working on an indie game. As much as I hate my job, I know I can't quit, your two stories alone are proof enough on how risky the idea of gambling on game development is.

Right now, I'm just trying to find a new job, other ways to earn money, or advice on the whole thing... whichever comes first really.

Also, still new to the field, but exactly how would it be your fault for the failure of his game?

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1 hour ago, BewitchingGames said:

but exactly how would it be your fault for the failure of his game?

Short: AAA 3D models have huge amount of polygons and texture setups. It takes a average of 5 people(some times 10-12) to get a character into a game.

Longer:

Spoiler

 

For example a AAA model will have 2-3 normal maps per body part, 2-4 albedo maps and 2-4 PBR specular sets. Polycount is often  +/- 150 000 to Main character to +/- 60 000 , cinematic models is > 200 000. The rig I provide standard is 314 bones for the capture rig and the game output model ranges from 24-72 bones depending on main character or enemy.

The problem with a mesh that has that much detail, is that it takes a lot of work to animate. He thought he could just buy some motion capture software (spending almost all of his budget) and do it himself; what takes a team of trained professionals with years of experience to do.

He then claimed it was my fault the model was complex, except I had proof that I warned him every time he asked for a model to be made.

I couldn't refund him as he had used the models in his game and published it. So I had to buy back the models for the same price but kept the deposits. 

 

Now I have a rule where I don't make complex models for anyone who can't prove they have made a game before.

 

2 hours ago, BewitchingGames said:

. I was just trying to find other ways of making money while working on an indie game.

If you can hang on till you have made a demo, crowdfunding is a option. I know some developers sell the tools they make for there games on the Unity asset store.

Mostly I see developers starting with extremely small and cheap games, selling them to earn money for larger and larger projects. This is also a good approach because it helps refine skills.

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Personally I have stockpiled my vast fortune through investment and other means, this allows me to spend my time programming games and anything I find fun.

In terms of financial stability, gamedev is a very poor choice in most cases imo. Most of the poor saps who rely on it for income do it because it combines their interest with the ability to make some money. There are far more sensible choices if you want to 'reach Hampstead'.

If I was going to do it all again, I'd be quite tempted to study law. I find it interesting and top lawyers are often stupidly overpaid. If you have no skills, there is always good money to be made at the docks, plumbers are always in demand, and crime can be very lucrative.

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