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SFX The Sound Design of the Online Multiplayer game: Exocorps

Olivier Girardot

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I created this youtube channel to share with you different aspects of sound design. I talk about sound effects in films, I share some of my work, and I give tips and tutorials on how to make specific sounds.

My first concern is about the length of the video which exceeds 10 minutes. On the other hand I could have gone into much more details, like explaining how I created some of these sounds.



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