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Just now, Olivier Girardot said:

Haha, I don't think so, but thank you so much ! 😀

You're extremely talented, no reason to down play it! ;)   I still have your site bookmarked for future. :D 

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    • By Mapet
      Hi, I started implementing 2D board game. I have concept of how to write rules, controlls etc, but i dont want to write another all-in-app. So i decided to do it "right". I divided my code into reuseable modules - ResourceManager, Renderer, Core, Math (for now). All modules use SDL2.
      ResourceManager(RM) - loads textures, audio etc without duplicating them in memory. Resources are gathered in TextureResource, AudioResource (...) objects, handled by std::shared_ptr. For textures I have prepared Texture class that wraps SDL_Texture and I RM serves this Texture objs for Core module.
      Core - The main game module, contains game loop, gameobject / component implementation and event handling. Core requests for data from RM and sends them to right components.
      Renderer - Creates window and knows about render range (in core represented by camera). Takes info about texture, position, rotation and scale to render images (just this for now).
      Its time for my questions:
      is this architecture good? After I end this board game I want to extend renderer module for example for rendering 3D objects.  Loading resources while ingame is good idea? I mean single textures, models, sounds etc.  As I said, for handling resources I am using shared_ptr, is it good cleaning cache every (for example) 3 minutes? By cleaning i mean removing not used resources (counter =1). And the hardest thing for me right now - take a look at this flow: Core create a T1 token Component Renderer2D is connected to T1. Core requests a texture /textures/T1.png from RM. RM checks if /textures/T1.png is in map, if not, loads it. RM returns a std::shared_ptr<Texture> to Core. Core assign texture to T1 Renderer2D component.
      Now i want to pass this object to renderer. But I wont pass all gameObjects and checks which have renderer2D component (i also cant, because only Core know what is gameObject and component). So i had an idea: I can create Renderable interface (in Renderer module) and inherit from it in the renderer2D component. Renderable will contain only pointers to position data. Now i am able to pass renderer2D component pointer to Renderer and register it.

      Is this good way to handle this? Or im overcomplicating things? If point above is right I had last question - registering object in Renderer module. I dont want to iterate over all objects and check if I can render them (if they are in render range). I wanted to place them in "buckets" of - for example - screen size. Now calculating collisions should be faster - i would do this only for objects in adjacent buckets. But for 2D game i have to render objects in correct order using Z index. Objects have to be placed in correct bucket first, then sorted by Z in range of bucket. But now i have problem with unregistering objects from Renderer module.
      I think I got lost somewhere in this place... Maybe You can help me? Of course it this is correct way to handle this problem. I would love to read your comments and tips about what can I do better or how can i solve my problems.
      If i didnt mention something but You see something in my approach, write boldly, I will gladly read all Your tips :).
    • By Renmazuit
      I'm a composer looking for something to work on. If you're interested, feel free to PM me any questions.
      www.youtube.com/FFTLguy44
       
    • By Sergio Ronchetti
      I haven’t been classically trained when it comes to composing music, but thankfully you don’t have to be nowadays, if you want to throw in some violins or brass sections into your scores…

       
      This music was for the 2nd stage of a boss fight in the video game I’m currently working on (see here for a trailer) and I wanted some heavy music to pick up the pace and intensity of the battle sequence. The boss is a massive, ancient armoured knight in comparison to our much smaller warrior, so the mood of the track had to be intimidating and looming. Picking the right instruments and sound for a scene is half the battle in my opinion. Being a “souls-like” game, orchestral music is a go-to, but I’ve had no experience in doing so beforehand, so I started with something that’s familiar to me: a guitar. I slapped on some distortion and wrote a couple of ideas that I personally would want to hear when fighting this boss. I then layered it with some percussive mutes where I felt a beat, and a “lead” melody that could work over the top as a progression idea.
      I then opened my Native Instrument sample packs and started orchestrating (choosing the combination of instruments to play the notes of the riff) by writing my notes into Logic Pro X’s midi editor. A great place to start is with the low strings, ie the cellos and double basses, to build up from the lower frequency instruments. Then I added some trumpets and brass for accents and colour and finally shoved some nice heavy percussion loops to bring out the drive and power behind the musical idea.
      Some extra parts here and there, some reverb, compression and some mixing lead me to what you hear in the video above.
      Of course, i'm not trying to say that mixing experience isn't important in getting the overall sound right, as well as proficiency in your DAW (digital audio workstation) and knowing which instruments work best for certain passages. However this method (for me anyway) is a great way to build up confidence when utilising instruments and styles that are otherwise totally alien.
      Having a clear vision of what you want to create and a simple guitar riff can take you a long way.
      Thanks for reading.
      www.sergioronchetti.com
    • By Seer
      Currently if I was to program a game using C++ with SFML or Java with LibGDX I would render game objects by calling "object.render()" on the game object. Although this makes it easy to access the information necessary to render the game object, it also couples rendering to the game logic which is something I would like to move away from. How can rendering be implemented so that it is decoupled from the game objects?
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    • By Tristanb4
      I've been making music for about 7 years, I have hundreds of releases on soundcloud and bandcamp. Recently I have stepped up my post production game, pouring long hours into EQ and mixing. Most of my music is in a moody, "foggy" piano style with heavy experimentation through pitch shifting, overdubbing, and live recording. I use a spectrogram EQ to manually shape sounds and scoop out noise in Audacity. I am familiar with many general concepts, applying compression, reverb, high and low pass filters, and pretty much all of the effects in Audacity and many of the pitfalls and lessons of live recording for guitar and piano in my home studio. I am familiar with some other programs like ableton and fruity loops but live recording is my strong suit as opposed to composing music in a DAW. I rely heavily on improvisation, recording large amounts of audio and cutting it down and manipulating it in post as well as doing overdubs. I can put out a project of piano music in a month or so up to what I think is a high / acceptable standard that I personally am happy with.

      I am heavily inspired by Akira Yamaoka's work on the Silent Hill series as well as Angelo Badalamenti. I dream of composing music for games or short films, and feel like I'm ready to take on a project like that, as well as being willing to license my already existing music out which I think would be a perfect fit for the right type of horror game or anything with emotional elements.

      I am currently working on another project that will be released in December or on New Years. I will work for a reasonable amount and have done this out of passion for 5+ years because I love doing it. I feel that I have improved enough now to pursue doing something like this.

      Thank you so much to anyone who even bothers to click any of these links, and thank you for your time!

      Here are my links, and you can also email me directly at tristan.best@gmail.com

      www.soundcloud.com/domonemesis
      https://tristanb.bandcamp.com/
      https://www.facebook.com/TristanBMusic
      https://twitter.com/tbest253


      Other skills: I do all of my own cover art with digital photo editing and subsequently also have about 5 years of experience with that- photography and digital photo manipulation. I can work on marketing materials or art in this way. I play the Piano, Guitar, Synth / String piano etc, and I sing. I have close connections to some other musicians and visual artists. I will be honest if I don't think my music will work for your project or if I'm not sure if I can do something well enough, but I feel comfortable taking on some general audio design as well, including general sound / dialogue recording or noise reduction.
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