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A buildup to Midsummer Mayhem!

GrumpySam

965 views

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It has been a bit of a mixed week. Some of us are starting holidays and others have other obligations that has meant that last weeks progress was less eventful than previous weeks.

Renceed finished some heavy AA guns before hitting the beach:

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Here is the “making of” video: 

We’re gearing up our social media pages so that anybody interested in the project can stay up to date with what we’re doing:
A weekly blogpost to our Website (badbunch.net), Gamedev.net (https://bit.ly/2XlfZhU), and IndieDB (https://bit.ly/2ZAMCps).
Twitter (https://twitter.com/BunchBad) is being invigorated for additional posts during the week.
And of course our Discord (https://discord.gg/8KQuC9) is where people can get a lot of the info firsthand, usually in a post from the team member that created the content.

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Tallying up what we need have left before we open up the development build to the public the main two things we need are; 1) a larger map to host more players 2) testing multiplayer with as many people from a single region as we can get.
There are rumors of super secret groups of gamers that have signed up to playest the next build version and help show where the largest network synch sins are, as well as how easy/hard it is to figure out the controls and other gameplay details. But we'd of course have to deny that such an event is taking place.

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Very early concept of a map by the great Joel K. This stuff it too early in the design process to be balanced, so changes to the layout will happen:

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Air mines are awesome! And somethings odd with the water shader...

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End



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    • By Akupara Games
      Publishing 101 | Publishing 102 | Publishing 103
       
      Hi! David Logan here, CEO of Akupara Games! We get a lot of questions about the game publishing process and I decided I wanted to write a series of articles to help guide developers throughout decisions surrounding the release of their game. Before we get too nitty-gritty, let’s start with the biggest decision every developer has to make: should you partner with a game publisher?

       
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      Media Outreach
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      ---
      Akupara Games is an indie game studio based in Los Angeles, California. Composed of veterans of the game industry, Akupara Games focuses their energy and resources as an "indie for indies" studio by providing premier support to other indie studios through development, publishing, porting, and advising. Their mission statement ensures that each project receives a unique experience and personalized support.
      Website | Discord
       
      Note: This article was originally posted on the Akupara Games website, and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author.
       
       
    • By Akupara Games
      Publishing 101 | Publishing 102 | Publishing 103
       
      New year, new advice! My name is David Logan, CEO of Akupara Games, and I’d like to start the year with some more insider details on game publishing. Last year, I wrote the first entry for a series of articles to help guide developers throughout the decisions surrounding publishers and the release of their games. If you haven’t read that yet, I highly recommend you do so before continuing on.
      You’ve decided “Yeah, a publisher is a great fit for our project,” but now you’re interested in how exactly you decide which publisher is best for you. In this article, I will be detailing the tactics you should use while you are on the search for the best publisher. It’s time to roll up your sleeves, crack open a notebook, and throw down with some homework.
       
      Research
      First and foremost, you need to know your options and who you can consider as a publisher. Each publisher is a snowflake, most beautiful, and each different in their own ways. Let’s discuss how to go about finding the right one.
       
      Talk to Developers
      The most helpful tactic is to talk to other developers who have worked with publishers Ask about their experiences and try to get the most candid and honest feedback about working with the very publishers you may be considering Discuss the actual people involved in producing the games as mileage will vary with different producers from the same publisher Ask for recommendations It helps for other developers to understand where you are coming from and what you need/want for your project
       
      Read Online
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      Meeting Publishers
      Consider taking some time to go to conventions and networking events to meet publishers in person. It’s a great way to get face-to-face time with lots of publishers at once, and find those who are actively seeking new projects Great for not just meeting publishers, but other developers, investors, and press Going to live events can be expensive, but worthwhile if you maximize your time there. Book as many meetings as you can beforehand, so you have a full schedule. Don’t expect just to meet lots of connections on the spot This strategy allows you to talk about your game and showcase it to others to get some feedback for that extra polish you’ll want when you finally approach a publisher Resources to check out: Video Game Business and Marketing Microconference April 15, 2019 Online video call matchmaking services Without you needing to travel, they take the same idea of meeting lots of new connections at conferences and bring them to you digitally MeetToMatch – The San Francisco Edition 2019 March 20-22, 2019 Meet those in the industry located in San Francisco GDC March 18-22, 2019 Game Connection March 18-22, 2019 Can schedule meetings to sign deals  
      Game Performance
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      Post-launch of the popular title Stardew Valley, former publisher Chucklefish was responsible for implementing the multiplayer update to the game while the developer focused on creating for the game’s first major content update.
       
      Preparing Questions
      By now, you’ve talked to all your friends and connections. You’ve done hours of research on the Internet about your options. Maybe you’ve narrowed down a list of publishers you’d like to talk to and you have your spreadsheet of notes ready. You want to be prepared, so you brush up on what services you might want from a publisher. It’s time to reach out to these publishers and chat. However, before you do that, have some questions in your mind to ask during these conversations. Listed below are some questions you may want to ask:
       
      Communication
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      How long will you support our title post-launch? What are your relationships like with distributors such as Steam/Xbox/Switch/Apple? Who handles post launch merchandise DMCAs, trademarks, and copyright? Conventions
      Which conventions do you go to? Do you cover the cost of the travel, hotel, booth, and swag for conventions? Who will be showcasing at conventions – the publisher, developer, or both? Translation & Porting
      Do you support multi-platform releases? Who handles porting to other platforms? Which languages will you support for our title?  
      Specialties 
      While looking around for that publisher just-for-you, pay attention to the specialties of the publishers; not every publisher will be the right fit for you. It will be most conducive and helpful to your working relationship if the publisher is well-equipped to publish to your needs. Here are some things you’ll want to consider:
       
      Platforms
      Keep this question in mind as you search around – is your game designed for a desktop, console, or a mobile release? Maybe all three? I don’t recommend bringing your mobile-only game to a publisher who has no experience in helping to release a mobile game Vice versa, a publisher that has exclusively released mobile games may not be able to help you release your game on every current console
      Glu Mobile is a platform-focused publisher for mobile gaming. They have an extensive library of mobile-only games based on existing IPs and games partnered with celebrities/influencers.
       
      Monetization Models
      With big differences and theories behind the different monetization models, you need to pick a publisher that knows how to release a game based on the monetization model of your game Audiences won’t be happy if a title is released that deviates from the publisher’s typical model. Imagine trying to sell an up-front cost premium game with a publisher, when they’ve conditioned their audience with only free-to-play titles A publisher who has only released premium games may have minimal knowledge on  how to bring users to and market a title that has in-app purchases, or a subscription based model
      Though not an indie game, Nintendo’s Super Mario Run provides a wonderful example of how a monetization strategy can alienate or confuse your market that is accustomed to freemium models or premium games at a lower price point.
       
      Genres & Niches
      Similar to thinking about the platform needs of your game, consider the history and experience of publishers and if they align with your genre and niche needs Publishers will have developed an audience with their users, so it’s helpful if your game aligns with the rest of their catalogue Not all publishers will have the knowledge, resources, or tools to market all types of games E.g. A publisher with a large library of fighting games may not necessarily know how to bring out the best of your horror or first-person shooter game
      Nightdive Studios has built up a reputation for themselves for bringing back lost games that are no longer available by acquiring the rights to re-release, remaster, and update them for modern platforms. Their audiences can expect to see older games like those of the System Shock series of the 1990’s, which have greatly influenced the horror and first-person shooter genre.
       
      Other Games Released
      Being able to look at their catalog of other games, you will have a good sign of what their successes are like Their other games will individually have their own following of players, so this is something that can used to your advantage Similar to genre, publishers should have dedicated efforts to creating a community among their player base that will allow for a good starting point in releasing a new title
      A great contribution to Overcooked’s exposure was at E3 2016 when publisher Team17 placed the game’s booth next to their most anticipated title of the convention – Yooka-Laylee. Everyone came to see the game everyone knew about, but were easily pulled in to see the game no one knew about.
       
      Single vs. Multiplayer
      As with many of the previous points, does the publisher you’d like to work with have the experience to release your game if it’s multiplayer, especially online multiplayer? Multiplayer games require maintaining and engaging with a community of players more frequently and consistently Single player games may have bug fixes and occasional DLC added, but multiplayer games will require live-ops support, long after launch  
      Stream-ability
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      In the release of tinyBuild’s game, Punch Club, this publisher capitalized on Twitch and its chat function to give users a task: beat the game before it can be released. Coupled with a concurrent stream to race to the end, Punch Club secured featuring on Twitch.
       
      Development – Their Involvement
      You know best about your game and the team behind it; it’s vital for you to be aware and upfront about what you can and can’t successfully handle on your own in development. If you must outsource development needs to a publisher, you will definitely need to look into publishers who are able to offer you those skills whether through their own team or hiring the right people for you.
       
      Publisher is Hands-On with Development
      This is a great option if you are a small team full of talent, but you may be missing some key elements If this is your first foray into the industry, you may want to consider a publisher who can assist with advising and shaping your game A strong publisher will have a toolbox of knowledge, resources, and contacts to ensure the success of your product A hands-on publisher may work very closely with you along the way in how they see it necessary, offering suggestions or changes Perhaps you are set on the programming of the game, but only have placeholder art assets, and need a visual facelift From art, to programming, to sound, to almost anything in development, the right publisher will be able to fill in the gaps in your team
      In our own case, Akupara Games was responsible for the programming overhaul, addressing existing bugs, porting to mobile devices, and recomposing and recording all of the audio for Keep in Mind: Remastered.
       
      Publisher is Hands-Off with Development
      For a developer that feels comfortable with where their game is at, but just needs the support of a publisher to take the game to market, this is just as practical The publisher will still provide standard support and marketing efforts to get your game’s name out there This allows for the developer to maintain the most creative integrity This is great for those who are very sure of their creation and would not want external influence  
      Approach
      Not every publisher works the same way. Just like how not every developer needs the same things from a publisher. Consider what methods a publisher may use in your campaign to help inform your decision.
      Custom Campaigns
      One-of-a-kind campaign that is unique and tailored to what makes your game stand out You can expect efforts to pay back in dividends as publishers may offer up some out-of-the-box ideas that will have people talking about your game The downside is these often take chances, which may not always pan out Standard Campaigns
      Looking through a publisher’s portfolio of titles and their associated campaigns, you may feel that nothing seems like it deviated from one another However, this may be a useful indication of what you can exactly expect with your campaign You’ll be hard-pressed to find a developer who goes out of their way to seek out a publisher who will only do a standard campaign. However, as the developer, this is something you will need to weigh the importance of.
       
      Long-Term Relationship
      This section is really case-by-case for you developers out there. You will need to ask yourself if you’re looking for a publisher that is strictly business, or one which you can see developing a good long-term relationship in the future that may extend outside of just business and work. Do you want your publisher to see you as just a client, or do you want something that goes the extra mile? Perhaps if you’re lucky, you will find that special publisher that you will keep coming back to, project after project. Let’s talk about how to build a strong relationship.

      Publisher Raw Fury has built up a working partnership and relationship with the developer Noio since 2015 to release three games in the Kingdom series together.
       
      People
      Start off by finding a publisher who has a team of people that you get along with During initial conversations, examine what it feels like when you talk with each other Consider if you would feel comfortable candidly bringing up any concerns you may have Personality Traits
      Do your personality traits complement one another? Think about your communication styles Finding a publisher is like dating. Both parties must be willing to communicate and work together to raise the baby that is the game Offer a problem you may have and see if you agree with their response  
      Financing
      At last, we’ve arrived at one of the final things you’ll need to consider while you’re talking to your potential publishers. Money. This can be the game changer or even deal breaker. What is the role that money will be playing in the production of your game? Do you need it? If so, where is it coming from? Here are some things to think about in terms of financing in talks with a publisher.

       
      Provision
      Will the publisher offer financing? Financing can alleviate a lot of developer concerns, and help developers devote more full-time work to the game If you feel a publisher is a good fit and they don’t provide financing, but you still require it, consider other routes outside of a publisher for financing If they won’t be providing any financing, it is a fair question to ask them for any advice on how to acquire what you need In fact, while a publisher may not provide financing, they may be able to provide the resources and services you need to acquire them Should You Accept?
      Consider the downside of accepting financing A publisher requires a larger revenue, often with a recoup up front If you need a little more information on this topic, definitely take the time to check out my first article in the series, where it outlines and expands on financing.
       
      Conclusion
      We’ve covered the jumping off points for thinking about your game from a business standpoint, so now it’s time for you to start working towards finding the best publisher for you.
      Hopefully after this you’ll be able to identify a list of publishers who could fit your needs!
      In our final article in our game publishing series, we’ll talk about actually pitching your game to publishers in – “What Publishers Look for in Games”.
      If you have any questions after reading this, or feel something is missing, let us know on social media @AkuparaGames on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Discord.
       
      ---
      Akupara Games is an indie game studio based in Los Angeles, California. Composed of veterans of the game industry, Akupara Games focuses their energy and resources as an "indie for indies" studio by providing premier support to other indie studios through development, publishing, porting, and advising. Their mission statement ensures that each project receives a unique experience and personalized support.
      Website | Discord
       
      Note: This article was originally posted on the Akupara Games website, and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author.
    • By Harry Loretz
      Hey there everyone, I am quite new to C++ and have implemented some code for an invisibility spell/command. What currently happens is I press "1" then the character goes invisible, it activates a timer (InvisibilityStop) timer plays out, then the character reappears on it's own as intended, while another timer(InvisibilityCooldown) is playing so i can't immediately go invisible again. I just want to be able to go Visible whenever i am Invisible but i want there to be a corresponding timer so i can't go invisible right away, i also would like this timer to be the remaining time of the "InvisibilityCooldown". Here is the code. 
      void AOmniCharacter::GoInvisible()
      {
          if (VisibilityNegate)
          {
              GetInvisibleMesh()->ToggleVisibility();
              ACharacter::GetMesh()->ToggleVisibility();
              VisibilityNegate = false;
              GetWorldTimerManager().SetTimer(InvisibilityHandle, this, &AOmniCharacter::StopInvisibilty, InvisibilityStop, true);
          }
      }
      void AOmniCharacter::StopInvisibilty()
      {
          GetInvisibleMesh()->ToggleVisibility();
          ACharacter::GetMesh()->ToggleVisibility();
          GetWorldTimerManager().SetTimer(InvisibilityHandle, this, &AOmniCharacter::ResetInvisibilitySpell, InvisibilityCooldown, false);
      }
      void AOmniCharacter::ResetInvisibilitySpell()
      {
          VisibilityNegate = true;
       
       
      Please help, i can't figure this out, I also do not wish to tie this spell into a mana system.
      Thankyou.
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