Jump to content
  • Advertisement
  • entries
    3
  • comments
    4
  • views
    352

Project: Wild Origin

An Artist Trying to Program

Cody.Rauh

875 views

Initially, it wasn't pretty, and I have been told about 300 times to go watch tutorials when asking for help in discord... while trying to do something I was following in a tutorial.

Trying to program starting out is like trying to walk down a hallway where you can't see the doors or windows on either side of you. Everyone else around you is screaming dude just turn the knob, you sit all puzzled, "What knob?" All that aside I feel things are going much smoother now about three months into this. I still struggle from time to time with super simple stuff like GetComponent while on the other hand being able to write a functioning weather system based on coroutines (timers).

Actually being from an art background is one of the reasons I wanted to start this blog. I don't feel like an artist going into programming is a story I hear as much as maybe a programmer spiffing up his art skill or just plain out hiring a starving desperate artist to do the work for him. 

I wanted to share with you a few of my achievements in the past week.

Progress often feels like you are surrounded by obstacles eager to kill you while you struggle to get moving.

FacilityWalk.gif

And just when you feel like you are finally moving you seem to hit a red light every 3 seconds.

Light.gif

At the end of the day though you know you have to just get back up tomorrow and keep on swimming.

SwimmingCorey.gif

Obviously, that is the only way you will ever open doors to opportunity!

DoorOpen.gif
 



4 Comments


Recommended Comments

Magogan

Posted (edited)

There is so much more to programming than just writing code. You should know complexity theory, algorithms, data structures, databases, ...

It obviously depends on the project but the first 3 are helpful in general - unless you only write code that sets flags based on conditions like your weather system for example.

Math is also pretty important for game programming.

Edited by Magogan

Share this comment


Link to comment

Yeah, about all these convinience of predefined Assets and Visual Scripting you have and people are frequently crying for nowdays, many people forget that someone in the background has to make all these stuff to work properly. I takes a lot of time to design a system that is easy to be used from people with a different background, like you when doing art it is the same for us doing code. "Why the heck do you try to use <tool> instead of <another tool>" is very simple if you know what youa re doing, regardless of which profession (except Game Design 😋) you have mastered.

Making games sounds to many people like it is just a week of work and you have the next AAA shit, thanks to Unity and Unreal that create the illusion that it wasn't easier to get your mind blown idea to life. I frequently hear Game Designers to talk about how they would "program" the game using Blue Prints and become rude when telling them that it takes a lot more skill to really program a game.

Quote

I have been told about 300 times to go watch tutorials when asking for help

However, this isn't fair at all! If you are really trying to get into it, you have the right for a correct-or-no-answer. It might be difficult for people to share their knowledge but they got help too at one or the other step in learning their profession so why shouldn't you!

You should always keep in mind that coding Unity is not like programming software from scratch and however learn the basics. There are good apps out there that give insight into the basic principles of programming, data types, memory, loops, control structures, anything you need regardless if you code Unity or any other language.

It is like learning your tools then doing Art and then comes the creativity but instead of getting something out of your head to paper, you will learn to solve problems because programming isn't anything else like solving problems and/with math.

Good luck and keep moving!

Share this comment


Link to comment
 
 
5
 Advanced issues found
 
 
 
5 hours ago, Magogan said:

There is so much more to programming than just writing code. You should know complexity theory, algorithms, data structures, databases, ...

It obviously depends on the project but the first 3 are helpful in general - unless you only write code that sets flags based on conditions like your weather system for example.

Math is also pretty important for game programming.

Honestly, I couldn't even give you the definition of the first three things you listed without having to go google it, and I was always terrible at math. That said, I am a big believer in doing what you can with what you have at the moment, and building your capability each day by learning all the above you mentioned, and more importantly learning to love the process by seeing the value in each component required to do the activity as a whole.

Its a process, or is it a method, maybe a function? ( joking ) xD
 

5 hours ago, Shaarigan said:

Yeah, about all these convinience of predefined Assets and Visual Scripting you have and people are frequently crying for nowdays, many people forget that someone in the background has to make all these stuff to work properly. I takes a lot of time to design a system that is easy to be used from people with a different background, like you when doing art it is the same for us doing code. "Why the heck do you try to use <tool> instead of <another tool>" is very simple if you know what youa re doing, regardless of which profession (except Game Design 😋) you have mastered.

Making games sounds to many people like it is just a week of work and you have the next AAA shit, thanks to Unity and Unreal that create the illusion that it wasn't easier to get your mind blown idea to life. I frequently hear Game Designers to talk about how they would "program" the game using Blue Prints and become rude when telling them that it takes a lot more skill to really program a game.

However, this isn't fair at all! If you are really trying to get into it, you have the right for a correct-or-no-answer. It might be difficult for people to share their knowledge but they got help too at one or the other step in learning their profession so why shouldn't you!

You should always keep in mind that coding Unity is not like programming software from scratch and however learn the basics. There are good apps out there that give insight into the basic principles of programming, data types, memory, loops, control structures, anything you need regardless if you code Unity or any other language.

It is like learning your tools then doing Art and then comes the creativity but instead of getting something out of your head to paper, you will learn to solve problems because programming isn't anything else like solving problems and/with math.

Good luck and keep moving!


I agree with you on so many points! I spent the last 13+ years getting better at art, and depending on who you ask on what day someone would say 13 years? This guy sucks.  Which while not the most actionable feedback has a truth to it that we all have room to improve every day. I imagine even programming every day as I have been if done for 13 years would likely yield a similar result.

Art like coding has its own snobbery, I think this is true of anything, and it is made worse by 95% of people in the world looking at someone and saying I can do that! While they have the potential they often don't realize all the work that goes into it. The only problem I ever have is being grouped in that category, something honestly I have had to get over, cause 99.99% of people don't know you, and it isn't personal it is just what people are used to dealing with.

I do wish people would ask vs. assume, but you can want in one hand and ______ in the other and see which fills up faster. ;)

Another thing is most are in it to get rich, and many of us with experience know it would be easier to buy a lottery ticket and win than make a "successful game", plus you wouldn't have to invest 5, 10, or even 20 years of your life. I myself am aiming for social impact and culture change instead of money, and that may be an even harder fought goal. Never claimed to be sane, lol.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I'm a little bit more selfish and do what I do because I like it to do and I always can't wait to see/play the result as my best customer and strictest reviewer

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • Blog Entries

  • Similar Content

    • By ChocolatePancakes
      I just recently watched a 4-hour longplay of ATV Quad Power Racing 2 on the Xbox. I wondered, how did they achieve the physics on the quad bikes? Because after analyzing moments in the video where the quad bike landed after a long jump, bicycled, or crashed It seems to me that the wheels are "physical" rather than simply raycasted/shapecasted. I have two hypothesis:
      1. The quad is entirely kinematic. The physics acted upon it are simulated through the animation.
      2. The quad has a different physics body for collisions and a different one for driving.
       
      So, how could have they achieved such physics in the game?
    • By sandramaj
      Heyo! Can you recommend some online resources for learning Game Programming?
    • By RoKabium Games
      The blocks you mine has different hardness and characteristics. The most common type is of a medium strength, and then you can find softer and harder ones while digging. Blocks that cannot be mined at all are distinctively different and also has a red marker around them if you aim at them.
    • By JoAndRoPo
      Hi Everyone!
      I'm in a bit of a pickle right now ☹️! I'm creating a 5x3 Slot game for android and I'm kind of stuck when it comes to the number of symbols placed in each reel😤.
      I tried to understand how the symbols are placed in other android slot games but it's a bit tough😫. Is there a logic behind the placement of symbols🤔? 
      By any chance can anyone out there help me out with the logic/doc./tutorials, etc.,😬? That would be highly appreciated 🙏! 
      Thanks in advance! 
    • By CelticSir
      I asked else where on other websites for this and never got answers, I am struggling to know how to do a design pattern for abilities that you can swap in and out that affect the given object's stats.
       
      Lets take a weapon like a gun as an example. Of which can have a number of attachments that affect its aim, fire rate, magazine count etc. You can add/remove the attachments. 

      I can setup something like that pretty easily (although its very tedious) by creating each attachment and setting its data to what it affects. But then i ran into problems for putting restrictions in place, because then i need a unique one for each weapon they are restricted to. For example:

      Scope A only attaches to gun A , C, D
      Magazine A attaches only to gun B , C

      When i have these specific restrictions - my tedious approach of hard writing it kinda falls apart. So i need a design pattern where this will work easily.

      What is the correct way to design this in C# ? I can't figure out a clean system for this at all. 
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!