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New Integration: Microsoft’s Mixed Reality Capture Studios Brings Lifelike Holograms to the Web

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8thWallDev

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1*nWgFEKLuxf2uaV3qpLSuPA.pngImage provided by Microsoft

Our latest integration will allow you to bring realistic holograms to life in WebAR. Microsoft’s Mixed Reality Capture Studios generates high res, low latency volumetric videos which can now be imported into your 8th Wall Web project. Check it out:

Now your favorite celebs, athletes (and even you!) can teleport anywhere at anytime, using Microsoft’s MRCS and 8th Wall WebAR.

Try the demo out for yourself here!

We love the quality of the volumetric videos produced by MRCS and the speed at which they load in a web browser is unmatched. It isn’t too far-fetched to assume that we may see sporting events, concerts and even films being reenacted by human holograms on kitchen tables around the world very soon.

“We’re thrilled to partner with 8th Wall, and have been impressed how great our holograms look and play in their WebAR solution. Such easy and instant access really delivers on the promise of volumetric video for mixed reality anytime, anywhere,” said Steve Sullivan, General Manager of MRCS.

View all of 8th Wall’s supported integrations in our docs.

Is there an integration that you’d like to see 8th Wall support? Drop us a note in the comments below, message us on Slack or tweet us @the8thwall 📢

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New Integration: Microsoft’s Mixed Reality Capture Studios Brings Lifelike Holograms to the Web was originally published in 8th Wall on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


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    • By Ruben Torres
      [The original post with its original format can be found here]
      Players want to play, they don't want to wait. Help them buying your game: reduce your game's download size with Unity Addressables Hosting. And a year later? Offer them a DLC based on, guess what? Addressables.

      Picture your potential player on a Friday afternoon.
      Your player has just left behind a hard week with long working hours. Their wife or husband is gone to their family's country house for the weekend along with the kids. The perfect time to go home, order pizza and browse through Steam with the wallet at hand.
      With or without kids, with or without partner, we all had these awesome weekends.
      Just videogames, please.

      So your player comes across your newly released game in the Steam shop. They see all the effort you put into creating polished content.
      No need for convincing, they hand in their credit card details and buy two copies of your game. One for theirself, another for their friend / brother / sister.
      You get your 19.95 bucks, twice. Both users happily start installing the game.
      But wait...
      A wild Steam installation pop-up appears.

      The remaining installation time suddenly exploded to 12 hours
      What, 12 hours for over 30GB? What the #*@! is in this game?
      I'm not wasting my weekend on this shit, I'm out!
      What happens afterward is not uncommon.
      Your ex-player requests a full refund and purchase instead the next game in their wish-list.
      One of the pain points for players is the waiting time wasted on downloading all the bytes of the whole game and start playing. People do not have that much time. Nothing will burn a hole in your wallet faster than an angry player.
      Do you need to include in your installation package all these assets that are spawned in the level 5 of your game? Chances are, you don't.
      Players will need a couple of hours to play through the initial content of your game. Use that to your advantage
      The idea is simple.
      Provide the minimum content possible in your game installation package and download the rest while playing the initial levels of your game.
      Can you picture your player ready to play in a mere minute after purchasing your game? How different would the reviews be compared to the ones commonly found with huge games?




      Ideally, your game's download size should be below 100MB.
      But how?
      This is what you will get by the time you're done implementing the information of this article:
      Ridiculously tiny installation sizes A new Amazon S3 bucket to host your content online Upload Unity Addressable Assets to S3 through the Unity Editor Download the Unity Addressable Assets from the S3 bucket in your player builds A high-five from your happy players
      Fox / Via mashable.com
      Level 1 Developer: "Storage is cheap, anyway"
      We started developing our game a few months ago and we have big plans for it.
      You and I worked endless hours into creating highly polished content.
      Not only that, we saw some great offers in the Unity Asset Store, so we bought several asset packs at heavily discounted prices.
      Now our game is full of content our players will love to play through. Those Sci-Fi modular parts, the exploding particle systems, the punchy soundtrack.
      It's all gorgeous. 
      And heavy.
      And slow to download.
      Now your Android APK is well over 2GB, so you need to start messing with expansion files, which adds another good week to your efforts. But it's fine, we all have time here.
      Or maybe you're publishing on Steam, so you can be at 30 GB, no problem. You just need a few hours for uploading it. And players? It's ok, people have a fast connection nowadays.
      So we released our game. Some players reported some bugs, so we make a 5-minute fix and we go through all the long process again. Build, wait for hours, upload to stores, wait for hours.
      And our players? They just re-download the whole thing again. Wait for hours, then start playing.
      It's not a big deal.
      Only that you are not recovering all the time you wasted on this previously. And a great deal of your players will stop downloading your game once they see how many hours they have to wait. That only gets worse with each update. Did I mention refunds?
      We can do better than this, now that we have the tools.
      Let's upgrade our skills to Level-2.

      Level 2 Developer: Unity Addressables Hosting
      Welcome to Unity Addressables.
      This package will allow you to efficiently manage your game assets. That, my friend, includes online distribution. For an introduction on this topic, visit my previous article on Unity Addressables Benefits for your game.
      These are the steps you and I will be following in the article:
      Set up an Amazon S3 Bucket for online distribution Mark our content as Unity Addressable Assets for online distribution Upload our content to the cloud Profit from tiny installation sizes (and others) Like granny said, a 2D sprite is worth a thousand times:

      Unity Addressables Hosting with Amazon S3 - Steps
      Let's start with...
      1. Setting Up a Free Amazon S3 Bucket
      It's our lucky day. Amazon offers a free tier for their S3 service.
      That means, we're going to host our content for free. The limitations for their free tier is mostly storage space and the number data transfers. At the moment of writing this, you can store for free up 5GB and perform 20,000 GET and 2,000 PUT requests, but do double check it in the official site of AWS Free Tiers.
      What we are going to do here is to create an account for AWS so we are ready to upload our game content for further distribution.
      You and I will do this as fast as possible. No need to waste time in detail. No BS.
      Setting up Amazon S3 Hosting for Unity Addressables
      1.1. Create AWS account
      Navigate to the AWS Management Console and click on Create a Free Account.

      Enter your e-mail and bla bla bla. That will take you roughly a minute.
      Be aware that you'll need to give them your credit card info to verify your identity.
      1.2. Choose AWS Plan
      Unless you're going pro right from the start, we want to evaluate this in our game first.
      So, after confirming your account, choose the basic plan.

      1.3. Create your first S3 bucket
      After a few minutes, your account will be activated (you'll get an e-mail). Then, sign in to your new console and open the S3 service panel:

      You are now located at the S3 control panel.
       
      Now we are ready to create the bucket like shown below (change your bucket name and region!):



      Leave the permissions set to public for now, you'll have the chance to tweak them in the future.
      Your S3 bucket for Unity Addressables is now ready, congratulations!
      That was the most tedious step.
      The next step is a piece of cake: time to get your Unity Project to produce downloadable assets.
      Summary:
      Use the AWS Management Console to create a Free Tier S3 Bucket For starting, assign public permissions to your S3 Bucket Alternatively, use another storage service based on the spreadsheet in the Resources Pack
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      Finally, we made it to Unity. That whole S3 process was getting old.
      I will assume you have some content marked as Addressable in your game. If that's not the case because you are new to this, don't worry, I have you covered with the previous Unity Addressables Tutorial I wrote.
      I'll show you the steps to get content uploaded in your newly created AWS S3 Bucket. We will do so based on a project I created for this purpose.
      Instead of following the whole story, you can also skip the line, get access to the code now and read later.

      Unity Addressables - Profile Settings
      A. Addressables Profile Configuration
      The way to start is to tell Unity where to load remote assets from.
      That we achieve by tweaking our Addressables Profile Configuration. In the Addressables main window, click on:
       Profile: Default → Inspect Profile Settings.
      This will redirect you to the settings we need to tweak.
      Here is a collection of funny toys you can play with, but for our purposes we just need to focus on the Profiles section.
      We want to make sure we set the Addressables RemoteLoadPath field to the correct URL.
      We form the RemoteLoadPath URL by concatenating our S3 Bucket URL with the Unity variable [BuildTarget], like below:
      https://YOUR-BUCKET-NAME.s3.YOUR-REGION-NAME.amazonaws.com/[BuildTarget] E.g. https://thegamedevguru.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/[BuildTarget] The [BuildTarget] variable is left on purpose so Unity fetches in run-time the right assets for each of the platforms we build for. Android assets will be packed differently from Standalone, so each of these platforms will require a different directory.
      The way I found my S3 Bucket URL is by uploading a random file; if you then navigate to its details, you'll see the base URL of your file and hence your bucket.
      B. Addressable Asset Groups Configuration
      So, we just told Unity where to load the remote assets from through the RemoteLoadPath variable.
      Great. What is left is to tell which assets should be loaded remotely. Easy.
      Go over the heavy assets you want to be downloaded remotely and mark these Assets as Addressable. In our case, it's the skybox materials. Open the Unity Addressables Window and assign these assets to Addressable Asset Groups. If you are just starting with Addressables, assign them to a single group for now; e.g. Skyboxes. Eventually, you'll want them to be grouped in a way that makes sense (check my Level-3 guide on Unity Addressables Tutorial for more info). Navigate to the Addressables Group inspector settings by clicking on the group and make the following adjustments: BuildPath is set to RemoteBuildPath LoadPath is set to RemoteLoadPath You can see a graphical breakdown of this entire process below.

      Asset Groups for Unity Addressables Hosting

      Unity Addressable Asset Group Settings for Network Delivery
      We now have our skybox content assigned to a group that will be downloaded by your players in run-time.
       Summary 
      Set RemoteLoadPath to the base URL of your web hosting provider Append the [BuildTarget] variable into RemoteLoadPath  to differentiate multiple platforms Assign your Unity Addressable Assets to a group and tweak its settings to use the remote paths so it'll be downloaded from your web hosting provider  

      3. Uploading Content to Amazon S3
      All our settings are now in place. What about uploading our content to S3?
      This is a simple two-step process:
      Build player content. Upload it to S3. Building Addressables Player Content is straightforward. Open the Addressables main window and press the button that does just that. This will cook the assets for the current platform your editor is in. 

      Unity Addressables: Build Player Content
      The output content will be stored in the path dictated by the RemoteBuildPath variable you happened to see early in the Unity Addressables Profile Settings. If you didn't modify it, it's likely to be in a subfolder of your project called ServerData.
      The second step involves navigating to that directory and dropping its contents into the website of your S3 bucket, as you can see just below:

      Unity-Addressable Assets - Upload to S3
      There you have it, it's that simple.
      However, this can quickly become tedious. It's a very manual task that could easily be automated. I did just that so now uploading all my assets takes the press of a button inside Unity Editor.
      To upload your Unity Addressable Assets directly from the Unity Editor, check my Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack at the end of the article.

      4. Downloading Assets from Amazon S3
      This is the part we all were waiting for. You now have a game you can distribute that is significantly smaller. The remaining part is launching it and watching it download the assets on demand!
      If you want to make sure these assets are being effectively downloaded, delete the data from your S3 Bucket, disable the caching option in your Addressable Asset Group Settings, rebuild the content and your player. If you launch it, you should see a few error messages pop up, as you can see below.

      Unity Addressable Assets Download Error
      If you followed this tutorial on Unity Addressables Hosting, chances are, you will be totally alright
      By now, the asset groups you marked to be remotely downloaded are hosted in S3 and Unity knows how to fetch them.
       

      The Gamedev Guru's S3 Upload Tool
      Level 3 Developer: Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack
      By now you should have your first Unity Addressables Hosting experiment up and running.
      You learned how to build player content specifically to target downloadable content.
      That's great, but there's more than just the basics. To help you further, I prepared a Free Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack just for you.  This bundle contains:
      A spreadsheet comparing different hosting alternatives to the pricey S3 An extension to upload your Unity Addressable Asset to Amazon S3 directly from the Editor The source code of this project; see it for yourself Newsletter access with exclusive free content Level up your skills. Download your free Resource Pack now.

       
    • By rgaule
      Hello,
      As the title says, looking for a SMM / Promoter for my hobby project.
      Project is nearing completion, your job would be to start generating buzz & bringing in views via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Forums, etc. Lots of material for screenshots and screen-recordings.
      Twitter account currently has > 50 < 100 followers
      IG sitting over 1,500
      If interested, please DM and I will share project website more details.
      Looking for someone who can post minimum 4-7x week across main social platforms.
    • By Ruben Torres
      [This article was originally posted at The Gamedev Guru's Blog]
      I normally do not share my past struggles, but this topic deserves it. What to do when you lose hope with Unity UI?
      I still remember that weekend, about five years ago...
      I spent the entire weekend worried about all the technical debt I was accumulating over the months in one of my projects. I had done things too quickly, without really understanding them. Clearly enough, that had to stop working at some point.
      The thing is, I owed my clients results but I had no idea how to bring them. That morning though, I said to myself: Rubén, this is enough. Stop the excuses. You are becoming a professional today.
      So, I decided to gather every single resource I could find about user interfaces in Unity, because that was the biggest hurdle I was dealing with for several weeks. I read forums, best practices, Unite videos, read all blogs I could find on that topic and did my own research.

      Did you ever experience this feeling of slowly getting overwhelmed by technical debt? It accumulates over time and someday you either give up or decide to crush it. In my case, it was the later.
      You probably heard that optimizing UI in Unity is challenging. Or, if lucky, you know it from first-hand experience. Yes, Unity UI is a powerful tool and I love it. However, its mightiness can quickly transform into a deadly weapon if it falls into inexperienced hands. And so were my hands back then.
      If I had to confess anything to you today, it would be this: I wished I had had a solid foundation on Unity UI before I designed the UI of several games.
      It is SO easy to do it wrong, SO easy to get frustrated. In my opinion, there's something even easier than that. That is, for your client to ask you to do over-hours to get your shit together.
      In my experience in the professional sector, companies do not want developers who design poorly optimizable interfaces and leave the tuning task to experienced programmers. They rather want developers who create visually stunning interfaces, but also performant.
      And even in the indie development scene, where would you choose to spend your time on? Bringing fun to your players, or spending hours clicking through the profiler to find bottlenecks?
      In my opinion: no matter your role, you should understand basic Unity UI design principles. But this takes time and project experience. You might not have any of these.
      Hopefully, I can help you there.
      Today, I will give you one of my most powerful tools:
      The Guru's UI Development Diagram
      As usual, I'd like to start with the Level 1 Developer construct
       
      Level 1 Unity UI Developer: UpdateBatches & Layout Spikes in Unity UI
      Level 1 Unity UI Developer: free-style UI
      This is where we all start: free-style design, free-style results.
      I used to import sprites with whatever settings. Then, I would add them as images everywhere with no predefined criteria. And so I ended up with an unstructured hierarchy full of components that I didn't need. I used the wrong systems for the wrong reasons.
      Overlapping UI elements, a motherload of batches, profiler spikes. Those are all common.
      Do I have anything against this?
      Partially. I think it is great to play around and to make mistakes. Breaking and repairing help learning.
      But if you want to do this for a living, at some point you might want to level up your skills and embrace professionalism.
      This becomes unacceptable in the games industry, especially in Virtual Reality. If you do this in VR you will turn players into patients.
      Such a chaotic Canvas hierarchy structure could look like this:

      Level 1 Unity UI Developer: Unstructured Unity UI Hierarchy
      You do a lot of nesting, you use auto-layout components everywhere and there is a lack of rules.
      At some point, someone will ask you to optimize your UI. That could be your players, your boss or even your own pride.
      But you might not be ready for this. You might be caught off-guard having other tasks on your plate. And UI development is daunting at the beginning.
      The reason for its complexity lies in the amount of factors it involves. Leaving the visual appeal aside, you can say that the way you work with Unity UI will have a big impact in three critical hardware pieces: the CPU, the GPU and the developer theirself.
      If you are lost, it's good, because...
      I am about to show you something cool
      Let's level up as a developer!
       
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The Guru's UI Development Diagram
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The Guru's UI Development Diagram
      Here we are with a Venn Diagram. I decided to call it The Guru's UI Development Diagram.
      There we see three big chunks related to Unity UI Optimization: CPU, GPU, and Developer. Those are the main resources you will have to spare when developing UI.
      I want to give you a short overview before we start digging into the topics.
      You pay the CPU toll mainly when generating and submitting batches of UI. You can think of them as UI components, such as images. The more of those you have, the more strain you will put in your processor.
      The turn for the GPU. You pay the GPU resources mostly in concept of overdraw. This means, stacking layers of graphics on top of each other.
      Lastly, the developer's pain is paid in time. You spend time every time you design or maintain your UI. Unity offers you some tools to make it easier for you, e.g. auto-layout helpers.
      The cost of the three components rely mostly on you, but they sometimes counteract each other. It's very challenging to perform in every aspect, unless you are very experienced and you have the right tools.
      Eventually, you will get there.
      I would like you to have a closer look at the attached Guru's UI Development Diagram.
      You might be confused. That's alright because we are going to cover each section separately. You will get to understand all of it.
      For now, you only have to understand one thing: in the end, it will be up to you to find the balance between the three variables in your game.
      Before we start with each component, have a look at these general rules:
      The easier you want the UI design workflow to be, the less performant your UI will be. If you want more GPU performance, you will have to focus on finely tweaking graphical elements and avoid element stacking. For more CPU performance, you will need to reduce the amount of graphical elements present in the hierarchy. Let's move on, I can't wait to show you the CPU side of Unity UI Optimization!
       
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The CPU
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The CPU
      In my opinion, this is very simple.
      The golden rule is:
      Every time you add a UI component in your scene, you are adding CPU overhead
      Each component increases the CPU cost for the following reasons:
      RectTransform calculation: this is pretty much free in simple canvas hierarchies. However, your CPU will have a harder time if you are using auto-layout components to ease your UI design workflow, such as vertical layout groups and such. The issue with those is that most RectTransforms present in the hierarchy will now depend on each other, so the calculation becomes more complex. Vertex generation: the GPU understands vertices, thus those must be provided by the CPU. Vertices must be generated based on the entire canvas hierarchy of the involved RectTransform elements. The vertices depend as well on the specific type of UI element you added (images, texts). Under this category, we also include the cost for the CPU to add other per-vertex attributes such as colors and UVs. Dynamic batching: because draw calls are expensive, Unity does its best to dynamically batch as many of them as possible.
      Think of this as combining a large number of small groups of vertices into a single, huge group of vertices. Because... would you rather go to the supermarket ten times to bring an apple each, or go just once and grab them all together?
      Batching is, however, an expensive operation for the CPU which increases with the amount of UI elements you have. Draw call emission: finally, the generated batches must be sent to the GPU. These graphical processing units are very picky with the data formats they accept, so the CPU has to make extra work to pack them in a way that they like. This is expensive, yes. But luckily for us, Unity is kind of smart and caches the canvas so these expensive processes do not happen in every frame.
      Just as I brought you good news, I will give you the bad ones: this cache is super easy to break.
      Changing almost any attribute of any UI element will break the cache of your canvas. If that happens, we go through most of the process again. These changes, by the way, trigger what is called a canvas rebuild.
      I'll give you some examples of the breaking changes: scaling, positioning, rotation, color, image swapping, animations and more.
      After exposing the basics, I want to conclude with three practical observations:
      The more elements you have in your Unity Canvas, the more CPU overhead you will have on each canvas rebuild. Avoid any kind of changes in UI to avoid canvas rebuilds. If needed, then put dynamic elements in different canvases. Canvases are either static or dynamic. Design accordingly.  
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The GPU
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The GPU
      Now is the turn for the friendly Graphical Processing Unit, don't you think?
      The GPU is the piece of hardware that makes us fall in love with games. We owe them so much. What about showing it some affection? Well, we can...
      By treating it well.
      But guess what? UI can make the GPU pretty upset. Especially mobile GPUs, where it is relatively easy to be memory-bound. To put it simply:
      In mobile, there is a massive reason UI is expensive: overdraw!
      Overdraw happens when we render the same pixel multiple times per frame. And this is soooo easy to achieve with Unity.
      Every time to add a Unity UI Image, you are commanding your GPU to draw a full rectangle, rendering every single pixel inside that rectangle. And it does not matter if the pixel you are drawing is transparent, it will cost you still.
      That means, I advise you to be careful with the transparent regions of your sprites!
      This has some implications for you. If you add 10 full-screen images, then you get 10x overdraw. As my grandmother used to say, WTAIWYG! (What You Add Is What You Get).
      Stacking of layers on top of each other will slowly enrage your GPU. It will add milliseconds to it, which is a crime in VR games where your budget could very well be under 13ms.
      I do not want to get too technical in this post... but I can't just help it! Some day you will be having a delicious coffee break conversation with your colleagues and you might feel tempted to drop a few intellectual lines. If that's the case, say this one aloud:
      UI Overdraw is expensive in mobile because you devour the precious memory bandwidth of the device and this is further worsened by the alpha blending happening internally
      You'll make some jaws drop.
      The key lesson is easy: avoid stacking UI elements on top of each other and you will be fine 
      GPU cost mainly comes from stacking graphical layers on top of each other. Avoid these. Reduce the space UI takes in screen to reduce GPU cost. Implement sprite atlasing to improve CPU and GPU performance.  
      PRO TIP #1: Sprite Atlasing (opens in a new tab)
      PRO TIP #2: Opaque UI Shading (opens in a new tab; Advanced)
       
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The Developer
      Level 2 Unity UI Developer: The Developer!
      I am afraid we often under-estimate the effort required to design, implement and especially maintain optimized user interfaces in Unity.
      Surely, Unity improved in this area during the last few years and now it is easier and faster than ever to create those. But this comes at a cost.
      In general, the more Unity UI extras you use, the worse your game will perform.
      The auto-layout helpers are especially expensive. Unfortunately, they are the most helpful. For instance, I find Vertical Layout Groups especially handy when designing responsive UI. These neat scripts help you organize your elements in a manner that is structured and therefore visually appealing.
      The problem I see with those is that they incur on a big CPU cost whenever there are canvas rebuilds!
      You might be able to get away with UI helpers if your UI is static 99% of the time, but the frame it isn't, you will notice it.
      We love working with helpers, but we don't want to ruin our performance. Here's one trick you can try: keep the auto-layout helpers around while designing but disable them all just before saving your scene. By doing this, they will be deactivated for run-time players, but they already did their work for you!
      I don't want to disappoint you, so just remember that this auto-layout disabling secret will not work if your UI content is dynamic.
      At the end of the day, the more tasks you delegate to Unity, the more work your hardware will have to do.  Find your own balance here! You can start using those helpers but be ready to remove them if you have to.
      While optimizing, do the biggest gains for the buck first. Only advance in the ladder of diminishing returns if the profiler tells you that you have to.
      For instance, creating sprite atlases is easy and will bring you good fortune. Tweaking graphics to avoid transparent regions, however, is more time-consuming. Lastly, creating your own UI shaders might bring you big gains but at a big cost.
      Remember, saving a few microseconds in your game might not be worth if it costs you weeks of your life-time and your application does not need it. This should not be taken as an excuse to never care; optimizations in the future are more expensive than in the present.
      Profile before you optimize Keep profiling Go for the biggest gains for the buck first  
      Level 3 Unity UI Developer: The Guru's UI Development Diagram
      Level 3 Developer: The Sweet Spots
      From the Venn Diagram, you might see several sweet spots where you could find yourself in: Fine-Grained UI Development, Coarse-Grained UI Development, Massive PP and Balance.
      They sounded quite obscure to me at the beginning, but then, with time, it all started to make sense to me. Experience brought understanding.
      What I still hold true is that, the more tools you know, the better. This is the main way I am able to recognize the subtle patterns in all problems. And, when you recognize the heart of the challenge, you know which tool to take out of your toolbox.
      Nothing will help your team more than having a developer possessing both a high-level overview of UI and an eye for detail.
      A Level 3 developer would confidently answer important practical questions that only come through experience. I can think of a few that any client could ask you:
      Here's a UI architecture for you. How performant is it? What are 3 alternatives I have to optimize this user interface? Can you show me numerical proof?
        You see, I prepared a few Unity examples for you.
      The examples you will have access to illustrate each of the UI optimization methods I propose.
      Not only that, I analyzed them all so you can feel safe the information is accurate.
      Because... do you know what comes after speaking out of our gut feelings? Speaking with certainty, based on real experience.
      So, are you serious about becoming a Level 3 Unity UI Developer?
      ---> Grab Now the Level 3 Guide from my Blog Post.
    • By JeremyAlessi
      Jeremy continues October with some more Halloween spirit by attempting to go bodyless and pass off green screen artifacts as monster makeup! Reggie Fils-Aime enters the Video Game Hall of Fame and is honored with a lifetime achievement award. The industry mourns the loss of John Kirby, who at one point saved Donkey Kong and possibly Nintendo as we know it today. Jeremy also covers the latest PixelFest 2020 developments and gets techy with Castlevania IV ... though he's still not done yet.
      And... drumroll... Jeremy completely forgets to mention that there will be a PixelFest Devs meetup on Tuesday, October 15th at Pixels = Pints + Bytes in Norfolk, VA. Be there ... or you're going to need an extra life MUAHAHAHA!
       
       
       

      View full story
    • By JeremyAlessi
      Jeremy continues October with some more Halloween spirit by attempting to go bodyless and pass off green screen artifacts as monster makeup! Reggie Fils-Aime enters the Video Game Hall of Fame and is honored with a lifetime achievement award. The industry mourns the loss of John Kirby, who at one point saved Donkey Kong and possibly Nintendo as we know it today. Jeremy also covers the latest PixelFest 2020 developments and gets techy with Castlevania IV ... though he's still not done yet.
      And... drumroll... Jeremy completely forgets to mention that there will be a PixelFest Devs meetup on Tuesday, October 15th at Pixels = Pints + Bytes in Norfolk, VA. Be there ... or you're going to need an extra life MUAHAHAHA!
       
       
       
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