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Civility and Comments

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Washu

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Why can't people be polite with each other on these forums? I mean, I see responses all the time now which are basically disguised flames. Is there some reason you can't just say what needs saying and be done? Do you really have to call each other names? Now, that's not to say you can't insult each other, but blantantly calling every poster before you an idiot, and then expressing your opinion, no matter how right or wrong it is, is not really appropriate. Especially on the technical forums, where you are expected to behave like a rational adult. Sometimes I wonder just what some of you think "rational" means. Opinions?

I've also noticed that I get quite a few hits, but little or no comments. Well, I like comments, they tell me if I am going in the right direction, or if I've forgotten something, or better yet, if someone has a better idea that I can snatch. So please, feel free to comment, or ask questions, I am more than happy to answer them. In fact, there is nothing quite like a good comment which points out an error, or suggests an alternative path, to wake up the mind.


Well, as you may recall last time, we had in our testing code a function which would return a NetworkFormatter. As I recall, it went something like the following:
Quote:

private NetworkFormatter GetFormatter() {
System.Reflection.Assembly sharedAssembly = typeof(Kent.Shared.Vector).Assembly;

NetworkFormatter formatter = new NetworkFormatter(sharedAssembly);
Assert.IsNotNull(formatter);

return formatter;
}

This code has a minor problem with it. Specifically, it ties our formatting tests to our shared library, a dependancy that we don't need. So, lets add an object to our tests, we'll call it SerializableObject, it shall contain an integer and a string. For now this will do as a simple test object. We also shall change the above function to match the new code:
Quote:

private NetworkFormatter GetFormatter() {
System.Reflection.Assembly sharedAssembly = typeof(SerializableObject).Assembly;

NetworkFormatter formatter = new NetworkFormatter(sharedAssembly);
Assert.IsNotNull(formatter);

return formatter;
}

Quote:

namespace Kent.Serialization.Network.Tests {
[Serializable]
public struct SerializableObject {
public SerializableObject(int value, string name) {
this.Value = value;
this.Name = name;
}

public int Value;
public string Name;
}
}

This removed our need to depend on the shared assembly. Problem sovled [grin].

We can successfully enumerate the serializable types in our assembly, so the next step should be assigning IDs to the types. The best choice it would appear, at this point in time, would be to use the array index. Thus the first object should be our SerializableObject, so lets test this assumption:
Quote:

[Test]
public void GetTypeIDTest() {
NetworkFormatter formatter = GetFormatter();
Type[] types = formatter.GetSerializableTypes();
Assert.AreEqual(types[0], typeof(SerializableObject), "Expected the first entry to be SerializableObject");
}

Running our tests, we see that this is indeed the case. However, we really should be able to wrap this up in a method which, when passed an ID, will give the type. To do this we will need to add a member to the NetworkFormatter, and ensure that GetSerializableTypes is called before the new method.
Quote:

public NetworkFormatter(Assembly sharedAssembly) {
this.sharedAssembly = sharedAssembly;
serializableTypes = GetSerializableTypes();
}

private Type[] serializableTypes;

Now we can add our new method, called GetTypeFromId:
Quote:

internal Type GetTypeFromId(int id) {
try {
return serializableTypes[id];
} catch (IndexOutOfRangeException) {
throw new SerializationException("Type not found for ID: " + id);
}
}

Next we should refactor our test to use this new method, which is easy enough to do:
Quote:

[Test]
public void GetTypeIDTest() {
NetworkFormatter formatter = GetFormatter();
Assert.AreEqual(formatter.GetTypeFromId(0), typeof(SerializableObject), "Expected the first entry to be SerializableObject");
}

Now we have to find some way of querying the ID of a type. The simplest way to do this is to map Types to integers, using a Dictionary object. But first, the test.
Quote:

[Test]
public void GetIdFromTypeTest() {
NetworkFormatter formatter = GetFormatter();

Dictionary typeIdMap = new Dictionary();
Type[] serializableTypes = formatter.GetSerializableTypes();

for (int i = 0; i < serializableTypes.Length; ++i) {
typeIdMap.Add(serializableTypes[0], i);
}

int id = typeIdMap[typeof(SerializableObject)];

Assert.IsTrue(id == 0, "Expected the ID of SerializableObject to be 0, found {0}", id);
}

Simple enough, it just loops through each type and adds it to the map, along with it's associated ID. However, this really belongs as a few methods under the NetworkFormatter, so first lets add a GetTypeIdMap(), We should also alter our test to be in terms of this new method.
Quote:

public NetworkFormatter(Assembly sharedAssembly) {
this.sharedAssembly = sharedAssembly;
serializableTypes = GetSerializableTypes();
typeIdMap = GetTypeIdMap();
}

internal Dictionary GetTypeIdMap() {
Dictionary typeIdMap = new Dictionary();
Type[] types = GetSerializableTypes();

int id = 0;
foreach (Type t in types) {
typeIdMap.Add(t, id);
++id;
}

return typeIdMap;
}

private Dictionary typeIdMap;

Quote:

[Test]
public void GetIdFromTypeTest() {
NetworkFormatter formatter = GetFormatter();

Dictionary typeIdMap = formatter.GetTypeIdMap();

int id = typeIdMap[typeof(SerializableObject)];

Assert.IsTrue(id == 0, "Expected the ID of SerializableObject to be 0, found {0}", id);
}


That's about all for now. Next time we'll look at some refactorings that need to be done to the NetworkFormatter.
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4 Comments


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True that..... And I'll be sure to read through your journal more often. I might even make a post or two, even though it may be meaningless.

Well, here's your meaningless post..... I find I read other people's journals if they have posted on my journal in the recent past (subtle hint). It's kind of a hard method though as there are just so many now.

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Well, Mr. Washu, I bet you would be suprised if you found the average age of the poster at GD. I bet it is pretty young. And in truth, there is no telling, because the internet is nice and anonymous like that.

Nothing is more comforting to a coward than anonymity.

P.S. I <3 Your Journal

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Quote:
True that..... And I'll be sure to read through your journal more often. I might even make a post or two, even though it may be meaningless.

Well, here's your meaningless post..... I find I read other people's journals if they have posted on my journal in the recent past (subtle hint). It's kind of a hard method though as there are just so many now.

Oh, I read your journal, and I should post some comments, I agree, I'm just as guilty as others.

Quote:

Well, Mr. Washu, I bet you would be suprised if you found the average age of the poster at GD. I bet it is pretty young. And in truth, there is no telling, because the internet is nice and anonymous like that.

Oh, I will admit that many of our members are pretty young, but that still doesn't mean they can't act mature. I also know that many of our members are older, yet they act just like children as well.
Quote:

Nothing is more comforting to a coward than anonymity.

Unfortunantly, you aren't as anonymous as you think, one person especially comes to mind. But I suppose you are right, the illusion of anonymity does tend to bring out the worst in some people. *sigh*
Quote:

P.S. I <3 Your Journal

Why thank you [grin]. I think you've just made my day.

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*ssshhh*, Dont tell anyone but I'm just dropping in to say that I think your journal is the greatest source of knowledge in the Plane of Journals and Threads...Thats some very detailed and informative stuff you have there. I dont know how you manage to keep it up and at that level of detail too, all I can say is nicely done. Some of us are reading.

Now that the formalities are over I think you it fair to warn you that I plan to ursurp or at least rival your journal as a source of information. Prepare yourself, mortal...[grin].

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