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Functional Cam System

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A more cinematic experience...

I've finally implemented the trigger based camera system. All cameras and triggers are created and exported from a Max tool. The exported (xml) data is loaded by the game level object. The level object holds a list of scene objects each of which has a unique scene camera system object. Blah blah.. Anyway, the cool thing is that we now have a more cinematic experience as the character moves throughout a scene. The view is interpolated between cameras according to the character's position in the scene. Cameras move along each axis at specific speeds relative to the character's position from the camera's original look at point. Below you can see a side view of the test scene as it looks in Max.



The main advantage to such a system is flowing uninterrupted camera movement. You can watch a wmv movie of it in action if you're interested. [movie]

I could release an isolated version of this camera system if anyone is interested.
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The main advantage to such a system is flowing uninterrupted camera movement. You can watch a wmv movie of it in action if you’re interested.

That movie was awesome. You telling me that the camera movement is done dynamically in real-time, and that it wasn't some scripted path?

Quote:
I could release an isolated version of this camera system if anyone is interested.

Not sure that I'd personally have a use for it right now, but I wouldn't mind reading some more about it.

Did you base your algorithm(s)/design on some existing stuff? or is it just another noaktree > *.* type moment? [smile]

Jack

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Thanks Jack.
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You telling me that the camera movement is done dynamically in real-time, and that it wasn't some scripted path?
That's mostly what I'm saying. The general camera angles for areas are scripted (using the Max tool) but the actual position and rubber banding are calculated in real time.

I saw it done on that Lego Star Wars game and thought it was an amazing way to move through the scene. [smile]

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Thanks Jack IV
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It's things like these that make me wish I was into 3D
So why don't you start with a few simple tutorials in DirectX and see if you still wish you were into 3D. I know you've got that bad-ass computer. [wink]

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That was spifferific! One thing, though... It doesn't seem like the system will scale well to arbitrary 3D environments without incredibly careful placement of enemies: in more than one segment, the camera remains in front of the ogre whereas the majority of third-person games would need it to smoothly wrap around to a follow mode.

Still, the rubber-banding is excellent work. How does it handle dynamic camera angles defined as relative to the avatar position and orientation?

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