• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    195
  • comments
    198
  • views
    104085

Game devlopment school week 1.

Sign in to follow this  

367 views

So, in the interests of keeping my academic software discount, I usually try to keep enrolled in courses at my local community college. Last semester I took 2D Computer Animation, which didn't turn out to be about what I expected, but was interesting nonetheless. This semester I've enrolled in Game Programming I, a pilot course that the college is using to help develop a curriculum for a two year game development degree. Yesterday was the first day of class, and I have come to the conclusion that I'm a tad bit overqualified for the course. However, for those of you interested in seeing what actually happens in a game development course, I've decided to write about it here. (Since I'm not doing anything else with the journal space anyways.)

The primary tool for the course appears to be Game Maker. The college seems to have gone and bought a number of licenses so that we're using the registered versions. (Naturally, the computer I was on had the unregistered version for some bizarre reason.) The text book is Andrew Rollings and Ernest Adams on Game Design. However, the course is focused on game development, not game design, so it looks like we're only covering the first third or so of the book, and most of the rest of the course will be focused on practical development via Game Maker.

The first class dealt primarily with administrative details and technical problems for the first half. We're using computers with removable hard drives for the lab work, and if you've ever dealt with removable hard drives, you know what kind of troubles can result. Especially when dealing with people who have never dealt with removable hard drives. I personally thought it would be intutively obvious for everyone to power down the machines before taking out the drive, but that seems not to be the case.

From there we played with the demo games that are packaged along with Game Maker to get an idea of what Game Maker is capable of, and then did a group exercise to identify points that make for a good game. (First small groups, and then as a class merging the lists of the small groups.) After that we downloaded and installed the game "Chicken Attack" from MSN Games and played that for a while.

Assignment for next week: Write a one to two page review of "Chicken Attack" and read chapters one and two of "Andrew Rollings and Ernest Adams on Game Design". Woo hoo.
Sign in to follow this  


5 Comments


Recommended Comments

Quote:
However, for those of you interested in seeing what actually happens in a game development course, I've decided to write about it here.

I like that plan [smile]

I never wanted to do one of these games-specific degrees or whatever, but I've been curious about what actually gets taught on one (okay, I know yours isn't a degree, but the point still stands...).

Jack

Share this comment


Link to comment
With Game Maker over here in Australia, one school that I do Server work for actually contacted the authors and managed to find out that they could install the unregistered version on each of the machines and let the kids use it to create games. There was no need to purchase a license for the use in this way even if there were going to be classes where the kids were making games for assessment purposes. This may be the case for the Community College too.

I have seen some really good games come out of Game Maker from these kids, though I don't think anything quite compares to developing the underlying code... But then I guess real programmers and programming lovers have always been a rarity around here (I have met 3 and know about 10 through the internet in Australia. Such a shame to have such a small number of dedicated fellows)

Share this comment


Link to comment
I was interested in taking a game degree course a few years ago, but decided (after looking at tuition and cost and assessing that I was poor) that it probably wouldn't be the best course of action. I think it's a great idea however to take a course such as the one your taking, especially as you have experience and can really help mold the curriculum for future students, good luck with that. I'll keep reading too as it is interesting, I ended up going for a programming degree as it was a lot more affordable and will allow me (hopefully) to work in various fields.

Share this comment


Link to comment
I was interested in taking a game degree course a few years ago, but decided (after looking at tuition and cost and assessing that I was poor) that it probably wouldn't be the best course of action. I think it's a great idea however to take a course such as the one your taking, especially as you have experience and can really help mold the curriculum for future students, good luck with that. I'll keep reading too as it is interesting, I ended up going for a programming degree as it was a lot more affordable and will allow me (hopefully) to work in various fields.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Advertisement