• 09/22/17 09:08 PM

    IGDA gets a new Interim Director: Jen MacLean

    GameDev Unboxed

    Back in June, the International Game Developer Association (IGDA for short) had their Director, Kate Edwards, step down. Known to her followers as a fearless, headstrong leader, Edwards finished her fifth year on a strong note, having stood up to controversies like diversity in the game industry, unpaid “crunch” time, and the Gamergate menace.

    Since then, the IGDA has been without an official Director. In the meantime, Beamdog co-founder Trent Oster has served as interim Executive Director until a suitable replacement was found.

    As of this week, Jen MacLean is the new Interim Executive Director of the IGDA. With big shoes to fill, she fills them well. Starting her career in 1992 at Microprose, she worked alongside industry greats like Sid Meier and Brian Reynold. She joined AOL, at its height, in 1996, where she took the position of Programming Director of the “Games Channel”. She went from there to Comcast as the Vice President and General Manager of Games. She went up the ladder and eventually became CEO of the now-defunct 38 Studios.

    Since then, she has remained a loyal member of the IGDA, speaking at multiple IGDA events. She has taken the role of IGDA Foundation head in the past year, as well, which is the IGDA’s charity for game developers. She’s been featured across the industry as a true influencer, even going as far as being  presented in both "Game Industry's 100 Most Influential Women" by Next Generation as well as being named one of the top 20 Women in Games by game industry publication Gamasutra.

    Qualifications galore, MacLean brings 25 years of knowledge and experience to the role, working her way up the IGDA for this. With 8,000 members in the IGDA, spanning across 190 chapters and Special Interest Groups, MacLean is expected to stay on until at least March 2018, when another Director will be implemented. 

    Jen MacLean will be joining the Power-Up Digital Games Conference this October 25th to 28th, talking about her role, her past experiences, and the future of gaming. Check it out in the official PDGC Discord server!

     



      Report Column Entry


    User Feedback

    Create an account or sign in to leave a review

    You need to be a member in order to leave a review

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now

    There are no reviews to display.


  • Similar Content

    • By Big Impact Sound Composer for Media
      Big Impact Sound | Composer for Media
       
      provides royalty free music and sound design for media, games, television, film, trailers, commercials, documentaries, YouTube creators, exhibits, websites, slide shows, corporate projects, podcasts, wedding albums, presentations, audiobooks, radio, apps and so much more.
      Royalty free music
      Big Impact Sound allows you to distribute the royalty free music worldwide  and without any additional fees.
      Our music licensing system is transparent and easy:  once the music license is paid there are no copyright issues.
       
      Wide range of musical styles
      Our award winning team has more than two decades of experience in the creation and production of contemporary and classical music.
       
      Composition on demand
      Custom-made composition and sound design that will maximize the impact of your game, movie, commercial, trailer, documentary or presentation.
       
      Music productions ranging from single tracks to full orchestral scores
      We can provide single tracks or full scores and our team helps you with your project
      from start to finish according to your specific wishes.
       
      Stock Music (Library Music)
      Fast and easy music and sound design browsing in our huge music library. All our tracks are immediately available for any of your projects.
       
      Fast turnaround time
      We are used to work with tight deadlines and will help you meet them. We are passionate about our work and always aim for perfection.
       
      Contact us (by PM or by the website) to discuss how we can enhance your project with a distinctive sound identity.
      https://bigimpactsound.com/
       
       
       
    • By AxeGuywithanAxe
      Hey all, with the announcement of House Marque ditching their current game engine to use Unreal Engine , http://www.playstationlifestyle.net/2017/12/05/housemarques-next-game-will-use-unreal-engine-4/, I wanted to ask how everyone feels of the current state of commercial and custom game engines in the AAA and Indie Space. It seems like more and more studios are starting to switch to commercial engines, either Unity or UE4. Square Enix is creating Kingdom Hearts , Dragon Quest, and FF Remake in Unreal Engine, Rare is using UE4 for Sea of Thieves, Bend is using Unreal Engine for Days Gone, Insomniac Games used Unity for their smaller titles, and the list continues.
      As a graduate student that is about to graduate, I just wanted to see if the concept of fully creating a game from scratch is becoming a dying breed for engine developers, and I should focus more on creating my projects using these more popular engines, especially from a portfolio perspective. Thank you.
    • By Joseph Perez
      Hi! Ever since I was a kid I was always fascinated by games, I believe we all were and still are. There was a certain mystique while playing a game, something that helped us all in someway. I'll never forget playing the original super Mario bros and then going to super Mario 64 and wanting to collect all the stars just to see Yoshi! This is something I want to replicate, I want to make a game that people will enjoy. I know absolutely nothing about game design and I don't want to come off as ignorant when I say I want to make a large open world game. I understand it may be an insane amount of work, possibly unrealistic/impossible for a small team. But that's what I want to know, if anyone could be real with me and tell me the realistic amount of time, people, and money I would need to make a large open world game. I understand that it being my first game is unrealistic but that's my end goal and I just want to know the specifics of it. I greatly appreciate anyone who gives any tips or information. I'm grateful that such a community exists.