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  3. I use a text file as a todo/scehdule/agile/ideas. Works for me.
  4. AireSpringfield

    [D3D11]Access Depth Buffer using SV_Depth

    So by my understanding, SV_Depth is useful only when writing custom depth values, but CANNOT be used to achieve custom reading. When writing to SV_Depth, the pipeline discard to write to depth buffer with z/w in SV_Position, which is the default. Am I right?
  5. Dan DAMAN

    How to avoid bugs

    I find the best way to prevent bugs is to write code that's easy to understand. Do what you can to make your intentions obvious through your code. Whatever you can't make obvious document via comments. Short term this helps prevent bugs since you can "gut check" your code to see if it's doing the right thing more easily. In team situations it makes the code easier to review as well. Most bugs IME are due to simple oversights when writing up code. The harder you have to work to "get" the code the more likely you are to miss a detail which leads to a bug. Longer term when you go back to revisit old code simple code helps even more. The more easily you can figure out what you were trying to do the less likely you are to add new bugs or bring back old bugs. A few suggestions Code small features one at a time, don't do too much at once. Work out how you want your small feature to work before you write it. Source control gives you a nice way to undo your changes and start over if you're completely stumped. Keep your functions short with few arguments. Keep your functions independent of each other whenever possible. Functions calling each other is fine but having something like prepareFoo then doFoo is more likely to lead to bugs since you could forget to call prepareFoo or make other mistakes. Avoid having widely shared data that can be modified in many places (e.g. global variables, singletons etc.) Avoid duplication of code. Fixing a bug once is enough work. Fixing lots of the same bug is an exercise in frustration. Fail hard and loud on unacceptable program data. The quicker a bug leads to a catastrophic event the easier it is to find and fix. This is what can go wrong if you don't throw up huge error messages or outright crash on bad input: https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2018/07/a-years-old-one-letter-typo-led-to-aliens-colonial-marines-awful-ai/ As other posters have said, you will get bugs still, but simpler code should make them easier to find and fix.
  6. Hodgman

    [D3D11]Access Depth Buffer using SV_Depth

    MSDN has some weird things to say about reading from output semantics... I think that wording means that you can read any value that you have written into it IIRC, to get the depth value of a fragment you want: float4 frag (Vert2Frag v2f, float4 pos : SV_Position) : SV_Target { float depth = pos.z / pos.w; return half4(depth, depth, depth, 1); } This isn't the same as sampling the depth buffer - this is reading the value that was just written into the depth buffer. To sample from a depth buffer, you create a SRV for it and sample it like any other texture. If you want to sample from the currently-bound depth buffer, you need to bind it with a read-only DSV and make sure that your draw calls have depth-writes disabled.
  7. Hi, We know that it is possible to modify the pixel's depth value using "System Value" semantic SV_Depth in this way: struct PixelOut { float4 color : SV_Target; float depth : SV_Depth; }; PixelOut PS(VertexOut pin) { PixelOut pout; // … usual pixel work pout.Color = float4(litColor, alpha); // set pixel depth in normalized [0, 1] range pout.depth = pin.PosH.z - 0.05f; return pout; } As many post-effect requires the depth value of current pixel (such as fog, screen space reflection), we need to acquire it in the PS. A common way to do that is to render the depth value to a separate texture and sample it in the PS. But I found this method a bit clumsy because we already have depth value stored in the depth-stencil buffer, so I wonder whether it is possible to access from NATIVE depth buffer instead of ANOTHER depth texture. I found this on MSDN: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/direct3dhlsl/dx-graphics-hlsl-semantics that mentions READ depth data in shader. I tried this in Unity: half4 frag (Vert2Frag v2f, float depth : SV_Depth) : SV_Target { return half4(depth, depth, depth, 1); } However it turns out to be a pure white image, which means this depth values in all pixels are 1. So is that MSDN wrong? Is it possible to sampling a NATIVE depth buffer? Thanks!
  8. Brandon Sharp

    Geforce 370z

    Made this back in 2017 when i had a super computer. Not sure of the poly count but I know it was crazy. Fans all were spinning had some cool animation of exhaust from the NOS tanks. Will redo this eventually for my game and it will turn into a Drone type bot.
  9. Brandon Sharp

    Neon Signs & Objects

    Some neons I did. Not to bad for being my first time. The lighting was the hardest part to get right. Let me know what you think and if you have a better technique than I do. All i use is a luminescent over a transparent material.
  10. Brandon Sharp

    Pixar Type Render

    This is a few renders of a small city i did made up of mostly Pixar stuff and a few other characters from different things. These are all old now I just looked at the date and its 5/11/17. Its 8000x5000 and has lots of hidden stuff. Can anyone find Plankton ? I did everything from scratch and for a year ago till now I still think I did a great job. Let me know what you think.
  11. Zakwayda

    First person camera controller

    Have you seen any applications that implement the kind of interface you have in mind, even in part? Or are you more or less trying to come up with something new from scratch? Also, if you haven't already you might check the Unity asset store. I tried searching there for 'first person touch', and a few things came up. They might not have what you're looking for of course, but it might at least be worth checking.
  12. Zakwayda

    Looking for feedback on my space scene

    Another vote for sticking with your current general approach. (If I saw a game with that aesthetic I'd certainly be interested in trying it.)
  13. Thanks for your feedback men. I didnt know, that i mislead about the genre. "Orchestral/Cinematic Music Composition" would be better ?
  14. sprotz

    Worst time of your life as an indie

    GMS? Game Maker Studio? I used Game Maker 8. I had no choice at the time (2008)
  15. I agree, the label horror music doesn't seem to fit the music you've presented here. Perhaps a certain kind of game with a somewhat spooky atmosphere but not true horror... like an FPS with zombies. But when you consider real hallmarks of video game horror like Silent Hill or Resident Evil - this feels like a different style. This feels more like Ghost n' Goblins. More action oriented instead of creating suspense, which so many horror film OST do well. I hope that makes sense. Compare your music to The Ring - This is Going to Hurt with the tension and unease the music portrays. And that ragged, uneven cello playing and how creepy - getting right underneath your skin. Even less horror but more mystery in the Sixth Sense soundtrack: Even the songs that have more groove still have a bit more tension and leave more space. Like this cue in Silent Hill 3 OST: And some of it doesn't even have to really resemble "music" like much of the original Silent Hill OST does: Outside of the game, it's really hard to even listen to. But while in the game, it makes the experience so complete and creepy. It works beautifully. My advice is to spend a bit more time studying horror OST for both films and games and seeing if that's truly the kind of label and music you want to create. If not - that's totally fine! Labeling your music effective is highly important! If you get off from that by too much it can set up poor expectations of possible clients or even poor communication with current clients. I hope that helps.
  16. DarkRonin

    Worst time of your life as an indie

    Actually, the 3D performance in GMS is exceptional. I have managed to do some pretty complex things and keep the frame rate above 1000 FPS. But yes, if your objective is a 3D game, GMS is a very poor choice for a 3D engine.
  17. jbadams

    Worst time of your life as an indie

    I mean, it's an explicitly 2d engine, bit of an odd technology choice for a 3d game... Kind of impressed you managed to make a full 3d game with it, but poor performance should probably be expected in that scenario.
  18. sprotz

    Worst time of your life as an indie

    It was right after the development of my first 3D game 'Gangs of London' which right after release, it got abysmal reviews. It could barely run on some PCs and was not even playable on most. It had an average framerate of 4fps thanks to game maker's incompetent 3D engine and the models were indeed poor. All those four months of development including the modelling of a huge but largely empty world boiling down to this. The later game "Gangs of New York" was a significant improvement but still laggy, also using game maker's engine.
  19. Yesterday
  20. Hello everyone. This is my first time on these forums. I'm submitting my first released game called "Dawn Unto Dusk". You can play it in your browser. You can find it here: https://klaviam.itch.io/dawn-unto-dusk. Dawn Unto Dusk is a text adventure game that throws you out in the middle of nowhere. You will need to gather resources, such as food and tools, that you will need to survive. If your hunger meter runs out, you will die. Stumble upon vast, hidden temples that hold both riddles and puzzles. Discover the lore and mysterious of the land. Engage in dynamic game play where mechanisms you activate in one part of the island affect some place else. Go cut some vines! Listen to the soundtrack here. If you have any questions, comments, or issues, please do be sure to reply. I would like to know what you think.
  21. That is one of those 'it depends' questions. If your primary purpose is to ship games then (generally) use a pre-rolled engine. Admittedly vast majority of people who use this forum want to build an MMO and be the next 'Notch'. If your primary purpose is to learn every aspect you can and shipping a game is distant secondary (if at all) then roll your own engine all the way baby! Personally, I have next to no interest in shipping games. If I do one day then good luck to me. But right now, no interest in games whatsoever. Having said that also, with the underlying knowledge of how DX9 and 11 works, it gave me the superior edge when using GameMaker in the past. If GM couldn't do something, that was a non issue for me, I'd just add the additional code via DLL. I made the engine do what it just can't do. If you start out on a pre-rolled engine, you are screwed if the engine doesn't do something out of the box and you don't know how to remedy that. So, I guess writing your own engine first should be a mandatory step in game dev. Once you have made a simple engine, then go use a pre-rolled one and appreciate what is going on under the hood.
  22. Brandon Sharp

    Looking for feedback on my space scene

    Lol so your criticizing my criticism on a crirtize forum ?... right
  23. Klaviam

    Dawn Unto Dusk

    Dawn Unto Dusk is a text adventure game that throws you out in the middle of nowhere. You will need to gather resources, such as food and tools, that you will need to survive. If your hunger meter runs out, you will die. Stumble upon vast, hidden temples that hold both riddles and puzzles. Discover the lore and mysterious of the land. Engage in dynamic game play where mechanisms you activate in one part of the island affect some place else. Go cut some vines! If you have any questions, comments, or issues, please do be sure to leave them in the comments. Feel free to message me as well. Listen to the soundtrack here: Enjoy the game!
  24. Scouting Ninja

    Learning to code

    You didn't mention what language you are learning? First there is the 4 main data types: Bool, Int, Float and Strings. These are the core of programming. Also learn arrays. After that you need to learn functions. These are short codes, for example a typical game function could look like this C#: public PlayerTakeDamage (int AmountOfDamage){ this.HealthPoints -= AmountOfDamage; //After taking damage see if player is still alive if (this.HealthPoints < 1) { this.IsAlive = false; } } You also need to learn classes, because these will allow you to make "objects" that can be used as data types or as structures for complex code. public class Vector2D(){ public float x = 0; public float y = 0; public Vector2D(float startX, float startY){ self.x = startX; self.y = startY; } } //Now you can use the new class as a data type Vector2D MyPosition = new Vector2D(10f,0.5f); Then loops will be a good idea. string Word = "Hello World"; void PrintEveryCharacter(string InText){ foreach (char Character in InText){ print(Character); } } //it will be used like this: PrintEveryCharacter(Word); //Ruturns H e l l o w o r l d After that you should know enough building blocks to start making a game.
  25. dreadedhippy

    Game project

    LOOKING FOR YOUNG(13-15 YEARS) DEVELOPERS WHO WOULD LIKE TO HELP WITH MY PROJECT I am a young developers looking for people like me who would like to help with my project. The project is a 3d paranormal sci-fi game with a robot as the main character and he is on a quest to save his owners and there are lots of adventures which he would go through to finally beat the bad guy.Please if you could help me on this game I would really appreciate it. You can contact me at discord by searching in dreadedhippy and sending me a friend request. I would gladly accept it.
  26. dreadedhippy

    Game project

    LOOKING FOR YOUNG(13-15 YEARS) DEVELOPERS WHO WOULD LIKE TO HELP WITH MY PROJECT I am a young developers looking for people like me who would like to help with my project.
  27. i was searching on Youtube on some Tutorials and i found this here maybe you are intrested in.He got a small community : https://discord.gg/kGrRQJ9 so you can join and follow his tutorials.. Very nice i guess it could be a good tutorial series. Deadly
  28. pretty balanced mix. I think you should have a bit reverb in there. Piano sounds too quantized. Horror music isn't something that comes to my mind when listening.
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