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Hi there, I''m new to this field but have (as with all the newbies on this board) a burning desire to do some games programming. Can anyone recommend 2 books (one VC++ and one games/DirectX8) that aren''t way over priced but still good. I''m familiar with a handful of other programming languages and am no stranger to OOP. Cheers for any help you can give.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I''m a newbie too, just finished a book called Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus by Andre Lamothe.

I''d recommend it, very easy read.
Covers direct X (6 i think but stuff is applicable to later versions) and comes with a ton of stuff on CD including MS Visual C++ 6! there are other books on the cd too. and 3d engines.

worth a look. uk price is about £30 on amazon.

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Hi Burmston. Here are the books I can recommend to you:

C++: C++ Primer Plus by Stephen Prata (SAMS)
VC++: Beginning Visual C++ by Ivor Horton (Wrox)

I don''t have any DirectX book at this moment so there is nothing to recommend. Just browse for some titles at Amazon and pick the one that best suits your needs. Good luck!

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Aren''t way pver priced... a computer book? Thats dang near impossible. lol

A book that I bought and have to be very instructional and well written is "the Zen of Direct3D Game Programming". The author, Peter Walsh, walks you step by step through it and you''ll have something on the screen within a few chapters The only problem is... $59.99...

A good C++ book is one by Diana Zak, which can be found at the course.com website. I used it as textbook and though it was pretty good. I don''t remember the title though...

The multiverse is sloppy... I just make it neat

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A lot of people here on these forums really like "Accelerated C++" though I haven''t read it myself (I don''t know the author). If you''re serious about C++, you really should have Stroustrop''s "The C++ Programming Language", written by the man who created C++.

ToTWGPG is an awesome book, thought the DirectX parts are a bit dated. However, it''ll give you a pretty solid background in general game design, basic AI, physics, etc...

The only downside is that I don''t think any of these books are under $50.

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quote:
If you''re serious about C++, you really should have Stroustrop''s "The C++ Programming Language", written by the man who created C++.


I don''t have the fortune of owning that book, but from what I have read it is more of a reference type of book for the seasoned c++ programmer, rather than the beginner. I''m not too sure about this though. (again, I dont own the book) Check out some reviews on amazon.com

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Gr, someone just posted a great link of free online books but I can't find it. I'm pretty sure its on the Beginner's forum somewhere though; look around a bit.

EDIT: nm, I found it here. Check out this thread; lotsa good links inside

http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=101295

I do recommend TOWGPG by LaMothe though; excellent book, and, like someone mentioned, it comes with the intro version of VC6++. A little pricey, but that compiler is probably worth the price alone.

[edited by - Peon on June 26, 2002 3:28:46 AM]

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quote:
Original post by masterg
I don't have the fortune of owning that book, but from what I have read it is more of a reference type of book for the seasoned c++ programmer, rather than the beginner.


Very true. I wouldn't recommend a newbie try to learn C++ from it, but it's a very nice addition to one's bookshelf.

[edit] Stroustrop also focuses a lot on the reasons behind many features of the language. It is definitely NOT an easy read.

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[edited by - Chem0sh on June 26, 2002 5:55:03 AM]

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Today I went to my local B&N to check out Stroustrop's "The C++ Programming Language" and confirmed my ideas. It is indeed not for the beginner. However, it has a fancy, cool-looking cover page. Quite an interesting quick read I had - especially due to it's focusing on the "reasons behind many features of the language"

[edited by - masterg on June 26, 2002 12:55:53 AM]

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I''m reading a book called "learn C++ in 21 days" (it''s online readable from: "http://members.tripod.com/~firstpod/cpp21/" ).
but I''m using visual c++ 6.0 and when I type the code standing in the book. Their are almost every rime errors. Can someone please tell me what I do wrong??




w i
TaJ TayTiS
tu h
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Guest Anonymous Poster
I learned C++ from Stroustrup''s book, though I already knew java. Took a week, I''m not boasting either (I mean why would an anon boast right?). So get Stroustrup''s book and just read it cover to cover. Even if it turns out that you can''t learn from it just put it aside because you do need to read the entire thing once. Buying a book on VC++ is not at all the same as buying a book on C++. They are entirely different. VC++ is a program, C++ is a language. A book on VC++ would be nice too if you have the money, but I am doing just fine without one.

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quote:
I''m reading a book called "learn C++ in 21 days" (it''s online readable from: "http://members.tripod.com/~firstpod/cpp21/" ).
but I''m using visual c++ 6.0 and when I type the code standing in the book. Their are almost every rime errors. Can someone please tell me what I do wrong??


You''re most likely just not typing the code in correctly.

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Good DirectX books: Tricks if the Windows Game Programming Gurus
The Zen of Direct3D game programming

------------------------------
BASIC programmers don''t die, they just GOSUB and don''t return.

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Buy the 2nd edition of TOTWGPG that just came out. Actually, it came out like 3 weeks ago but I''m still hunting for it in my local B&N. I think it''s updated to cover DX8, but don''t take my word for it.

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I must agree with most of the other post about a programming book. Totwgpg will give you a solid idea of what it takes to program a game. Even though some of it is out of date, the stuff everyone is doing now will be out of date in a year or two. Learing new things is part of programming. And learning how it was done in the last couple of years is good if you want to understand older code.

As for learning the c++ stuff myself, I am self taught, but now going through college. The book we use in class, "C++ programming today by Barbra Johnston" is very good, because it presents code written incorrectly, and the shows the error messages you get from a VC++ 6.0, and GCC Linux compiler, and then she explains what the errors really mean, and how to fix them. The are also sections in the first few chapters that show common begginer mistakes, such as:

if(x=0) // should be (x==0)

or

A || B && C || D which is really
A || (B && C) || D because the compiler evaluates the && first

I recomend this book not only because I know if I had it when I was trying to learn, I would have had many less sleepless nights, but also because the author is an instructor at my school, and she is a really good programmer.

Hope this helps

I think, therfore I am.
I think?

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I''d jot down all the books mentioned here and go to your local computer book store or major book store and look through those books and see which one you like more. It''s all mostly preference and your style of learning. Some dive right in, some pan things out more. Just sit down and skim through the first few chapters and read the introductions to those books and see which one fits you the best.



I know only that which I know, but I do not know what I know.

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