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Ketchaval

opponents = a temporary challenge.

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From thinking about the design of Chess, inspired by comments on the thread " Designing Chess (thx Sandman)." One thing that struck me, was that in most games, the various enemies of the game do not provide a lasting tactical challenge for the player! In most games, it will take the player a while to work out how to best deal with the enemy, and then they will decide - ah, it is best if one of my characters shoots at it from behind cover, whilst the other attacks in close combat and uses ''health restoring potions'' to counteract the damage. > Of course, the way in which the player deals with such an enemy will vary a little depending on the tactical situation (amount of cover available, other hostile creatures in the area). But after a while, most creatures in games can be dealt with in a fairly routine manner, and will not surprise the player. So what can be done to make in game creatures (and game rules) that can provide a long term challenge?

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I think the two problems here are the difficulty involved in making opponents adaptable to different situations and having different models for the opponents to adapt to.

Most of the work in gaming right now seems to be moving away from furthering AI and more towards linking real humans up with each other, since humans are the only truly adaptable opponents. Many games don''t have the particular element of strategy that a "perfected" model (like chess) has. Looking at MMORPGs specifically, you will see one or two main types of player-vs-player character templates played nearly exactly the same.

Again, its just my opinion; but if RPGs (continuing with the same example) came up with a strategic battle system with multiple ways to play out a battle, it wouldn''t be that difficult to have computer controlled opponents adapt to these new techniques. Unfortunately, this is why you see companies "nerfing" different character classes in their games. Its an attempt to balance the system so that there are multiple viable solutions.

Before I end, I''d like to use the same example of RPGs. In a multiplayer setting, if someone playing as a wizard keeps losing to other players that happen to all be knights, this player will most likely create a new character or alter his existing one to be on the same level with the knights. If you encounter the same computer controlled character in a game, chances are he would still succumb to the same techniques and not adapt to its shortcomings in battle.

My $.07

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I think the two problems here are the difficulty involved in making opponents adaptable to different situations and having different models for the opponents to adapt to.

Most of the work in gaming right now seems to be moving away from furthering AI and more towards linking real humans up with each other, since humans are the only truly adaptable opponents. Many games don''t have the particular element of strategy that a "perfected" model (like chess) has. Looking at MMORPGs specifically, you will see one or two main types of player-vs-player character templates played nearly exactly the same.

Its just my opinion; but if RPGs (continuing with the same example) came up with a strategic battle system with multiple ways to play out a battle, it wouldn''t be that difficult to have computer controlled opponents adapt to these new techniques. Unfortunately, this is why you see companies "nerfing" different character classes in their games. Its an attempt to balance the system so that there are multiple viable solutions. The difficulty is coming up with those solutions, and its similar to asking Verant and Turbine why they can''t re-invent chess.

I''d like to use the same example of RPGs. In a multiplayer setting, if someone playing as a wizard keeps losing to other players that happen to all be knights, this player will most likely create a new character or alter his existing one to be on the same level with the knights.

If you encounter the same computer controlled character more than once in a game, chances are he would still succumb to the same techniques and not adapt to its shortcomings in battle.

My $.07

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ugh, sorry about the double post but it won''t let me delete it. If a moderator sees this, can you delete the first post and this post?

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I get this nice error msg in IE:

There is a problem with the page you are trying to reach and it cannot be displayed.

*shrug*

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