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What should I make my first game?

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Hiyas, I''m just writing this to try and get some help figuring out what to write for my first game. I know everyone says start small and aim to make a tetris clone or something, but in a major way that kinda bores me and I know that if I attempt to do so, I''d probably lose motivation and start work on something else anyways. I mainly want to write an RPG but I know as a first project this is a majorly huge task and equally as well would probably never get finished. So I''d like to go for somewhat of a compromise. Something that is of a genre that interests me, without being so overly complex that it never happens. Any suggestions? I have a good knowledge of C++ and the DirectX API having written a 75 percent complete worldcraft .map parser and an almost complete Quake 3 BSP viewer. I just lack the experience at having made a complete game yet which is what I aim to do now. I''m thinking perhaps something along the lines of a hugely simplified RPG, something like a 3D Gauntlet clone. This would mean that I don''t have to worry about complex PC/NPC interaction (all interacion would be purely combat). As for maps, I''m stuck as to whether it''d be better to design a custom map maker that makes simple 3d maps, or whether to use my quake 3 BSP viewer. The reason I''m stuck is because of two points of view I have on the idea of pre generated maps. First off, using Quake 3 maps would make my life easier as the BSP and lightmap process is already done for me, this would make it easier to get a game up and running that looks very nice to boot. Conversly if I wrote my own simple map maker, things would not look as good, and probably wouldnt be as optimised, BUT I would have total understanding of the inner workings of the maps, I would be the one designing any lighting or visibility processes and would have a total knowledge of what exactly is going on with everything. So which is better, a pre-written format that I can use quickly, or my own format that may take longer but would be more deeply understood? Both I feel are important, you need to be able to get results quickly making a first game, if the format you use for levels is already made the game would be produced quicker, but could be slowed by not fully understanding everything about the format. If you use your own format, it would take longer to develop but the benefits of increased understanding of the inner workings might allow you to progress quicker overall. I''m not sure which sounds the better of the two options :/ I''m tending towards using the quake 3 BSP at the moment because I think writing a decent 3D editor would take a very long time compared to using an already existing editor, plus it would look a lot more visually appealing. Aside from that, what other ways could I simplify an RPG into elements that wouldn''t be too difficult to add into a first game? I thought of perhaps not allowing any projectiles as this would make the game physics a lot easier to cope with, but... I want spells and bows too much to take out that element. I guess I will pretty much make the game completely hack and slash/ click n cast. Though this would not make my ideal game, as a first project it would be much easier to cope with and not too difficult to expand upon later. Any thoughts on anything?? Cheers, Steve AKA Mephs

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You need to start small, I know what your thinking because I was thinking the exact same thing. I wanted to do an RPG or a strategy game right off the bat. However, there are elements and things you''ll learn by creating a Tetris clone or something similar that can be used later on. You need to take it step by step. There is so much involved in RPG games and such that will set your head a spin if you don''t have any experience. I''m sure you''ve probably tried already, as I did. Make a tetris clone, fiddle with animation and controls. Then tackle that RPG again. Trust me, it will be so much simpler.



I know only that which I know, but I do not know what I know.

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Ha, I knew it was coming but not so quickly. I don''t quite believe that though. I dont believe you have to make a tetris clone as your first game, I just believe it has to be something simple, and I believe that an RPG could be similified down enough to be manageable as a first project.

Why do all first games have to be tetris or the like are we that uninspired? Gauntlet was not much more complex than tetris. I think people are just too used to giving a pre defined answer instead of looking at an individual case... some of us simply find tetris dull, why MUST we be forced into making a clone of a game we don''t appreciate.

IMO theres nothing wrong in making a game of a different genre, so long as its not overly complex, the complexity level of the project is the key prt of whether it will get finished or not. Take a look at Jim Adams book on programming RPG''s, while for a first game I think theres too much to do an RPG of even that simple a level, but simplify it even more into a gauntlet clone and I''m certain it wouldnt be so hard to achieve. If anyone has read Jims book on programming RPGs , is it so imopssible to believe that as a first game you could make something of a similar level to what he produces in his book? I don''t believe so, but really I''m not looking to be told NOT to do this, I''m looking for ways to make things simpler so that it does get done. I''m already set on making something of this nature, so that is not an issue.

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quote:
Original post by Mephs
I don''t quite believe that though. I dont believe you have to make a tetris clone as your first game, I just believe it has to be something simple, and I believe that an RPG could be similified down enough to be manageable as a first project.

You can believe anything you want to. The evidence, however, is stacked against you.

quote:

Why do all first games have to be tetris or the like are we that uninspired?

You know what they say about genius - 1% inspiration...

All the inspiration in the world is pretty much worthless without implementation, and that''s where we hedge our bets on the unproven (ie, you and those like you). But since you''re so strongly opinionated, why''d you bother coming to ask here where you know we''ll give our rote replies of "start small, something like tetris..."? Go on, get out there and make a Gauntlet clone for a first game and prove us wrong (big deal; the principle is the same, but it''ll take you twice as long).

Everybody''s a visionary these days.

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Okay perhaps my thread was wrongly titled, I''m not asking what to make for my first game, but ways to make what I do want to do easier. I don''t have to prove myself to you or anyone, I just do what I do for me.

But, I''m willing to place my money where my mouth is, so I''m setting myself up a challenge, to produce a full gauntlet style 3D game in a given time frame. As to what time frame exactly I''m uncertain as like everyone I don''t have a great deal of spare free time. So lets take a tetris clone. Given my spare time I''d imagine I could create a reasonable tetris clone in roughly 5 weeks. Given the amount of free time I get, I think that would be about right. So thinking logically a gauntlet clone would involve AI, combat and different levels to fight over, perhaps more involved sound and a little extra thought towards interface. I imagine this would roughly triple the time needed for the tetris clone, so roughly 15 weeks plus a couple of weeks for the extra needed tweaking time due to more complex code. Now when working to a deadline I think I could roughly halve that time at the expense of some quality overall. So.... in order to try and get off my ass and get something full completed, I''m gonna set myself a 2 month deadline to try and create a gauntlet clone. Nothing polished or amazing, but a full game and a base to work from in future.

I''m interested to see how this will affect my decisions, but even if I dont succeed it will be fun to see if indeed it is possible as I think it is.

All I''m gonna say is check here over the coming 2 months and see how far I get

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I think what it boils down to is, if you think you can do it, then try and see what happens. If you fail, so be it. You still enjoyed the process of working on it. You have to enjoy *making* the game more than you expect to enjoy playing it, otherwise it won''t be worth it. From that standpoint, it hardly matters whether you succeed or not.

Take a look at the article on incremental development linked from the main page. Maybe start out with something extremely simple, take a look at Rogue for the simplest possible RPG. Try cloning it, but make your code modular enough that you can recycle most of the code for a tile-based graphical game later. You don''t have to implement everything you want all at once, if you try that you will never finish. If you want your game to be fully 3D, then you''ll have to throw away everything tile-based eventually, but you''ll still be able to keep things like inventory and the dialog generator.

You''ll end up replacing all the code in the whole project eventually anyway, so don''t worry too much about getting all the features the first time, or even support for all the features you want. Instead focus on making sure you don''t have any architectural problems that will make things impossible later. For example if you want to add multiplayer ability down the road then don''t tie the monster attacks directly to the player or you will never be able to deal with things like monsters having to choose a player to attack out of several. Instead of assuming the monster always moves right at the player, give the monster a ChooseTarget() function and a MoveToTarget() function so that later on, you can change ChooseTarget from a function that just returns the player to a function that queries the server for player data and chooses based on that.

No extra coding, just avoiding doing things wrong, and you can turn the small game you started with into the grand game you eventually want to have :}

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Making a game base where you can just run around and shoot at some stuff would not take that long. The problem is making a polished Gauntlet clone will take 25 times longer than a polished Tetris clone.

The basics won''t take that long, but all the levels, enemies, animations, etc will. It depends on how nice you want it to look and play.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
So the deadline is September the 1st, on this thread.

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Ahh but thats the beauty of using BSP files/X files/md3 files, if I use others work to produce my resources then I can potentially have a polished game up and running in no time at all as there are plenty of existing maps/characters. I''m not interested so much specifically in the creative design, only the game design from a programming perspective. Yes in time I want to implement my own characters and my own levels, but for now I''m happy to use others resources (only for myself, not commercially yet) until the programming side is a little more fleshed out. Once I have game structure in place, then and only then will I start looking at putting my own models and custom levels in. Actually levels may be a slightly different case but characters shouldnt be.

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ahh, make it the 18th September.... my birthday much better timing, it''d make a good present to myself to see something complete I can show off

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A link
Another one

Use the State design pattern - that''ll wrap up menus and other interface bits and allow you to separate the game logic cleanly. The idea here is that you have a class for the current game state with methods that may include "changeState", "create", "destroy", "update", "onKeyDown", plus any other useful functionality you can think of that''s common to all states. Each loop the game calls update for the current state and that state can control the logic. Each should represent a unique state of the game ("playingGameState", "MainMenuState", "DemoState", etc). The state transition is easier if you have them as singletons (so you would have could that may say, for example, "changeState(CMainMenuState::instance());" This sure beats the hell out of doing switch statements for the current state.

If you''ve not got a wrapper for an API then go to NeHe and grab yourself his code. Remember that you don''t have to make an engine when writing your game. If you think that something isn''t generic enough then don''t worry - there will always be another game in which you can make it more elegant .

Be sure to search these forums on a topic if you''re unsure because there''s more than enough examples for everything.

The most important thing is to do what you want - if you think that Tetris is beneath you then don''t do it, simple as that. Browse through the Hands-on forum to get the gist of basic games.

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All my programming already incorporates state and process based processing. It''s something which I picked up early from Jims book because I saw it was indeed a good thing!! Thus although my BSP viewer doesnt use the state based processing, the functionality for it to be used is already in my framework. Thanks for the hint though

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Ok, I have a very basic design document completed. It''s VERY rough at this stage, but will be updated, fleshed out and neatened up as my game progresses.

Quest 3K

The game

The game will feature 4 character classes:
Psionics
Paladins
Dreadnoughts
Cyborgs

Each class has their own strengths and weaknesses. Psionics can cast powerful spells to aid them in combat, but lack the ability to wear sophisticated armour; they are also poor at close quarter combat. Paladins are capable in all areas of combat, a jack-of-all-trades, and master of none. Dreadnoughts are heavily armoured mechanoids, harbouring a human deep amidst it’s technology, the human is so deeply engrained into the technology that he has become a part of it. So much so that neither the man, nor the machine may live without the other. They lack any close combat abilities at all but pack heavy ranged firepower, a bonus in wide open areas, but dangerous in close proximity where the splash damage may harm it, just as much as the enemy. Finally cyborgs are a little more proficient than paladins in all areas, but lack heavy armour.

Equipment will come in 4 types, one type per character. Some equipment may be used by all, others will only be usable by a specific class(es).

Types will be:

Armour:
Close combat weapons:
Ranged Weapons:
Spells:

Armour is divided into 2 types:

Large:
Dreadnought Standard
Dreadnought Reinforced
Dreadnought Energy field

Regular:
Flak Armour,
Powered Armour,
Combat Cuirassier

Close combat weapons are usable by Paladins and Cyborgs:
Chain Sword,
Power Blade,
Warp Claw.


Ranged weapons will be two types:

Heavy:
Rocket Launcher
Plasma Cannon
Chain Cannon

Personal:
Pistol,
Automatic Rifle
Plasma Rifle

Spells will be usable only by Psionics, who are only allowed bare basic equipment in other areas:

Mental Shield – protective psi shield that remains in place over time, draining Psi points in the process.

Raise Psi – regenerative spell, this spell allows the user to regain psi every second he spends standing still that he is not performing any other action or being attacked.

Translocate – Allows the user to teleport in a manner where distance = psi expended to cast

Psi-Force – Fires a burning ball of psi power towards the enemy, psi expended = damage done

Psi drain – Causes an enemy to become inflicted with an ailment over time which adds back to the casters psi points, but takes longer to achieve a kill than direct force

Summon Pyro swarm – Summons a swarm of fire energy that strikes the enemy very quickly over a small period of time, causing minor damage per hit.

PMP – Psionic Magnetic Pulse capable of disabling all lifeforms, electronic or biological for a period of time

That concludes the equipment section, this will of course be subject to balancing once the game is ready for this stage of development.

The objective: to make it through X number of levels collecting power pods that enable you to escape the hellish prison you’ve been cursed to endure. Power pods will be scattered throughout the levels and therefore the player will never know which ones are active or not active, so a psionic player could not simply translocate to every possible power pod without expending a great deal of psi points. As stated power pods may be active or inactive, inactive ones are useless. Activeness or lack of activeness will be defined at the beginning of a level randomly so that no level plays the same twice. Levels will also occur randomly, only the difficulty of the enemies will change. A level will be considered complete once the active power pod for that level has been found.

Levels

Levels will be created in Q3Radiant – They will be designed specifically for a top down viewpoint having only a single level rather than multiple levels. Weapon placement will be determined in the editor and read in via the BSP file entity list. Power pod locations will be determined by the same method, but the game will decide at run time which of these pods is the active one.

Models

Character models will be in the md3 format, as will weapons, power pods and enemies. Player start point will be determined by the info_start_position entity. Enemy placement will be standard for every map and also defined as an entity, as the player plays through more levels the difficulty level of the enemies will increase. This will be marked so that it is obvious to the player by the tint to it’s skin. Green tinted enemies will be easier, blue tinted enemies medium and red tinted enemies will be hard, black tinted enemies will be hardcore (the tinting idea is subject to change). Variations between the difficulty of enemies will of course be allowed but this will serve to show a general level of difficulty. You wont be set towards only ever fighting monsters of one level of difficulty at any given time, there will be a range of difficulty level monsters at any given time. This will be determined randomly with a tendency to make earlier monsters easier than monsters encountered later on. Harder enemies will have tougher armour, better damage weapons or more sophisticated spells.

Controls / Interface

The interface will be simple, no conversing with enemies, just click and kill!! Movement will be controlled via the arrow keys, weapons/spells will be selected with the numeric keys and actions will be targeted via the mouse clicks. Inventory will be dealt with in a simple manner, no complex inventory, you may hold any/all weapons available for your class at any given time but have a maximum limit on the ammo you may hold. Psi points will be allocated for those playing Psionics. Starting equipment allocated to those playing other classes.

Game engine

Firstly, the BSP viewer renders its faces as raw triangle fans rather than as meshes. This gives the problem that D3DX functions cannot be used for collision detection. Thus I will modify the engine so that a mesh is created for each face and so that the mesh is rendered rather than as raw triangle fans. This will then allow me to use the D3DX functions to determine if a model collides with a face and will easily allow for height variations even though essentially I’m using only a 2D map. Weapons will use a basic particle system for their effects, this saves time and allows me to design a few base particles for effects rather than complex 3D models, it also considerably would add to the speed over using meshes for the effects. AI will be simple, monsters fight dependant upon their type, if they favour ranged combat they stay as far from the player as possible while still being in range and take shot after shot, only moving if they feel they could extend their distance from the player and still remain in range. Close combat enemies run towards the player and attack all out, only running once they are obviously losing (as will be the case with all types), they will run until they have regenerated enough to resume combat. Monsters are less likely to run if they are in the presence of other monsters of equal or better power. Psionic monsters will act dependant upon the spells they have. Path finding will be done using a basic zombie homing system for now with monsters following waypoints until the player comes within their alert range. This can be expanded upon later to allow for more level responsive path-finding algorithms (dependant upon how well I am meeting time restrictions)

Sounds will be a simple matter of setting up directsound and playing the appropriate sound at the appropriate time, perhaps with some music if time suffices.

Players and monsters will be derived from a base character class to save rewriting a ton of code.

Menus will be state processed allowing the user to save the state of the game, load an old game or alter options. Character class may be chosen at the beginning of the game.

Character and monster classes will be based loosely on Jim Adams code and will keep track of any given characters current status and take care of keeping that character updated in the game dependant upon player input/AI decisions
….

Okay enough theory… time to code!!!



Like I say, don''t take it too seriously, it''s just a rough document to give some shape to what I''m doing but it should help to give a little focus and help get things done.... so here I go... I''m gonna purchase Quake 3 today so I can fully use Q3Radiant to make my levels, then I''m gonna begin implementing my collision detection and player models. This I''m expecting to take 4-7 days in total, mainly to get used to loading *.md3 files which I have no experience of at the moment.

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Phew.. I''m skeptical, but good luck.

I think Side Scroller are undervalued. Having spend the last couple of days playing Super Mario World on SNES, I wish there were more like it...

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Quite frankly, I don''t know if what I want is possible in such a time frame, but I wont deny it being possible until I''ve tried. Thus I''m setting myself such a time limit to encourage myself to get things done fast. They do say that things generally take at least twice as long as you''d hope for to complete, but even so, thatd be 16 weeks total... not too bad in my eyes. I really don''t care if I do have a full playable game in 2 months time or not, but thats what I''m aiming for, because... why not!? Even if I don''t have a compelete game, I''m sure that time frame is long enough to get something resembling a games basic elements. What I''m interested in seeing, is how much is possible in such a time frame. If I only get half of what I want done in that time I''d be extremely happy. We''ll just see how it goes I''m chillin out for the moment though cos I can''t do anything until I''ve seen how my BSP viewer reacts to my idea of how to custom design my levels to suit my needs. At present I have slight problems with the visibility data, but only in very large maps with multiple levels, this may not be the case at all with my custom maps and therfore I may be able to fix this issue at a later date. So the real work will commence tomorrow and the first major advances I suspect will occur towards the begining of next week as I have most time to code at the weekend. Watch this space...

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quote:
Original post by superpig
Phew.. I''m skeptical, but good luck.

I think Side Scroller are undervalued. Having spend the last couple of days playing Super Mario World on SNES, I wish there were more like it...


HEY! That''s what I''ve been playing lately, except on GameBoy Advance. I know that game so well from playing it on the SNES that I breezed through all 96 levels in about four hours.

I just need to find all 5 dragon coins on 3 more levels!! At least the additional mission (finding all the dragon coins) is easier than that of Super Mario Advance 1 (finding all the eggs).

Long live the 2-D platformer!!!

--TheMuuj

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Hmm, I don''t know, I''m having doubts. Not as to whether I''m capable, but I''ve been pondering more on the aspects of level design. I''m not happy with the limitations of existing BSP formats and the lack of flexibility of heightmaps. I want to produce my own level editor, but this most definitely would take a lot longer than my anticipated creation time. I''m not trying to weasel my way out of things but reality has provided a great kick in the teeth. I can''t obtain a copy of quake 3 as it does not seem to be in stock in any of my local shops (yet every time I''ve been in there with no intention of buying it, it was there) So I figured I could brave milkshape 3D if necessary to create my levels in X file format.... problem. For some reason when I load milkshape I am getting out of memory messages upon loading even after a complete reboot (very odd on a 128 MB system!!) To top it off, when it does successfully load, it will not load any models, the screen remains blank and the log file shows an error in loading any model I try to load. I think my system is a little messed up as it has always acted strangely, giving me very odd behaviour such as explorer windows being selected as active when I do not press a single key, IE 6 reporting errors and closing down for no apparant reason... but I had always been able to work under these weird occurances. I swear something is causing bad memory leaks somehow, god knows what, maybe a virus my scanner cant detect or perhaps just the gradual loss of stability of windows over time. I don''t wish to reinstall windows from scratch as I have no method to back up the large quantity of stuff I wish to keep and no guarantee the problems will be fixed forever (if at all), not to mention the length of time necessary to perform a complete reinstall (if I can even find my windows CD again!). This is not too much of a concern though, aside from Milkshape not functioning all the other little problems are manageable for now and kinda strange traits of my computer that make it unique . My main concern is my distaste at currently existing level editors and I don''t think I''ll ever be happy until I have created my own level/model file format. Problem is I know that this most certainly is a MAJOR task, but I really feel I need a model system that I totally understand and know inside out. I think my game idea is going to go on hold. Instead I am going to work on creating my own file format and editors, but this is quite a different task to creating a game, I''m well aware.

okay so upon that decision I would appreciate being pointed in the right direction for related tutorials. I am aware of the existing MFC tool creation tutorial that gamedev hosts and will read it further, any other relevant MFC/DirectX tutorials/sites or books would be much appreciated. I''ve tried ignoring this issue but I think I have to confront it head on... if I succeed then great.... if I don''t then.. well I had to try.. call it a part of the learning process. Call me strange but I feel using others tools is cheating myself. I know it isn''t but at heart somethings telling me it''s something I have to do!! Yup okay I''m one strange critter... sorry

So ya anyways... I take back my challenge for a later date... once I have a map editor up and running that I am happy with, I shall continue what I started.

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Ooh.. you''ll want to get used to using pre-built tools, if you entertain any hope of working in the industry (as opposed to just being a hobbyist). While it may feel like ''cheating'' to you, it saves time and resources in the long run. At the very least, you could try and start with an open-source tool and customize it to your needs. That way you''ll learn about the workings of a tool, without going through all the anguish of trying to get it to work.

Rather than just setting an end date, you''ll do much better - at any project - if you set yourself milestones. "The graphics system will be finished by Friday. The sound by next Wednesday." It''s difficult to estimate how long it''s going to take you to do each part - it gets easier if you have a full design doc, so you know exactly what you''re going to do before you start - but it forces you to stay on schedule the whole way through, rather than to just work slowly and then suddenly realise you need to rush to finish in time. Not to mention the feeling of achievement you get from reaching a milestone will help to boost your morale and keep you working on things.

MFC is a fairly obvious choice for tools - from my limited experience with it, it''ll probably do most of what you want. DDX in particular will come in handy. However, MFC is a beast to learn - if you''re trying to navigate your way through various file formats and techniques at the same time as learning it (assuming you''re not already comfortable with it), you''re probably better off sticking to what you know.

Seriously, if you''re still starting out, I''d avoid 3D as much as possible. There''s just too much added hassle there, and you need to concentrate on the rest of the game - that is, the bits that aren''t related to DirectX at all, such as the clock or game loop. You said that you "have a good knowledge of C++ and the DirectX API," which suggests to me that you''ve concentrated your efforts on learning them: I used to have a similar problem in that I knew the APIs back-to-front, and I could do anything with them; I just couldn''t bring it all together to make a game. If you can concentrate on the non-API stuff - things like the game state machine, AI, or memory handling - it''ll complement your existing knowledge. Remember, people who are DirectX experts don''t end up making games, they end up making cross-platform libraries so that *other* people can make games.

We don''t tell everyone ''Start with Tetris'' because we want to drive them away, you know.

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates
- sleeps in a ham-mock at www.thebinaryrefinery.cjb.net

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Perhaps, but if I could use Milkshape to produce .x files or if I could purchase Quake 3 I''d be able to work on the game... as it stands though I have no method of producing any levels at all because of my !!**&^% system plus the idea of creating the game tools kind appeals to me, MFC in itself doesnt. MFC as a tool to create what I want... does. I''ll look into it some more as I''ve found some decent tutorials and I''m pretty sure that a good level editor would manage a good hefty percentage of the game creation by itself.

It doesnt make a game in itself but I am intrigued.. especially after seeing Jims work in his book, in making basic MFC tools to get certain game related jobs done. ie Scripting, map editing, entity placement, spell creation etc etc. You know what I wish though? I wish MFC werent such a pain in the ass to learn, I wish it were more straightforward like Visual basic, yet could slot in my existing C++ code for directX without too much hassle. In such a simple environment I think I could get to making tools much easier using a simpler language to develop the windows interface while using the DirectX API just to control things like vertex selection etc etc. But MFC does seem to be the way to go.... so for now while I cannot obtain quake 3 (which I''m sure wont be forever!) I''m gonna brave and learn just enough MFC to suffice, and get to work making my own tools, even if just to say I''ve tried.

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quote:

This tutorial will show you how to create a very simple MFC program and how to customize it for your application. This program will be a base for other tutorials that I write for OpenGL and DirectX. I will be going through this tutorial in Visual C++ 6.0.



Wow, not bad when I was looking on a totally non game development related site for a general MFC tutorial!! Fate seems to be telling me this is a good move with every step I make... go figure

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Ok, I''ve just found my holy grail.... MFC was fun to dabble in to my surprise but having spotted in another thread reference to a program called Gmax (simpler 3DS Max designed for level and character creation) this would solve a lot of my problems!! ... hmm why does the word fickle spring to mind Ahh well, I''m going to investigate... my project is still on temporary hold until I find out more though, but I''ll still update when things start rolling.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I wanna play your gauntlet on September the 18th!!

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So do I!! but I was expecting to be using Q3Radiant.... now I have to learn an entire new package (no recent experience with 3D max) I''ll see what I can do, but until I am comfortable with GMax and loading its file format a game simply wont happen.. once I am comfortable I''ll start work with the same time scale. But don''t worry, I learnt Worldcraft almost entirely through in little less than 2 weeks, although I think my total sleep quota over the 2 weeks was about 10 hours , what can I say... I''m an Everquest fan.. personal best over 48 hours online without sleep while after an epic item (and man was that a killer!!).... but thats how much I love my games which in this industry is a valuable trait I''m sure... or just sad perhaps

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First game I made was a Slippery clone (that one with a work that eat lifes). Also an editor for the levels in tha game. It took me about 4 days but was a big step for me.
Pet.

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