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win32mfc

(RE:) How do I make games? A path to game development..

11 posts in this topic

I read the article (on this site) by Geoff Howland this evening: "How do I make games? A path to game development." http://www.gamedev.net/reference/design/features/makegames/ It got me thinking.. First, it''s a great article for what it says. Second, I consider myself a pretty good programmer & writing games is (let''s face it) about the best kind of programming you can do. I have a great idea for a game; but I want to get my feet a little more than damp before running off and designing something as in-depth as I have in mind. Because of that, and before I read the article above, I starting writing a DirectX game of Pong; complete with Title screen, menu''s and gameplay. I expect to have it polished off by this weekend. After reading Geoff''s article, I decided to walk the path he suggests. I think it''s a GREAT path to walk; because if you can do it, you''ve certainly accomplished something. If you _don''t want to_, I would ask myself why. In brief, you have to just WRITE A GAME. First an easy one, then a little harder, etc. This is what he suggests: (1) A Tetris game (2) A Breakout game (3) A Pac-Man game (4) A Super-mario game I started writing a souped-up "modern" version of PONG because it was an easy game to implement (game theory wise) and allows me to really get my feet wet with issues like designing the title screen, menu''s, pausing, etc.. These are issues that will come into play with any game you design; so doing it early with a game like PONG let''s you experiment (with a lesser amount recoding) and figure out the best way (for you or me) to accomplish it. THEN I THOUGHT... So.. After reading his article, I thought to myself that other people want to write games, too. Lots of people here. I got the idea in my head that I could design a web site (or sub-site here) for game programmers ''in training''. I think it''s a great idea. Anyone can join, and a user list would be available along with the projects they''ve completed. And a running vote available for the best game of each category (Pong, Tetris, Breakout, Pac-Man, Mario Bros, Galaga/Galaxian) A "Level" could be assigned each member based on how many projects they''ve completed & submitted. (Source code would be optional.) Maybe call it "Game Developers Guild" or something. New members with nothing submitted would be "Newbies", one project = "Apprentice", etc.. So what do YOU people think? I''m _definitely_ game! I plan on making my programs available anyhow; I think a central place where lots of people can do the same thing would also help a lot of other people get motivated. So many people get lofty game goals right from the start - before they''ve developed anything... and they end up developing nothing because it''s too large a project. Would love to hear your ideas & feedback on this one. // CHRIS (win32mfc) http://net-toys.8k.com
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It sounds like a cool idea to me. I''ll be one of the first there programming along with ya.

Were you thinking of creating tutorials for each game, or just throwing out an idea and letting everyone figure it out for themselves?
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You are very right Chris!
Newbies should concentrate on making a simple game and not a complex RPG (like I tried to do ). You must firstly grasp enough experience for level two, and then travel towards harder adventures...

I guess I''ll write a small complete game with a little of AI.

Anyway, I''m with ya!

--------------
Damjan Mozetic
http://estenwood.tripod.com/
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The idea sounds great, imo. Generally, I find it easier to work if there are small but set goals along the way. Anything to encourage helps.

A polar bear is a rectangular bear after a coordinate transform.
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Well, it sounds like it might be a good idea. I wonder
what the possibilities are for having such a forum hosted
here on GameDev.net Would be nice! I would be willing to moderate & keep the section up-to-date. If enough people like the idea, I''ll try and find the right admin person to pitch the idea to. Otherwise, I''ll set up a seperate web site for the whole thing; but I would much rather make it a part of GameDev.net -- this is such a great place to begin with!

Cheers!
// CHRIS
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Actually, this should already be in place with our current forums and our game development showcase:

http://www.gamedev.net/community/gds/

Something I would like to add would be a section in the members profile that shows how many games someone has done, and has links to them. So you can immediately see peoples work, in an organized way. Sort of like the "recent threads" or "contributions to the site" for those who have written articles.

-Geoff
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I also made a post along similar lines in the general forum only a few days ago. I was wondering if we could work together on the project?

I''ve got skills in automating some of the manual tasks of running web sites and I''ve run a starting out developers site before so I think we might be able to come up with some great ideas and more importantly implement them.
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A great idea!!! But why keep it just to programing?? Why not Artists and designers?? Programing is just part of making games.


Thorn
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First off, I''d like to say this is an excellent idea. After reading this thread I had a brainstorm... I''m working on developing a robust game programming interface (GPI) for my future games. I had recently read another post about how everyone seems to be developing their own wrapper/engine classes and that it might be a good idea to work together on a project like this...

To that end, I have begun to set up a site devoted to this idea. I just started working on it tonight, so its pretty lame right now, but I think I''ve managed to provide a decent description of my general plan. I figure I may as well make a post here now to try and get some feedback from the start as I set the site up... Once its up and running I think I''ll post another thread so that more people can find it, but that won''t be for a couple days at least (stupid classes and homework... oh, well)

Let me know what you think either here, my email, or the new message board on my site (I hope its working... haven''t tested yet...) Do you like the idea? Would you be interested in participating? How would you set up the site?

Thanks
-- Chip
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I think its a good idea. I am trying to do something
like that myself, but with smaller pieces to work on.
Im not getting much of a response though, but check
it out and tell me if its the same direction you wanted
to go:
http://home.earthlink.net/~uubp/gameco.htm

- Brad Pickering
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Drone: My idea is similar but I envision it more like the GameDev community (on a smaller scale) I''ve been working all afternoon and...

THE SITE IS UP!!!



It still needs a lot of work, but I''m getting there... I''m not really sure how much interest this is going to generate, but I plan on posting a general announcment in the next day or two (or three) to advertise the site''s "Grand Opening" once I get a little bit of useful stuff up there.

Hopefully it will be a learning experience for everyone involved as we discuss the pro''s and con''s of different engine/wrapper implementations for game development. There are a lot of tutorials out there about specific parts of a game engine, and even a few overarching design guides, but I''m hoping that this site will keep a record of what goes on behind the sceens so to speak when an engine or set of wrapper classes are being developed. If this information is available, it will be easy for anyone to modify the code (since they would really understand WHY everything is done how it is) or to code their own implementation.

Even if there isn''t much interest, I still plan on working on this since the engine development is something I am going to do anyway. If nobody else contributes the site will simply turn into my personal design diary which will not only be available as a reference for others who are learning, but it will help me to understand what I''m doing better since I will have to explain it on the site.

If you are interested in joining this project, please stop on by and check it out. Also, if you could drop me an email, or leave a message on my new message board there, I would really appreciate it so that I can get a feel for what the interest level is...

Thanks,
-- Chip
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>>A great idea!!! But why keep it just to programing?? Why not Artists and designers?? Programing is just part of making games.


Thorn <<

Because, programming is, as you say just part of making games, but it is the most important part.

And there are already places where game artists and wannabes go to talk shop and show their work.

www.polycount.com is my favorite. Give it a look-see.

$0.02
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