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siaspete

RPGs everywhere

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Hi everybody, I''ve been replying to posts here for a while, and one thing that I notice is that most of the projects people want to make seem to be RPGs. I can''t help but wonder why. An RPG is quite possibly one of the most complex and difficult games you can develop, requiring a lot of code, art, and general design. Making the game massively multiplayer could increase that workload by an order of magnitude (depending in your interpretation of MMORPG). Given that there are so many good RPGs for PC already, I can''t understand why people aren''t more driven to branch out to different genres. Especially considering that there are so many that are fading out. I always enjoy reading the forums here, so it would be great if this started some kind of discussion. Does anyone have any thoughts or comments on the subject? - Pete
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Most people want to program the kind of games they like themselves, and I guess most people like to play RPGs. Also, what I''ve seen it''s like most of the newbies want to make MMORPGs. I guess it''s because they think that will make them rich and famous. well, it ain''t gonna happen in one night

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In addition to what was already said, I think it''s also the age group. Quite a few of us that are on the verge of competent programming or seeking a job are around the upper high school age/college years. What did we grow up with? 2d rpgs, and doom .

Perhaps in another light, I feel that an RPG player would actually be inclined to code more than other types of game players, due to the similarities between programming and RPGs, exploration, puzzle solving, strategy, etc.

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I feel inclined to agree with iwasbiggs. Although there are undoubtedly exceptions to the rule, there is a certain type of person who is more suited to programming, or at least more likely to achieve a level of success in the field.

I think these are also the kind of people more likely to take the time that is really required to play any RPG in any real depth, and to enjoy the puzzle solving, exploration aspects of that genre.

As I say, not everyone fits this mould, but I reckon a large proportion do. Also, I think that aspiring game makers relish the storytelling opportunities that RPGs offer.


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True, it could well be all down to what people like doing. I can imagine that programmers would definitely enjoy playing RPGs.

I hadn''t played many, until recently when I bought Neverwinter Nights and Warcraft 3. I enjoy playing both, but for some reason neither are games I''d like to write.

I think it''s very easy to get caught up with "my game would be cool if..." and that sort of thing. There''s was a good article on flipCode recently by Nate Miller that deals with making a game on your own - it boosted my motivation by a huge amount. If you''ve not played Lunar Lander 3D yet, I highly recommend it.

http://www.flipcode.com/articles/article_buildinggame.shtml

Kurt Miller wrote another great article a while back about his game StrayFire.

http://www.flipcode.com/misc/sfarticle/

Thanks for the responses guys.

- Pete


Helpful links:
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way | Google can help with your question | Search MSDN for help with standard C or Windows functions

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A more important consideration is the scope of the projects as siaspete says.

I think if most (particularly those looking to prove there skills inorder to get a job) wrote out full specs, project plans etc they would realise the size and complexity of the task. Then they could decide ''In the cold light of day'' wether they want to undertake such a project.

It has to be said that you are pretty well rounded (skills Im talking about not waistline) when you come to the end!

::Glares at the pile of specs, notes and sundry articals for his RPG and slumps off muttering about people shouldnt remind him about futility ::

Regards


BaelWrath

If it is not nailed down it''s mine and if I can prise it loose,
it''s not nailed down!

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The funny thing is that RPGs are not that hard to make, or at least not any harder than other games. The core of any game is easy to develop, it''s the scripting and story that take a long time to put together. Let''s take a look at a game like Final Fantasy 7:

* When a player enters an area, the core loads the backdrop information and triggers.

* Player is allowed to walk around, which is a function of the core.

* Player hits a trigger spot. Engine checks trigger ID and runs an associated script. Script displays some text than exits. Player regains control.

* Player hits any trigger. Script is run and it determines player is trying to exit screen. Unload level and go to level specified by script.

RPG''s are really all script driven. You can take a game like NWN and use it''s scripts in your own core engine (although it''s against the user license).



Jim Adams
home.att.net/~rpgbook
Author, Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX

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I guess that is if you think NWN and its ilk are really what an rpg is all about. When I think of RPGs I think of computer based versions of AD&D that have automated NPC''s and moggies that can act sensibly.

If you create a game that is scene driven then you are really playing an interactive movie with a reward system based on character development. Yes I know this is the standard mass market RPG and does require a good degree of skill to get the immersion but its not what I think an RPG is.

Still, millions buy the standard RPG offerings so its probibly just as well Im not in the industry

I do think however that anyone learning gains a lot from producing even a simple RPG as it covers so many areas.

Regards

BaelWrath

If it is not nailed down it''s mine and if I can prise it loose,
it''s not nailed down!

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quote:

I guess that is if you think NWN and its ilk are really what an rpg is all about. When I think of RPGs I think of computer based versions of AD&D that have automated NPC''s and moggies that can act sensibly.



NWN has at its core a reasonable sets of rules (based on D&D 3rd edition), so it''s got to be the closest to AD&D. It''s just a matter that the game that comes packaged with it isn''t the greatest, but soon the mod scene will really show what it''s capable of.

The truth is, no game can match the Pen and Paper game play. The term RPG has lost its meaning, becoming a subset of traditional RPG elements, really. Character building, for instance. If you have character building elements, your game is an RPG (or at least that''s how the industry sees it). Exploration? Monster bashing? All those elements also. But, what truely makes an RPG? Many games share those elements, but can''t be considered an RPG. DOOM or Quake for instance share those elements.

Bottom line is that games such as NWN, Final Fantasy, and the others are the best (and pretty much only) we have to choose from.




Jim Adams
home.att.net/~rpgbook
Author, Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX

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quote:
Original post by siaspete
Given that there are so many good RPGs for PC already, I can''t understand why people aren''t more driven to branch out to different genres.

My answer is simple - I totally disagree with you about the "there are so many good RPGs for PC already". I''ve not seen anything that impressed me since Ultima VII back in the early 90s. It seems like people seem to think a lot of Baldur''s Gate and its derivatives, which I find to be limited in scope, awkward to control, with annoying area boundaries and loading times, hideous balance problems, and based on AD+D (a pet hate of mine). I want something better.

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