• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Kent Bengtsson

Big Team, Short Time or Small Team, Long Time

5 posts in this topic

Hi, Lets say we have a situation where u need to choose if u are going to hire 25 or 15 people. If u hire 25, u think u will get the game done in 1,5 to 2 years. If u hire 15, u have a dev. time on 3 to 3,5 years. Which would u choose and would you have a fulltime position for everyone? Regards Kent Bengtsson
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For a project of that size you need to organize all resources, maybe using a Gantt(sp?) chart that breaks down
the different pipelines for AI, Art, Research, Engine development. Buy some project management software or take a course. It''s more important that you have that organization. Then you''ll have your answer as to how many people you''ll need and the time frame.

ZoomBoy
A 2D RPG with skills, weapons, and adventure.
See my character editor, Tile editor and diary at
Check out my web-site
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bear in mind that when you add extra members to a team there is a risk that your output will increase linearly yet your time lost to communication, administration, and co-operation will rise exponentially. (A team of 4 people has 6 developer->developer ''relationships'', whereas a team of 10 has 45 such relationships.) As ZoomBoy said, organization is certainly the key. But even that introduces overhead (you have to start employing people just to manage the extra people you employed!)

Personally, I''d say hire as few people as possible to get
your game done. More does not always mean better.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With different sized groups you have different styles of management.
With 4 people there''s no such thing as a lead artist or lead programmer, with ten or more people there''s a necessity for such things because they abstract the interaction to a higher level. Yes, it means more bureaucracy but that''s a price you have to pay.

The reason you have to pay this price is because you don''t want to suffer burn out of the core members of you team. This is something that is very likely to happen over a 3 - 4 year project.
It happens on 18 month projects, so pushing how far you can push your team is a very bad idea.
As long as you can modularize the areas of the game so that there is as little need for interaction as possible larger teams make more sense.

And, besides, any game you spend 4 years making will have sections behind the times before you even release it.

Mike
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might want to really consider why you need so many people. Look at some of the successful games out today and try to find out how many people they had in each department. You may be going overboard if you were thinking all those people would be working and not including 2 layers of management.

Also, your time line seems a bunch off for the people to time system. There are a ton of business books on this explaining that people dont just get work done in a linear manner. The more you add, the more communication problems there are, the more beauracracy you HAVE to add to get them all on the same page, the less work you can actually do.

You may run faster lean and mean (to final product). You should also probably evaluate that 3 year term. Very few games take that long to make, and the ones that do are almost always RPG''s and RPGs are very hit and miss. I guess if you have the funding it doesnt matter, but its a risky proposition.

-Geoff
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Being a dyed in the wool independent, I tend to prefer small teams. The smaller the better.

My basic approach is:

1. Create the game concept. Usually this comes from myself or a partner.
2. Create the game design. Whoever the "game designer" is for this project gets most of this work. It''s a lot of writing, but worth it. This would include some research into existing technologies so you know what is readily available and what is "product development research".
3. Based on the game design, you now have a good idea of the effort required to complete the game. This is the beginning of project management. You figure out how many programmers, artists, level designers, et al, you need. You estimate how long you need each one for, and identify the "core" team members. The core team are the ones you have to have available for the entire project. Ideally, this would be the game designer, the producer/project manager, lead programmer, and lead artist (Ok, and maybe lead sound guy). These are the people you find as soon as possible, the rest you can locate later.

I''ve never officially gone finance-hunting, but if I were going to do it, I wouldn''t bother until I had my core team at least mostly assembled. All the other team members can wait until the funding arrives.

This isn''t meant to be a dissertation of the Right Way (tm), just a quick look at how I would handle it. Hope it''s helpful.


DavidRM
Samu Games
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites