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These free C++.Net compilers I hear about...

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I understand the compilers for c++.net are available for free download on msdn. However don''t we need to be subscribers to get them? Also, can I plug them into my learning edition of VC++6 so as to get around not being able to sell my work? The ide is obviously the main problem - a good one makes it so much easier. If this worked, could I then access the optimisations from the IDE interface, or have to look them up? I heard you couldn''t run C++.Net on Win9x, or is that just the ide?
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Guest Anonymous Poster
The .net framework is everything that lets you build
or run .net created/compatible software .
To answer your question : the .net framework SDK is only for
NT/2000 or higher
Your .net created software will work in 9x clients though .

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No, you don''t have to be an MSDN subscriber to download the .NET Framework SDK. The download can be found at [1]. However, the C++ compiler included lacks all the standard C++ libraries, and as such is only usable with the .NET framework.
If you want the full VC++7.0 compiler, libraries and all, you have to fork out for VS.NET. For a free IDE that works with the SDK, try [2].
The SDK is not supported on the ''lesser'' windowses such as 98, but some people have managed to get it working anyway. Take a look at [3] - I haven''t tried it myself, so don''t blame me if it doesn''t work

[1]http://msdn.microsoft.com/downloads/default.asp?URL=/code/sample.asp?url=/msdn-files/027/000/976/msdncompositedoc.xml
[2]http://www.icsharpcode.net/OpenSource/SD/default.asp
[3] http://www.omlettesoft.com/dotnet.php3


"The churches used to win their arguments against atheism, agnosticism, and other burning issues by burning the ismists, which is fine proof that there is a devil but hardly evidence that there is a God."
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I would definitely get a better compiler. You could try Dev-C++, but an even better choice would be a version of VC++.NET Professional/Academic Edition if you could get some kind of academic discount.

It IS rather surprising that after all this time no one has created a good IDE for those free compilers. There is an IDE in development for C#, but it didn''t impress me very much, and I don''t think it supports C++. Oh well.

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quote:
Original post by null_pointer
It IS rather surprising that after all this time no one has created a good IDE for those free compilers.

hmm... is it okay to mimic the MSVC-like UI without any sort of copyrights thingie? If there''s no copyrights problem, why not ''free'' IDE developer won''t make it similar?

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I skimmed the EULA, but couldn''t find anything about not making a competing IDE - this was the closest I found:

(a) "Jet" Files or MSDE. If you redistribute the "Jet Files" (as identified in the Product ) or MSDE (individually or collectively, the "MS DB Files"), you agree to comply with the following additional requirements: (i) your Licensed Product shall not substantially duplicate the capabilities of Microsoft Access or, in the reasonable opinion of Microsoft, compete with same; and (ii) unless your Licensed Product requires your customers to license Microsoft Access in order to operate, you shall not reproduce or use any of the MS DB Files for commercial distribution in conjunction with a general-purpose word processing, spreadsheet, or database management software product, or an integrated work or product suite whose components include a general-purpose word processing, spreadsheet, or database management software product except for the exclusive use of importing data to the various formats supported by Microsoft Access. Note: A product that includes limited word processing, spreadsheet, or database components along with other components which provide significant and primary value, such as an accounting product with limited spreadsheet capability, is not considered to be a "general-purpose" product.

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quote:

Original post by JonStelly
It''s actually in the license for Visual Studio that you won''t use Visual Studio to create a product that competes with Visual Studio.


What if we use DevC++ or others compilers/IDEs to create a MSVC-like IDE?

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Well, Arild didn''t seem to find it. I haven''t looked for it, I just noticed it a long time ago when I first got Visual Studio 6. I can''t remember what version it was, probably VS6 Pro. I remember there was a whole paragraph about not using Visual Studio to create your own IDE / Compiler and I want to say that someone mentioned it here.

Maybe it has been removed from VS.NET, or maybe it''s only in certain versions. Either way, if it''s not in the license, I don''t see why you couldn''t write your own IDE in whatever tool you wanted.

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It sounds like something you might get out of a Mac magazine.

I think the problem with writing an IDE is that if the IDE became competitive to Visual Studio, Microsoft could pull the free compiler off their site or charge for it. Writing a good substitute compiler would prove...difficult, at best.

Another reason is that the person providing the IDE would most likely have to distribute with the IDE a C and C++ standard libraries. (The API headers and import libraries can be obtained by downloading the Platform SDK.)

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