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What's your favorite tool to write your C++ code?

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Another newbie question, sorry... Visual C++? Notepad? What''s easier to use and to get "to the point" withough too much bells and whistles? Is VC++ a pain since it''s mainly used for apps dev? (or I may be wrong on this...)

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Most people will use the MS Visual C++ IDE cos it comes with their compiler - I am one such person. I also use EditPlus with DJGPP, and tinkered briefly with Dev C++ before giving up due to the lack of certain issues like the seeming inability to compile individual files and so on. Notepad is crap though. If you''re currently using NotePad and have $20 to spare, pick up EditPlus or TextPad instead, and if not, at least download MetaPad. (Use Google if you''ve never heard of any of these. They will come straight up if you click the I''m Feeling Lucky button.)

[ MSVC Fixes | STL | SDL | Game AI | Sockets | C++ Faq Lite | Boost | Asking Questions | Organising code files ]

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Personally, I use the Visual C++ IDE. I know that it''s not an easy utility to use, but Vi (or the Windows port of Vim) is another free option. Very difficult interface to use at first, but I know people that swear by it, and it can be a very efficient tool if you got to know it intimately.

--Buzzy
(formerly buzzy_b)

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quote:
Original post by Kylotan
... and tinkered briefly with Dev C++ before giving up due to the lack of certain issues like the seeming inability to compile individual files and so on.

I don''t think you can compile single files (without a project) from the IDE in MSVC either. Try it from the command line, that''s what I do for testing software with MSVC most of the time, and that''s how I always use GCC.

NEdit has become my favorite editor for code, although I''ve never bothered to run it in Windows (it''s probably not worth the effort, depending on the quality of the port). Other ones that I''ll occasionally use are XEmacs and GVIM (both of which have a Win32 port), although they''re very different from what you''d expect (I''m still getting used to them myself), they''re very nice editors.

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I''ve been using Visual Studio for a few years now and I think it is probably the best development environment. Though it does have shortcomings. Fortunately there is a shareware program called "Visual Assist" which sorts out a large proportion of these problems. It certainly helps you to code much, much faster.

Rory.

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When I code things using with DirectX (which is usually) I normally use the VC++ IDE because I use the compiler.

Other times, when I''m using the free Borland compiler (for console (dos-like) stuff) I''ll use Crimson Editor. It''s a nice little program that allows you to switch between open files really easily and has a directory listing on the left side so you can open files you normally work with easily also. It also comes with a syntax highlighter for C/C++. The other thing I really like about it is that it will underline pairs of braces, brackets, and parantheses which comes in real handy sometimes.

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If you dont mind buying it (and the standard version is cheap enough to start with) Visual Studio is a winner with the auto completion etc. Particularly if you are new to the system.

The next most important tool for writing code is an ample supply of coffee. And maybe biscuits. But definitely coffee.

(OK Im loosing it tonight)

Regards

BaelWrath

If it is not nailed down it''s mine and if I can prise it loose,
it''s not nailed down!

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Yep, the MS-DOS editor is the best. I use the RHIDE editor that comes with DJGPP, but since I never use any of the compilation commands/menus, it''s virtually the same as using Edit (which is what QBasic uses, btw). I always compile from the command line, either directly or with a Makefile.

Twilight Dragon
Win32 API Programmer
www.freewebz.com/j-world

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I use Microsoft''s Visual C++ 6.

Tried Borland, couldn''t stand it. Tried Notepad, couldn''t deal with no "Compile" button. Too lazy to use DOS prompt.


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quote:
Original post by Null and Void
I don''t think you can compile single files (without a project) from the IDE in MSVC either. Try it from the command line, that''s what I do for testing software with MSVC most of the time, and that''s how I always use GCC.

Well, what I meant, was that within a large project, you should be able to compile individual files whenever you want. But Dev C++ just seems to have a single ''Build'' or ''Make'' option, which is no good cos it compiles every [changed] file in your project. This is hell in situations such as when you have a 150-file project, you changed a header, and just want to compile a single CPP file to see if the header is ok.

MS VC++ can compile individual files by the way: it''ll just prompt you if you want a default project creating when you do so, and create the 3 or 4 relevant files in that directory.

[ MSVC Fixes | STL | SDL | Game AI | Sockets | C++ Faq Lite | Boost | Asking Questions | Organising code files ]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
metapad, it''s notepad the way it should have been

http://www.liquidninja.com/metapad/download.html

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quote:
Original post by trzy
MS-DOS Editor. The best text editor, ever.

I''m going to write a clone for UNIX systems (FreeBSD and/or Linux) one of these days



Definetely.
Visual C++ is good if you already know its environment (what ''workspace'' is).
When I start learning C/C++, in choosing which compiler to use I couldn''t use Visual C++ because it was too complicated for me at that time. I couldn''t compile a single .cpp file that I downloaded from the Internet as a mean of learning. It kept asking me to create a default workspace and I didn''t even know what the heck was that. I pressed ''Yes'', and it created a whole bunch of files that I didn''t know what they were. If I pressed ''No'', it didn''t compile. It requires you to make a workspace and a project in order to compile a program, even though it''s only one .cpp file. As a result, you have to learn how to use Visual C++ before you can actually learn the language itself.

So, I''d suggest you to use other compilers unless you''re comfortable with all of those workspace and project thingies. Use compilers that can load and compile one file without any complains. That should be enough for beginners.



My compiler generates one error message: "Doesn''t compile."
-Albert Tedja-

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quote:
Original post by TDragon
... using Edit (which is what QBasic uses, btw).


If I remember rightly Edit is written in QBasic and wont run without it (remembers days of deleting qbasic to get the disk space for important things).

Regards

BaelWrath

If it is not nailed down it''s mine and if I can prise it loose,
it''s not nailed down!

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