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Finishing projects

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A few years ago I decided to learn to program, and started with qbasic. I decided that the best way to do this would be to write a text-based RPG, kinda like a cross between a MUD and Zork, using the Idiot''s Guide to Qbasic as a reference. The rationale was that in the process of making the game I''d develop good design\coding habits and "learn" qbasic, so that I could move on to something else (like C\C++) Anyway, the project dragged on and on, partially because I kept forgetting about it (high school) and partially because the coding itself just took ages. At present I haven''t worked on it in months and it''s about 85% finished (mind you, most of the last few updates I thought I was also nearly finished.) I decided to stop working on it because I wanted to move on to a "real" language, C\C++, and because it was taking up too much time. From doing some background reading about the game industry, I get the impression that finishing what you start is very important. Of course, this game isn''t exactly cutting-edge but should I put in the extra month or so of coding and finish it, or just leave it and focus on c++\studying\trying fruitlessly to develop a social life? Leonard Frankel, AKA SoulSkorpion

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Finish your project, because you know that if you don''t it will niggle you at the back of your mind. Its all well and good to move on when you think you arn''t learning anything new (hell, I know I always want to) but if you do that then you''ll never get anythig finished. Apart from personal pride, I''ve also heard that companies prefer to see finished demos as it shows you have the willpower to finish something even if you arn''t being forced too.

Ballistic Programs

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Maybe I can help,

I started out like you. I learned a programming language called Dark Basic. Trust me, learning these early languages will ultimately not help you in the path to game developing. It is very important to finish your games. BUT, the exception to this is that you don't need to if YOU think you shouldn't. It's all up to you. It's like me asking the forums if I should eat breakfast or go run a mile. It's up to you. If your serious about game developing, then go ahead to c++. If you are a total newbie to it, than go to my team's website. My first two tutorials will help you out a lot. It focuses on telling you, step by step, how to program in c++. The link is at the bottom.
Read the CMo's tutorials 1 and 2. I'm workin on the third tommorrow. Reply to them if you have any questions or comments.

- Good luck in whatever you do... -

p.s. - Game companies don't look for text adventure demos.

Here's the link: Instinctz.net

- Chris [Instinctz.net: Moderator of the Tutorial Section]
"Those who are willing to lose some of their essential liberties in favour of security deserve neither and will lose both"

[edited by - Tigra7 on July 24, 2002 10:17:36 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Tigra7
Trust me, learning these early languages will ultimately not help you in the path to game developing.


I''ve seen some great things made in QBasic. Just because you dont think it''s worth it doesn''t mean that it''s not. However, if what you mean is that game companies will not hire you if all you know is QBasic I''d have to say you''re probably right.



I will not make a list of links... I will not make a list of links... I will not make a list of links...
Invader''s Realm

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quote:
Trust me, learning these early languages will ultimately not help you in the path to game developing


I think that is the absolute worst advice I''ve ever read for someone giving to a newbie...

Qbasic is an amazing language! You know why? Because you get quick and easy results while learning all of the fundamentals of programming that apply to any higher level language. In 10th grade I wrote a graphical fighting engine for a mostly text based RPG, an interactive graphical map, and a graphics editor in Qbasic... and did each of them in only a few hours piece. A friend of mine even wrote a small completely 3d engine in it. Why were he and I able to do these so quickly? Because we each had gained fluency in QBasic!

I would highly, highly recommend Basic for any absolute beginner. In all actuality, besides speed wise, you can do nearly everything in it that you can in C! Because of the speed factor and a few other things you''ll eventually want to move on, but to get started... its awesome.

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sometimes, the last 25% takes 75% of the time...

If your 25% left to do are in this category, i recommend you to not finish the game but to look how you could have structured it in a way that the 25% left don''t take so much.

If not, it won''t take so much time to finish it, so why don''t do it? (If you''re in the mood to)

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sometimes, the last 25% takes 75% of the time...

If your 25% left to do are in this category, i recommend you to not finish the game but to look how you could have structured it in a way that the 25% left don''t take so much.

If not, it won''t take so much time to finish it, so why don''t do it? (If you''re in the mood to)

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I''d say it''s important that you finish what you start, simply because turning up to an interview with a CD full of programs that are not 100% finished indicates that you do not have what it takes to finish anything. You may in your defence say that it all was taking more time than you thought it would, but what does that say about your ability to estimate development time? What also does it say about your ability to persevere?

If you find that the demo projects you are building take far too much of your time, then try something really simple like noughts-and-crosses. Have it so you can play humanVhuman, or humanVcpu or cpuVcpu. Maybe get adventourous and add a network option.

Having said that, 18 years ago I got my 1st contract job and first full-time job on the basis of an 80% completed version of the arcade hit "Pengo". Course, that was then, this is now

Roo, Pantheon Software

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