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physics alongside animations

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I usually program but I''ve been toying with Blender and learning to model. If you''re making an animation or anything really in these 3d modeling programs, how do you account for the physics? Is there any program that does it automatically? Or do you just move everything by hand?

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you just move it by hand. you could use bones and IK to help, but ussually everything is done by hand. heck before bones and fancy stuff, modellers moved everything vertex by vertex. makes you appreciate good animated models eh?
practice makes perfect.

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I just now took a look in the articles section, max seems to use ''expression'' something or another, do other programs have this?

I''m also not greatly worried about realistic physics, but let''s say you move a couple of ika''s so that, unbeknownst to you before rendering, the meshes actually go through each other, obviously not suitable unless you meant it to do that.

As there is object collision detection and response in games, what of mesh collision detection and response in animation?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
the more expensive programs like max and maya have physics incorporated into them. as for physics in game check out ico. it supposedly has a physics engine in it so everything is animated according to the engine''s laws.

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You can use Dynamics in max which does the collision detection for you . Discreet''s Reactor™ plug-in is now included in 3ds max 5 , not only for collision detection but also soft bodies and other cool stuff.

As for ''Expression'', I think most of the expensive 3d packages have it.

http://uae-arts.host.sk

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sure expensive tools have some rudimetary physics modelling for animation (heck bledner has a full fledged game creation system), but it still dont beat doing things by hand. the animators for quake3 and doom3 did all animations by hand using bones. no IK at all, no physics at all. just plain boned and skinned meshes. as for an animation where the mesh may intersect, its on you to make sure they dont. why would they intersect unless you animate it that way? you do get realtime solid meshes in a 3d view to check for that sort of thing. this means your bone setup is bad, your skinning is bad, or the actual animation is bad.

nothing makes up for understanding the physical world when you goto model it.

i think you are confusing gametime collision response vs animating a model for use in a game.

things like poser are designed for animating bipeds and come with tons of skeletal animations and some meshes for easier conntent creation. expressiosn most likly is a similar concept except the bones are all in the face.

basically boned animation with a skin mesh is the basics you need for easy enough animation creation as well as keeping things correct looking. complex animations can include muscle mass that gets changed with bone movement to simulate things better. limited scope of motion can be added as well to prevent possible erronous movement when you are creating animations.

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