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[java] good java tools?

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Hi. I downloaded sun''s SDK... It''s great, but it''s extremely annoying to manage all the stuff through DOS prompt. Can someone give me a URL to a (prefferably free) good tool I could use, that would manage workspaces, run the compiler, etc... Thanks.

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make batch files. or shell scripts if you''re on *n*x. What do you mean by "manage all the stuff" The only thing I do is
javac something.something
and
java something

ususally I have 2 dos windows open and I just alternate between them hittiing F3 to re-enter the last line.

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Don''t you use doskey? Just hit up to scroll through your stuff. Does anyone know if Win95 has tab competion like NT? Man, that was sweet. Just like unix.

Anyways, anyone try Forte for Java? Is that Java Workshop 3? I tried it but it was so slow that I just went back to my trusty text editor. Didn''t know java could be so slow. Too bad cause it''s such a good IDE...

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Sun Forte is great for laying out applications but is generally a pig when it comes to managing resources. It crawls on my Celeron 450MHz with 128MB of RAM and a 20GB 7200RPM disk.

I switched back to JBuilder Foundation 3.5 after just a few hours of playing around with it. At least JBF supports the null layout manager :p which I can''t live without despite what people say about it. JBF is still slow when compared to say Visual Studio but it''s the best IDE available for Java at the moment. It does seem to have a bug when it comes to aligning braces though. But nothing''s perfect =)


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Symantic Visual Cafe 3.0 is downloable from the net. The trial version there is a full version (with time limit).

Contains an efficent native code compiler. (Yummy!)


B.Sc. Jacob Marner
Graduate Student of Computer Science, The University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
http://fp.image.dk/fpelisjac/rolemaker/


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Forte and Netbeans are now one product owned by Sun (called Forte for Java). Sun sees it as becoming the standard IDE for Java development. We use it here at work, and it''s a very nice tool. It does use resources, though. Our systems all have 256MB of RAM and dual PIII 450MHz processors, running either Windows NT4 or Windows 2000.

If you try running it on a single processor system, Forte definitely slows down considerably. But on our systems, it runs just fine -- no complaints.

Best part about it is that the Community edition is free, yet it''s a full-featured IDE with pluggable JDK support, a built-in debugger, a nice project & file management scheme, and an excellent updating mechanism.

You can find out more about it (& download it) here:

http://www.sun.com/forte/ffj/ce/index.html


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I don''t use an IDE at the moment (I suppose I will need one once I begin working on large projects), so if all you really need to do is not have to fool with DOS then check out [URL=www.ultraedit.com]Ultra Edit[/URL]. It''s basically a beefed up notepad that''s designed for programmers and web coders. It supports syntax coloring for any language because you just feed it a word list (and there''s hundreds for literally every programming/scripting language out there) and a bunch of other stuff and you can have it run DOS commands on your files, and when I type in java functions it can figure out what my functions are and creates a function list in a small window and. I have it set up so all I have to do is push one of two buttons and it''ll either compile the code or execute it.

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With forte, do you think that upping my RAM from 64MB to 192 megs will make it run decently? (celeron 433)

Or am I basically SOL as far as speed in Forte is concerned?

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More RAM will definitely help. It''s free, so download it & give it a shot. I would also recommend using Windows NT4 or Windows 2000 as opposed to any Windows 9X variant, it''ll be much more stable. On the other hand, since Forte''s written in Java, you could run it on Linux, too... haven''t ever tried that.

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