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Cherub

gaming .NET

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I dont know - but I would say it should.

Reasons: it is better, especially in the combination with managed C++.

Things it can basically change:
- scripting langauges. Using VSA (Visual Studio foe Applications) is a GREAT way to integrate scripting into your own program. Ok, currently it is VB.NET only (C# coming soon), but it is (a) compiled code, (b) delivered with an development environment and (c) fully object oriented. I mean, what else do you want as a scripting system for your games?
- C#. A LOT of logic can be written in C#. MAYBE even whole 3d engines themselves (I am going to try this out soon). Maybe you have to resort to managed C++ for some low level stuff. But all the rest- the impact on the bottom line can be significant. Taking out memory errors in C++ will definitly cut your debugging time by 50% :-) Now, if this cuts 25% out of your budget - that IS a difference, or?

There is a reason MS is putting out managed wrappers for DirectX 9.0.

Regards


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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Im pretty sure if it was meant to change the game industry, they would have said something about it. Most of .NET is made for the rest of the programming field, a big selling point of .NET is being able to code a class structure in one language, create an instance of it in another, and use that instance in yet another, through the magic of the .NET runtime. How does this bring a huge advantage to the gaming industry? as far as scripting goes, we already have a fully object oriented language thats been suggested as a scripting language, java. theres still the fact that a big portion of the game industry uses precompiled libraries and prebuilt engines, that arent made in .NET, and I dont see why that would change anytime soon.

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Well, as for wrappers in DirectX 9.0 - let me tell you two things:

(a) they ARE for the games industry.
(b) They are EASY to use. I can not go into the details, but the smallest samples are exactly this - small. Less than a page of code to get vertices onto the screen.


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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I think .NET will gain more acceptance in the gaming industry as time goes on. The only real problem with it seems to be the hit garbage collection can impose (the only workaround I can currently see is to use object pooling and re-initialisation for short-lived objects... dirty in an OO sense, but faster). Actually, I read a thread on Google groups or something where Tim Sweeney raised and dicussed this very issue.

I have taken on a pet project to port all my graphice engine code to C# both (a) as a learning experience, and (b) to see if I can wring decent performance out of the environment... I really hope I can, as I have found working with C# and VB.NET to be a pleasure so far.

As for DirectX 9... I''m looking forward to the debugging being a crapload easier

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