Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Kylotan

Installing Linux

Recommended Posts

Hey, hope this isn''t too off-topic... I hope to install Linux (Mandrake 7.0, if it matters) in the near future with a view to doing cross-platform development, especially on my text-based MUD which will eventually be hosted on Linux, but also my graphical projects. My basic question is, what is the best way to go about this, considering that I need to be able to dual-boot into Windows too? I don''t mind reinstalling Windows, and both 95 OSR2 and 98 are available if it makes a difference. Apparently I have to disable the ''Plug and play OS installed'' part in the BIOS, which may make using Windows more awkward. I am likely to be still using Windows twice as often as Linux so it is important that Windows still runs as ''well'' (heh) as it does now. Can anyone point me to any sites with more info on dual-booting and how to do it as seamlessly as possible? Or give me some hints and advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As off topic as it is, i''m willing to help you, although i do suggest that there are better places to get Linux advice, and since you asked...



www.linuxdoc.org (Authoritative Source on Everything)

www.linuxnewbie.org

#linux or #linuxhelp on any major IRC servers.



Once you have all the installation part done, there''s no reason Windows won''t work just as (badly as) it did before. I''ve never noticed a problem with having disabled the PNP OS switch in the bios, though i''m not making any guarentees.

All in all, just partition, and then boot with lilo and it''ll all be good. 95 and 98 work just as well as each other, though you should install them first, as your friends in Redmond have so nicely added an installation feature that seeks out and disables lilo if it finds it on your MBR. Nothing that can''t be fixed with a boot disk, but still a pain in the ass.

I''m almost sure the Linux Documentation Project has exactly the HOWTO you''re looking for.

As for once you actually start developing games, i''d suggest looking at SDL and to a lesser extent, ClanLib, unless you''re going for 3D, in which case that''s a whole different can of worms...

Good luck!

-BenC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Buy win2k, install linux as an extra OS to run your MUD. Win2k is the best OS on earth presently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr(s) Anonymous (how surprising)... I am not interested in Win2K, I would like less Windows, not more, thank you

Shelrem - thanks for the links. I will check them out now. I will look into the libraries you mentioned too, although my first priority is my mud and since that uses nothing nonstandard, it should be fine.

Besides, I don''t think it''s that offtopic... anyone who wants to develop on Linux has to start somewhere I am ok with using the CLI and everything, I just have never had to install it on a machine with Windows before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mandrake 7.0 should have no problems with dual booting. ISTR that it can set this up for you.

Either way, dual booting Linux isn''t that much harder than installing the OS:

1) Find a disk partitioner that will leave a nice bit of blank, unformatted space at the end of the drive for Linux to fit in. If you get a freeware one you''ll have to mess around with defragging the drive first etc. If you get Partition Magic 5, then you save yourself a lot of hastle. Mandrake comes with DiskDrake - I''ve never used it so I don''t know how well it can do this.

2) Put in the Linux CD (and boot disk if necessary) and reboot. The installer program should have no problem locating the free space and partitioning it for Linux use.

3) Install LILO into the MBR of the disk. It recommends that you set up a dedicated 12MB /boot partition within the first 2GB of the disk, but I''ve not had any problems sticking LILO in the MBR.

4) That''s it. Mandrake boasts to be one of the easiest to install.

If you have NT or Win2K you can use the NT loader, which is nicer to use than LILO IMO. There''s a HOW-TO on it somewhere.

Also, remember to make backups of important files just in case something goes wrong, and make boot disks for BOTH operating systems in case LILO decides to destroy your MBR.

HTH

=> Arfa <=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
I''m dual-booting Windows 95 and SuSE Linux, and I''ve adjusted Autoexec.bat and Config.sys so I have a boot menu, which starts loadlin. I''ve also created a shortcut to a batch file that starts loadlin on my desktop (make sure to have it boot to DOS mode!).

In my opinion, Linux is still better than Windows. Even Win2k. It''s a programmer''s dream.

-CobraA1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you insane? Linux is a nightmare to code on. I don''t think you''ve ever actually used Win2k when you make statements like that. Win2k doesn''t crash, period. My computer has been on for approx 40 days straight now. My linux record was closer to 20 days when I wasn''t using it for anything, and probably about 5 hours when I was coding on it. So now I only use Linux as my backup OS for coding CGI. (Win98 is crap though, no argument there)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you use loadlin, can you avoid changing boot records and all that? The only reason I am a little hesitant is because I need Win9x for certain key tasks and I can''t really risk messing it up Has anybody had any bad experiences with letting their Linux distribution set up LILO etc? I will have Win9x on the first drive and split the 2nd drive into a Linux partition and a standard FAT32 partition, and basically I''m hoping Mandrake will resize my partition on drive 2 for me (not even touching my Win9x installation) and install everything safely. I looked through all the HOW-TOs etc. but they are either obscure, out-of-date, or in some cases contradictory.

Also, will Linux (Mandrake 7.0, specificially) read FAT32 disks ok? Information on this is patchy at best, and I need to know as I would like to share some of my graphics files between code on Linux and Windows, to save duplication, ease editing, etc. (I''d rather use Photoshop than GIMP... although Photopaint for Linux may be here soon, woo!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep, you can use loadlin instead of using LILO. And yes, I have managed to screw up the partition table using it, but that was my fault not the installer''s - I used FDISK /MBR to restore the MBR like the docs said, only I did it in Linux and not at the DOS prompt

So yes, loadlin is safer, if a little slower to boot up Linux.

If you have two physical drives (one for Windows, one for Linux), you won''t have any problems with LILO if you stick it in the MBR of your Linux drive and leave the Windows drive MBR be.

Almost every distribution of Linux will be able to read Win32 disks by default. The partition type is VFAT. Mandrake should work it out, but if not then it''s a 10-second hack in the fstab file to sort it out. Windows won''t be able to see your Linux partition though.

If you want to use Photoshop, you could try using VMware for Linux (www.vmware.com) or Wine (www.winehq.com) to run it under Linux. VMware will probably work the best, but requires some heavy-duty kit (at least 64MB of RAM and a PII-300 ideally).

Finally, DayTripper, how can you say that programming Linux is harder than programming Windows? The Windows API is messy to say the least, whereas Linux is as close to ANSI C as you can get. 99/100 programmers prefer it (this is made up, but everyone I know who''s tried programming both prefer Linux). If you mean it''s lacking an IDE like VC++6, check out KDevelop (www.kdevelop.org). As for stability, I couldn''t comment since I shut down my computer at night but I have a friend who had Linux running for 53 days (and actually using it all that time too) and that previous versions of Windows couldn''t stay up that long (it was hard-coded).

=> Arfa <=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Linux is too close to ANSI C, you can''t do anything on it w\o serious effort. Whereas in windows I have an enormous array of helpful classes. So the only thing I use Linux for is for compiling my CGI programs (which I happily code in windows). Anyway, my main point was about the lack of an IDE, I''ll check out the link you mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I won''t have a whole drive for Linux, just a proportion of it (I can''t dedicate 17.2gb to Linux! ) But since nothing else boots from there, I don''t think there could be any risk. How will I decide to boot from that drive though, since by default it will boot from the first drive? Would it be a case of going into the BIOS, swapping the boot order round, and then rebooting? (I''m a dual-boot newbie ) To be honest, I wouldn''t mind having to insert a boot disk or something to run Linux since I will be running Windows probably about twice as often (until I get up to speed with Linux as a desktop OS, anyway).

And as for the ANSI C thing... I much prefer that too. I like to know that my code will work no matter what platform I''m on. I wouldn''t want to use MFC or AFX etc etc anyway, as they seem horribly bloated for what they are. If you want classes, ANSI C++ has some nice ones in the STL, and there are other libraries available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, one little thing, you don''t need to disable plug and play from the bios in order to get Linux to install... ( I''ve installed it and ran it with PNP ON and there''s no problems at all... ( I''ve been running it for more than 5 years.. ) ) Second, all you need is to get Mandrake and run the install you''ll be able ( I think ) to resize partitions so that you can put linux on it..



Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
DLC Multimedia
Two Guys Soft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Cyberdrek

Ok, one little thing, you don''t need to disable plug and play from the bios in order to get Linux to install... ( I''ve installed it and ran it with PNP ON and there''s no problems at all... ( I''ve been running it for more than 5 years.. ) )


I was under the impression that, for plug and play to work under Mandrake, it has to have had the BIOS set up the software rather than wait for the OS to set it up. In fact I thought I saw that in the documentation. I''d rather not play with IRQs where I can get something else to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''ve had a variety of Linux distributions dual booting with Win98 with PnP switched on in BIOS. Things seemed to work OK. This was about 6 months ago too, and PnP support''s improved since then. One of the distributions I had installed then was Mandrake 6.0. No problems then; I can''t imagine it being any worse with release 7.

Kylotan, let me get this straight in my mind: You''ve got two HDDs, a master and a slave. The master drive is all Windows, the slave will be part Linux. If that is the case, simply installing Linux into the slave drive and sticking LILO in the MBR of that drive should be enough to get it to work.

Dual booting really is quite easy. I''ve never had any problems with it at all. On a single-drive system (irrespective of the number of partitions) just put the Windows partitions in the first half of the drive and Linux in the second part of the drive. On a multi-drive system, put Windows first again. Linux is very clever and will work wherever it''s put. If LILO doesn''t work, loadlin will let you load Linux without any problems. Failing that, every distribution will offer to create a boot disk.


Finally, DayTripper, what functions did your classes do? The chances are that most distributions come with libraries to do the task you want. If the problem is that Linux is written in C rather than C++, well I can''t help you there

=> Arfa <=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster

Are you insane? Linux is a nightmare to code on. I don''t think you''ve ever actually
used Win2k when you make statements like that. Win2k doesn''t crash, period. My
computer has been on for approx 40 days straight now. My linux record was closer to
20 days when I wasn''t using it for anything, and probably about 5 hours when I was
coding on it. So now I only use Linux as my backup OS for coding CGI. (Win98 is crap
though, no argument there)


I don''t know what package you''re using, but I''ve been using Linux for about a year now, and haven''t had it crash yet. I hear that some people have kept it on 24/7 for over a year without crashing. Be aware that some distributions are different than others.


Linux is too close to ANSI C, you can''t do anything on it w\o serious effort. Whereas in windows I have an enormous array of helpful classes. So the only thing I use Linux for is for compiling my CGI programs (which I happily code in windows). Anyway, my main point was about the lack of an IDE, I''ll check out the link you mentioned.


I''ve been taking C++ programming classes, and my code works well with Linux. Wait - you said C, not C++! You DO know that you can compile C++ also, right?

And you''re right when you say I haven''t done any Windows programming.

Anyway, I''ve never encountered any problems with programming or crashing in Linux. Sorry if I don''t view it as a "nightmare." I love it.

-CobraA1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Arfa

Kylotan, let me get this straight in my mind: You''ve got two HDDs, a master and a slave. The master drive is all Windows, the slave will be part Linux. If that is the case, simply installing Linux into the slave drive and sticking LILO in the MBR of that drive should be enough to get it to work.


That is exactly the case. But how will the BIOS decide which one to boot? It will always find the Windows drive first, no? Is there a keypress to swap that at power-on time or will I have to either change the drive boot order in the bios or use loadlin?

quote:
If LILO doesn''t work, loadlin will let you load Linux without any problems. Failing that, every distribution will offer to create a boot disk.


I am tempted to just go with the boot disk option, letting it boot into Windows normally and Linux if I have the disk in. It''s not that much of a hassle, I''d think. Or I guess having loadlin as an MSDOS-mode shortcut in Windows might be convenient too.

Thanks for your help! Should be going ahead with this as soon as I get my backups back from The-Housemate-With-The-Cd-Burner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
-- DayTripper Said --
Are you insane? Linux is a nightmare to code on. I don''t think you''ve ever actually used Win2k when you make statements like that. Win2k doesn''t crash, period. My computer has been on for approx 40 days straight now. My linux record was closer to 20 days when I wasn''t using it for anything, and probably about 5 hours when I was coding on it. So now I only use Linux as my backup OS for coding CGI. (Win98 is crap though, no argument there)...
-- End of DayTripper''s Quote --

I think you need to try it again. First of all if you''ve been running Win2K for 40 days and it didn''t crash, the system was probably off. As far as linux goes, if you know how to program, it won''t crash when you write code on it. Linux is far more supperior to WINDOWS.. That''s why all of the biggest computer sofware companies are starting to make more drivers, apps and even starting to port more games on to linux. Just take borland who''s porting Delphi & Borland C++ and merging it into the Kylix project. And as for office suites, Sun''s Star Office is way more supperior to Microsoft Office.




Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
DLC Multimedia
Two Guys Soft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Kylotan

[quote] Original post by Cyberdrek

Ok, one little thing, you don''t need to disable plug and play from the bios in order to get Linux to install... ( I''ve installed it and ran it with PNP ON and there''s no problems at all... ( I''ve been running it for more than 5 years.. ) )


I was under the impression that, for plug and play to work under Mandrake, it has to have had the BIOS set up the software rather than wait for the OS to set it up. In fact I thought I saw that in the documentation. I''d rather not play with IRQs where I can get something else to do it.

As far as it goes, I didn''t have to change anything in my BIOS. I''ve installed 2 weeks ago. Although, my distro is SuSE and it''s the one that I prefer to use. Anyhow, I''ll be at the Linux Expo in Montreal next week. I''ll ask the guys from Mandrake and try to post back if I have a chance. I''m trying to get my Linux Game Programming Company up and running and I also work for an ISP here in MTL. Anyhow, talk to y''a later.





Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
DLC Multimedia
Two Guys Soft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If anyone cares...

Following the above thread, I tried to install Mandrake last night. It was a waste of my time. Here''s why...

Firstly, the automatic partitioning simply did not work. Asking it to resize one of my 2 FAT32 partitions to make room for a Linux one made the installer bomb out with an INT 9 (Seg Fault?), and I had to restart. This happened 2 or 3 times, so I gave up on that route. So I deleted the partitions and tried another route.

I got MS fdisk to make me 2 smaller FAT32 partions and then fired up the Mandrake install to add Linux ones at the end. When I did this, it brought up an -extremely- obscure error, which I recognised as telling me that the boot sector needs to be on a cylinder < 1024. The message was certainly -not- suitable for new users and if that is who they are aiming at with this ''easy'' setup, they are failing.

So the next attempt was to remove all these partitions, add Linux in first, and get the Linux Mandrake installer to split the remaining space into FAT32 partitions. I sized Linux to what I thought would be a reasonable size (just over 1gb) and asked it to make me 2 FAT32 partitions, which appeared to work ok.

I proceeded with the install, it asked me which of a long list of packages I wished to use. Now, here was a glaring oversight - no indication of how large these packages were! I guessed that I had enough space, or at the least, it would install the most important ones first. But this really annoyed me as I was working blind.

Once everything was copied to the disk, I rebooted into Linux, hit ''startx'', and... well, I got a basic X view with 2 terminal windows, and nothing else. Mouse clicks didn''t work and there was nothing else on the screen. I managed to shut it down, but it was utterly useless - so much for KDE working as soon as you install. Maybe I didn''t have enough disk space to install it. I don''t know, nothing deigned to tell me. I would have thought KDE would have been installed earlier than some of the other things, so 1gb should have been enough, no?

So, having had enough of this, I booted back into Windows, only to find out that it didn''t recognise my 2 FAT32 partitions on the shared drive. Now, was this Windows being incompetent or the Mandrake install being incompetent? Either way, MS fdisk was not able to delete the partitions on there, nor even remove the DOS logical drives that were created. I downloaded a little partiton utility from download.com, which told me that the 2 FAT32 partitions both had invalid entries in the partition table, or something like that. So from there, I was able to remove them, and go into fdisk to add myself 2 working FAT32 partitions again.

So, as you may be able to guess, overall I am very disappointed with the Linux Mandrake installation procedure. Having installed Red Hat before on a blank machine, I had hoped that the install technology had moved on. In my experience, it hasn''t, unless you count pretty rollovers on the buttons and 3 colour schemes for the installer as progress. Finding online help for the process is difficult as many existing users installed it ''the hard way'' and have no experience of a ''simple'' GUI installer. I may try next weekend with Corel Linux instead, as although I hear the security and features are not as good, maybe the install actually works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would recommend buying a book. When I first installed a Linux distro I picked up Mastering Linux. It came with Red Hat 6.0 and covered the installation process in enough detail to get me through a couple of problems I had with it. I''ve also seen a couple of the For Dummies books (for Red Hat and SuSE) and they cover installation well also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry to hear you had a bad experience with installing Linux, but I have a
friend who successfully dual booted Win''98 and Mandrake 7.0 on his laptop
with no problems reported. Another friend - a 100% Linux novice - got
Mandrake 7 dual booting on his new system in under an hour. You are the
first person I know who''s had a problem with Mandrake 7 (or 6 for that
matter).

The <1024 boot partition error that occurred is because due to the way x86
hardware works, the Linux kernel must be in the first 1024 cylinders
(2GB) of the hard disk. There are two ways to avoid this: use a boot disk
only, or make sure that there is a 12MB /boot partition somewhere within
the first 2GB of your drive. Since you were installing to a second hard
disk, I wouldn''t have thought that you would need to do either of these
things - the install program would create the /boot partition
automatically before the first 2GB of your second drive.

As for the lack of KDE, it seems like you accidentally deleted part of the
package. Mandrake should have an option to let it decide what partitions
and packages you need. Perhaps this would have been the best option to
choose?

Another point: you have to remember that almost every Linux distribution,
including Mandrake, is a commercial product. The retail box would contain
a very thick manual containing a detailed step-by-step guide on the Linux
installation process. That''s one of the things you pay money for. The
manuals are usually included on the distribution website or on the disk.

If you want an easy install program that I can guarantee works, download
SuSE. Ask your friend with the CD burner to download SuSE the 6.3 or 6.4
eval from the SuSE ftp site (ftp.suse.com). The setup program - YaST -
is very easy to use, and it shows you how big the packages you are
installing are.


=> Arfa <=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Arfa

Sorry to hear you had a bad experience with installing Linux, but I have a friend who successfully dual booted Win'98 and Mandrake 7.0 on his laptop with no problems reported. Another friend - a 100% Linux novice - got
Mandrake 7 dual booting on his new system in under an hour. You are the first person I know who's had a problem with Mandrake 7 (or 6 for that matter).


I think the point is that it's not been tested widely enough. It may work wonderfully smoothly on most machines, but apparently not all.
quote:

The <1024 boot partition error that occurred is because due to the way x86 hardware works,



Yes, I know this. But that's still no reason to flash up an almost undecipherable error message. I knew to relocate the boot partition - a less knowledgable user would have had no idea.
quote:
Since you were installing to a second hard
disk, I wouldn't have thought that you would need to do either of these things - the install program would create the /boot partition automatically before the first 2GB of your second drive.


I was initially going for a 40% FAT32 partition, a 2nd 40% FAT32 partition, then 20% divided among Linux. Obviously it didn't like that. But when I moved all the Linux partitions to the start of the drive, it made corrupt FAT32 partitions for me, which is simply not acceptable - I can't afford to devote 17gb solely to Linux.

I had actually intended to use a boot disk, but the docs don't seem to make any mention of being able to use a boot disk -instead- of having something in the first 1024 cylinders, just as a backup in case Windows overwrites LILO.
quote:

As for the lack of KDE, it seems like you accidentally deleted part of the package. Mandrake should have an option to let it decide what partitions and packages you need. Perhaps this would have been the best option to choose?


Heh, no. It said 'what packages would you like?', I scrolled down to ensure everything was checked and hit ok. I wasn't in expert mode so there was no way I could have removed part of a package even if I'd tried. I can only assume that it ran out of disk space before it got that far.
quote:

Another point: you have to remember that almost every Linux distribution, including Mandrake, is a commercial product. The retail box would contain a very thick manual containing a detailed step-by-step guide on the Linux installation process. That's one of the things you pay money for. The
manuals are usually included on the distribution website or on the disk.


Well, I read and digested the Mandrake install guide before I installed, and basically it covered none of the problems I mentioned. It said it would be able to resize partitions for me and it couldn't, and it said it could make FAT32 partitions for me and it couldn't. I don't know what there is by way of documentation that might be better in the commercial version.

quote:
If you want an easy install program that I can guarantee works, download SuSE. Ask your friend with the CD burner to download SuSE the 6.3 or 6.4 eval from the SuSE ftp site (ftp.suse.com). The setup program - YaST - is very easy to use, and it shows you how big the packages you are installing are.


I can't really go downloading Linux distributions as my connection isn't up to it. I have Mandrake and Corel Linux on CD and chose Mandrake as I heard it was more fully featured and more secure. I am tempted to try Corel Linux to see if their partitioner is any better, but I really need those FAT32 partitions to be left intact. I also don't have the money to go buying commercial distributions or books just to set up what is essentially a free operating system. Disappointing!

Edited by - Kylotan on 4/12/00 10:05:21 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I dual boot Win98/Linux with only one harddisk (and I have only one), and it works nice, though I''m not an linux expert.

First installation, I had problem with the partitioning program came with Mandrake 7.0 (diskdrake, izit?). I used it to resize my 6.4GB drive (already partitioned as C=1GB, D=2GB, E=1GB, F=2.4GB), however in the end, corrupted FAT32 volume and some files in Windows have negative sizes!! But linux happen to be ok. This is not what I want. So....

Later, I use the simple MS FDisk that came with Windows. Repartition everything and leave 1GB for linux. I reinstall Win98 1st, then Mandrake.

I got KDE, and my mouse is working. But no sound
And can''t connect to the internet. But I can dual boot using LILO.

I''ve read some mini-HOWTO... unfortunately can''t get my sound card to work (using ALSA). It seems that the mini-HOWTO explanation is good, but lack of actual example, especially the modules and kerneld part.

Anyway, off to www.linuxnewbie.org and www.linuxdoc.org (Shelrem)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe you already did this, but starting up X using

>X
or
>startX

only gives me what you (Kylotan) got. I finally was able to get to KDE through typing

>kdm

which is the desktop manager program. I''ve almost finished getting everything up and running on my machine, except for networking. It really stinks having to go to Windows to get my mail, do some downloading, visit gamedev, etc...

BTW, not looking for any answers (just suggestions where to go look for help): I''ve downloaded the latest pcmcia package (yes I have a laptop) 3.1.8 ????, and downloaded the module source for my wireless card, but the module''s makefile didn''t like the pcmcia source tree for some reason. My friend has been able to get the exact same card working on his laptop, so I''m guessing that I have some weird phenomenon going on--where everyone else except me is able to get the wireless module to compile. What do I do?

Thanks for any help,

JoeG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by DerekSaw

First installation, I had problem with the partitioning program came with Mandrake 7.0 (diskdrake, izit?). I used it to resize my 6.4GB drive (already partitioned as C=1GB, D=2GB, E=1GB, F=2.4GB), however in the end, corrupted FAT32 volume and some files in Windows have negative sizes!! But linux happen to be ok. This is not what I want. So....


Yeah, it looks to be somewhat flaky to me.
quote:

Later, I use the simple MS FDisk that came with Windows. Repartition everything and leave 1GB for linux. I reinstall Win98 1st, then Mandrake.

I had over 1GB for Linux, but perhaps I had the wrong proportion of space in each partition. Either way, it didn''t start up with KDE, like it is supposed to, nor did it even seem to be running X properly, but then I don''t know it well enough to make a judgement. When I installed Red Hat in the past, I could at least bring up menus and things, so I assume there was no window manager set up in my Mandrake installation. Either way, the install process still needs some serious work on it if Linux is going to progress past geek level, sadly.

quote:
Anyway, off to www.linuxnewbie.org and www.linuxdoc.org (Shelrem)


To be honest, I''m finding the Linux sites very unhelpful. That''s why I''m posting here, mainly. But since I can''t seem to get any good non-destructive partioning working without paying money for it, I figure this will be both my first and my last thread in this Linux forum for a good few months yet. Thanks for the help and suggestions, guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites