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What 3d engines are you using?

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What 3d engines are peolpe using out there for thier games at the moment? I am curious since maybe there is one out there I do not know about The top 3 I have used the past couple months or looking at are 1. Truevision3d 2. OGRE 3. ODE

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i like to write my own, but before i used to use the genesis3d engine, which is about the equivilant of quake2 technology(but free). as a matter of fact, on my site, and on one of their tutorial pages, i have a tutorial minimum-application i wrote and commented, loads a level, shows it, and allows simple movement.

www.genesis3d.com

tutorial sites for genesis3d
www.genesis3d.com/~g3dh/
www.genesis3d.com/~wog/

there''s also a new version in the works called Destiny3d
it''s not free, but it is very cheap at $40 .

www.destiny3d.com



-Nicholas Anton
-www.geocities.com/nickanton7/

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I played with genesis about 1.5 years ago. But then I fond truevision3d and that was alot easier. But now I am hoping to get into .net and I am keeping a eye out for a .net 3d engine

I will have to see what destiny3d is like. I hope there is a demo version

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I am just playing around with a 3d engine in C# for a project - currently more a prototype and something to test out Dx 9 :-)

Rocks, though - I had severe doubts of writing it in C# all the way (thinking that I might have to write parts in C++ ll the time), but I am just now giving it a try, and it is progressing very nicely right now - my terrain renderer core should be finished end of the week.


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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I did not discuss it - I suggest, anonymous coward, you start reading the NDA.

I was basically stating that writing code with C# rocks, and that I had doubts about the perforamnce of the C# part of the 3d engine - this is not related to DirectX 9 besides that I have native wrappers.

Basically, my doubts were not so much the Dx9 performance, but whether C# would be fat enough - i mean, managed access is one side. There I made nice experiences - basically a lot of things you do in a 3d engine map very nicely to C#, and you dont require the garbage collector too often - not a lot of garbage created.

How does this interfere with my NDA, coward?


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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I do not have time to build a whole engine.. Well for 2d maybe but for full blown 3d forget it.

I am very interested in your C# 3d engine. I hope when dx9 is out you have something to show.

Can''t beleive everyone is so paranoid about talking about dx9. I just wonder if it makes things even easier than dx8 or s the same with just added features.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Someone a couple of months ago was saying DirectX 9 moves toward a state machine design, much like OpenGL and it has two new commands, dxbegin(); and dxend(); Since Microsoft recently bought all the intellectual propertie right to OpenGL this kinda makes sense.

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Well, that is official - there are just SOME new featuresin Dx 9 (Displacement mapping), and a managed wrapper which makes working with Dx from C# etc. native - no more using th clunky old vb interop assemblies. Thats basically the official line. The people under NDA from MS want to stay there - while not extremely rare it is a priviledge to be in the beta group. This means not only access to thedownloads, but the ability to provide real feedback and get serious advice from the people writing the code. In my case I was ina hard discussion the last days how to push vertex data most efficiently :-)

For making it easier - I frnakly can not comment on this. I start DirectX right now with C# code, no prior experience with Dx 8. For managed code all I can say is that it is much smaller than C++ - I mean, you never check HRESULTS, but get exceptions, for example. A lot less lines (and this is standarb behavior even for normal COM interop, so no NDA). Searching device capabilities is long, sure, as it has a lot of stuff. I actually gound Dx (9 and 8 as far as I looked it up - sometimes I miss some docu yet) to be pretty straightforward in concept - I mean, the whole VertexBuffer etc. mechanism is straigt forward.

Now, on a C# 3d engine - I severely had my doubts, and there is one negative (which is public, and actually not a 3d error): floating point performance in the managed world could be better - it is not highly optimised. THAT SAID, DirectX has optimised functions for vector math. But whatever you do would be better optimisable in C++ at the moment.

THAT SAID - this is not exactly a critical deal. I am currently writing a pretty basic terrain renderer, and will then (before finishing) continue to objects (I want them to mix, so I will work on this part before making the terrain nice). I had severe doubts on C# - I know C++, too, and I thought that C# might be too slow a language (not related to DirectX - a lot of work in a ed engine is not just pushing vertices). So far I was not disappointed - working with C# is easy as usual (NullPointerExceptions are so much better than random data), and C# is also better for outlining class hierarchies (I hate the C++ .h/.cpp separation). I will definitly have something to show once there is at least a public beta - I think of making the code public to some sort and maybe add a host of other libraries (networking integration, physics) to this. It is basically a feasibility study for a project of ours - when I am satisfies I will start securing funds for a full blown implementation. My goal is to push around 300.000 triangels per frame on my computer - so I have a lot of work to do.


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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I think the best stradegy for me is to just continue with dx8.1 in c++ and when the time comes to move to C# I will do that. I am hoping dx9 is not too different so that my learning now will help.

I am also waiting for .NET for CE to come out and I guess I will be able to write code for the PPC and the PC with few modifications once that happens?

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quote:
Original post by angrytofu
3. ODE
How is that a 3d engine? I thought ODE stands for Open Dynamics Engine, which can be used for physics calculations on top of pretty much any 3d engine.

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Ok you got me. Well it is 3d related and it is really cool.

To see it in action go here www.farseer.com



quote:
Original post by civguy
[quote]Original post by angrytofu
3. ODE
How is that a 3d engine? I thought ODE stands for Open Dynamics Engine, which can be used for physics calculations on top of pretty much any 3d engine.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Someone a couple of months ago was saying DirectX 9 moves toward a state machine design, much like OpenGL and it has two new commands, dxbegin(); and dxend(); Since Microsoft recently bought all the intellectual propertie right to OpenGL this kinda makes sense.


Whats this guy been smoking?

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DirectGraphics already has a state based design. i.e. SetRenderState, SetTextureStageState.also, as far as that dxbegin/dxend thing, have you not heard of BeginScene() and EndScene()???

------------------------------
BASIC programmers don''t die, they just GOSUB and don''t return.

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