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amish1234

how do they tell if a CD is burned?

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Okay, all of you know you''ve pirated software too. Sometimes when you use a burned CD, the game asks you to insert the CD on startup. How do they tell its not the original CD? Clone CD and Nero supposedly copy the CD bit for bit and don''t put in a new serial # or anything! Proceeding on a brutal rampage is the obvious choice.

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Sure we may have burned/pirated something at some stage. But that was probably before we knew how hard it was to make a piece of software.

But here is NOT the place to ask it.

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umm, he was asking how the copy protection is done, not how to crack it. theres stuff like safedisc and other schemes out there, the problem is that they often dont work in some older cd drives, and are nearly impossible to make _legal_ backups of. i believe panasonic(not sure though) boycotted this technology

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I do not condone piracy in any form, but to answer the original question, the way this is done is usually the same way its been done since back in the old Apple II/Commodore 64 days. Basically what they do is they put deliberately bad data on the medium (CD now, floppy disks before). For example, data with a bad corresponding CRC checksum. They put this data on some unused part of the disc, but when the program runs they specifically go seek the disc for this area and check to make sure the data is bad.

When your copy program makes a copy, it sees this bad data assumes its a due to a scratch on the CD or some other problem, and decides to 'fix' it for you, giving it a proper CRC checksum. Thus when the program goes to seek out the bad data its going to find it has been corrected, know you're running a copy and then exit.

There are many variations of this theme, but the vast majority use this basic principle of: put bad data on disc->seek the bad data when program run->if data isn't bad in the way we expect, don't allow the program to run.


[edited by - gmcbay on August 26, 2002 11:48:35 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
So I guess it''s best that nobody knows how this all works, otherwise someone might make a CD burner which ignores bad data and copies it exactly anyway?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
and no one will know how to make cd protection, theres always two sides, chose wisely

Master no one

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There are always a troupe of crackers ready to rip the lastest unreleased releases... and to crack the top-secret beta versions... how do they do that??

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Guest Anonymous Poster
theres cd burners that copy the cd with the protection too, but theyre very expensive.

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I backup my CD''s all the time.

It is perfectly legal, and allowed by law. Even if the EULA''s explicitly state that this is not allowed, it is still allowed, because it is a provision in law that cannot be taken away by a private contract (in fact, that provision automatically invalidates the EULA as a valid contract).


You can download a crack, which basically causes the program to skip over the copy protection verification. Allowing us to excersize our legally given rights.

copy protection does nothing but annoy legitimate users; pirates aren''t annoyed by this shit.

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quote:
Original post by Mithrandir
You can download a crack, which basically causes the program to skip over the copy protection verification. Allowing us to excersize our legally given rights.


While fair-use copying is legal, the above is not because of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. We can have a legal backup, but we cannot circumvent any protection mechanisms to obtain or use one.


[edited by - wayfarerx on August 27, 2002 5:32:39 PM]

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