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STLport vs. VC++7 STL?

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I''ve always been under the impression that the microsoft implementation of the STL was pretty poor (as in nonstandard) due to my experiences with VC6 and so I have used STLport for a long time. However, I have heard it said recently that the new version in VC7 is alot better than before - even better than STLport. Can anyone shed any light on whose implementation is better? thanks jx

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I don''t know which implementation is better, if you mean efficiencywise or which is more conformant to the standard. However, if you are interested in writing portable code I''d recommend STLport as it is the default STL implementation coming with gcc (for Linux), SGI:s c++ compiler and Borland C++ Builder. Also, as you probably know, it is available for a very wide variety of compilers.

STLport is very conformant to the standard so I guess MS would have to make a truly excellent STL implementation to do better. Also I kinda like having <slist> around, because most of the times (at least in my usage) <list> is an overkill.

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Just to be picky - MS doesn''t write the STL that ships with VC++. It is licensed from Dinkumware.


"PL/I and Ada started out with all the bloat, were very daunting languages, and got bad reputations (deservedly). C++ has shown that if you slowly bloat up a language over a period of years, people don''t seem to mind as much."

James Hague

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IMO, the Dinkumware hashed containers are better designed than the STLPort ones. The rest seem much of a muchness; Dinkumware''s locales seem to work a little better, I think. STLPort''s main virtue, AFAIK, is its checked iterators.

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