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Hi I''m programming for some time now and I''ve learned C++ and Opengl and currently i''m learning Directx.. Only the way I learned C++ was by reading Nehe''s tutorials on opengl and learning C++ on the fly. I don''t think this is a great way and I''m still noticing that things like OO, inheritance and the more advanced stuff are a litle difficult for me. So I went to the bookstore here in town and they had a book on C++ but most of the topics in that were really easie and I understood them very well.. It was a quit expensive book and I don''t want to wast my money on a book where i''m only going to read a few chapters.. So how should I proceed? Just programming and programming and trying to learn everything from experience or do you have a suggestion for a good book that could help me? Thnx for the help

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If you really wanna give your brain a good exercise, I''d suggest learning something altogether different (and even slightly useless!). If mastering object orientation is important to you, learning a language that does it all out might be a good idea--I would suggest Smalltalk, the granddaddy of all OO languages. By doing so, you''ll certainly understand these concepts well and be able to apply them quite readily to C++. http://www.smalltalk.org/, or, for something *really* cool, http://www.squeak.org/ - a desktop environment entirely written and based in Smalltalk!

Of course, you should be able to get by just fine without doing anything moderately massochistic like this. =) Just writing code is an excellent idea if learning complete new langauges ain''t yer bag.

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Even though i think that learning C++ on the fly is an exceptional way to learn (just my opinion) i still think that you need to get some kind of a book for reference, regardless on how many chapters you do or do not read. Because later on you may forget something and you will need a referece to help you remember; b/c its just not practical/possible to ''memorize'' everything in C++. I like The Complete C++ Reference by Shildt as a reference book.

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I''m currently working on a game(the penguin game, maybe some of you read about it in another part of the forum ) but I notice that I don''t now some things..

Nehe''s tutorials cover a lot of C++ and by reading other GL and DX tut''s I now my C++ basics quit well

The book C++ the complete reference, I saw some reviews of it but isn''t that book a little old today? It was written 4 years ago.. Is that book still up to date?

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Yes, I would imagine it is still up to date. Since the book is a book that is based on editions; i would imagine that if it was in fact out of date then Edition Four would be out (and it may be, i don''t know for sure). What i''m saying is, the times have changed but i do not believe the basics of C++ has undergone any drastic changes in the last four years (from the publication date of The Complete Reference: C++, by Shildt).


Those aren''t bugs...they''re added features :-|

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effective c++ also gets my vote

also if you look at some of the libraries available and learn how to use them from their documentation you will also learn a lot about c++

specifically boost (boost.org) and the standard template library included with your c++ distribution (whatever flavour it may be). it is well documented on the sgi website. google to it or follow the links in some of the other posters signatures (i really should sort out my own)

it''s hard work though! i''ve been programming for about 6 years and am still learning every day. which is brilliant!

also bjarne stroustrups c++ programming language is fantastic but maybe too in at the deep end (but i''ll encourage you to take the plunge). it''s written in 1997 and isn''t out of date. it''s standard, the base line, de riguer, the gospel, the horses mouth, you get the idea.

peace

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quote:
Original post by NicolasX
I like The Complete C++ Reference by Shildt as a reference book.

Schildt has been largely discredited as an authority on either C or C++ by the respective communities. Google for "Bullschildt". The books that DerekSaw recommended, OTOH, are written by well-respected C++ authorities.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Object Orientation (OO) is more of a design paradigm than a language or API. I know people who still write C like programs in C++, with every function and variable globally defined.

Focus will be your key to learning. Try not to get distracted with OO while learning an API and vice versa. Thanks to MFC, I learned OO right out of the box when I started writing C++ windows programs. Before that I would write QBASIC and assembler x86 programs which were notoriously not OO.

Remember focus. When I design, I''m learning OO techniques and patterns to help my structure, but when I code, I''m more concerned with interacting with the API correctly that OO.

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