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dog135

Wolf

31 posts in this topic

dog135 you got some money in a game or a poster company in your wolves and dogs! I''m a fairly good artist but i have nothing to show really. Keep drawing those dogs, who knows you could be the next vincent vangoue (exept for the ear thing)

"blow up a lawnmower plant, save a lawn gnome!"
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Thanks, Ninja boy!! I appreciate that!

Well, as of the 24th, I've been drawing cartoon characters for one year. To celebrate, I drew an aniversary pic. I've included, in the background, 2 drawings from every month for the last year.
(the one in the upper left is my very first attempt)



E:cb woof!

Edited by - dog135 on 4/26/00 2:42:54 PM
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Wolf, do you have a web page? If you don''t you should get one. I have a question too, do you have 1 dog you draw that has a name? or do you just draw dogs for fun?

"blow up a lawnmower plant, save a lawn gnome!"
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Yeah, I have a web page, just look at my profile. It''s:
http://www.verica.com/usr/dog

I don''t have many names for characters. Havn''t been drawing long enough to name many of them yet. My main character for my game is called Sara, her mentor (a fox) is called Trixie, and I have a computer mouse called "Maxie", I''m just Dog.

They''re all on my site.

E:cb woof!
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Your work would benefit greatly from a class in comparative anatomy. While I am not particularly fond of the digitigrade canid-humanoid cross, I know people who are, who have applied anatomical concepts to imaginary constructs and come up with very believable beings.

I also reccommend scientific illustration as a good course to improve basic rendering techniques.

$0.02
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Probably would help. But I'm not going to take a class for something that's just a hobby. When I do my game, I'll spend more time on getting proportions correct, etc. I'm just drawing right now because I have an hour to waste on the ferry each morning and afternoon.

Another reason I don't plan on getting heavy into graphics is because I'm colorblind. If it weren't for the fact that I memorized RGB values for most colors, I'd never have any colorized art. At least nothing you'd be able to withstand looking at. (Some people can't stand looking at my computer screen because of the color scheme I have set up.)

Oh, and FYI: I only recently started using constructs. Anything older then Feb of this year was drawn strait from head down without any preliminary lines. (Other then outlines) The girl in my aniversary drawing with the Pokeymon ball was drawn all in pen. If you look at the larger version of this, you can see just how I use to draw.

E:cb woof!

Edited by - dog135 on 4/27/00 3:04:46 PM
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