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PlazmaZ

I am new here can anyone help me???

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I am really interested in learning how to make computer games and learn how to program but i don''t know anything at all. I am really good at learning and computers. I read the for beginners section but i just wanted to ask everyone here what they thought was the best way to start. I am only 16 and i don''t have that much money but i am really interested in learning!!! Please post here if you have any suggestions on how i should start!!

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Get yourself a compiler - Dev-C++ is a good bet and it's free. Get yourself a debugger to go with it - the Insight debugger that goes with Dev-C++ is a good bet and it's free. Get yourself a book on learning C++ - ~$40 - There are a lot of web tuts, but you'll be better off in the long run getting yourself a book. Start teaching yourself the language - learn how to program first. Then move along from there into programming games.

// Edit: as for which book to get - you'll get a different answer everytime you ask the question. Check the comp.lang.c++ faq. Check for recommendations at bloodshed.net too. If you decide to use Dev-C++ it makes sense to teach yourself from a book that meshes well with that compiler system. The compiler that Dev-C++ uses is gcc which is very standards compliant - so it should work well with any good "intro to C++" book - but you'll have an easier go with it if the book you choose doesn't make repeated reference to particular features of one compiler that aren't available in others.

[edited by - lessbread on August 30, 2002 1:50:31 AM]

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First off, welcome!

Secondly, don''t say ONLY 16. Many of our members are 14 and under. Age isn''t a factor; all that matters is when you start and how dedicated you are. Of course, I''m not saying it''s too late for you, but don''t think you''re getting an early start

Okay, so you have never programmed. Well, if you want to be a game programmer, that''ll have to change. The industry standard at the moment is C++. How easy it is to learn depends on how much time you put into it, how good your resources are, and how good you are at problem-solving.

Some people will advise you to not learn C++ as your first language. I personally think I would have been better off if I HAD learned it first, but this too depends on how quickly you slip into the coder mindset.

The best advice for learning any programming language is to get a good book. There are many available. I recommend reading reviews on Amazon.com to get a feel for what''s good. A solid book is one of the best investments you can make.

Now, onto the games part. Something you need to understand: games are completely comprised of data, data manipulation, and data interaction. You need to be able to break down complex systems into their component objects and forces pretty well before you get into any heavy-duty game programming.

Until you know a language well, though, don''t focus too much on games. You can skew your learning towards games, and you can make small games in text mode, but DON''T get in over your head. Anyone can do this if they take the time to learn how they need to do it, and starting on a game too early in your coding career will only serve to discourage and repel you. Take it easy.

Finally, stick with it. You seem to have the desire to learn and progress, and I wish you the best of luck. If you have any questions, just drop a line here or email me.

Peace,
ZE.

//email me.//zealouselixir software.//msdn.//n00biez.//
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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well, get yourself a free compiler. Like Dev-C++ (bloodshed.net) or MinGW (mingw.org) (Dev-C++ incorporates MinGW). These are excellent tools!

Google for some beginners tutorials in either C or C++ (or both) and start writing some simple console based apps (hello world, text output etc.) to get a jist of how programming works. Continue learning, experimenting, trying and failing and succeeding.

Read through the beginner''s section here.

Look at other people''s sources (sourceforge.net) to learn.

This won''t be done in a day, though, so you''ll need some patience.

Just get started!

Hope it helps.

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If you haven't got any money then maybe linux would be useful.

It's free and comes with great tools for programming. The KDevelop software is what I use for work when I don't have to be on my MS laptop. It's every bit as useful as the stuff you can buy for a few hundred pounds.

If you don't have good web access it usually comes on magazine disks in different 'flavours'.

Just an idea. Changing your operating system might not be the best thing to do when you're trying to learn something else (ie programming) as it's easy to spend all your time learning linux. It's an option though.

Peace, welcome, enjoy, the people are nice here

Pete

edited to try and get rip of that grumpy icon! don't know where that came from. slip of my touchpad i guess.

[edited by - petewood on August 30, 2002 7:59:18 AM]

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First of all i would like to say that i am very impressed with all the responses i got, most of the time people just blow me off because i am a newbie! Thanx for everyones input it has helped a lot. I still have a few questions though. What Linux should i get?? There are so many and i am confused about what i should get! Also what is the best book that you have read on programming?? I want everyone''s personal opinion!

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Hi and Welcome aboard

Personally, if you''re coming from a Windows background, I''d just get BloodShed Dev-C++. It''s totally free, and it''s a great compiler and IDE (Integrated Development Environment). Don''t bother with Linux because, like was posted earlier, you''re gonna spent a whole lotta time just figuring out linux.

For learning C++ right off the bat, I''d personally recommend the Standard C++ Bible, published by IDG books, and written by Al Stevens and Clayton Walnum. Then, once you''ve wrapped your wits around the material in that book, you should really get your hands on a copy of The C++ Programming Language by Bjarne Stroustrup (the creator of C++). It''s a bit beefier and a little more difficult than the Bible, but it''s the definitive text on C++ (every C++ programmer worth his salt should have a copy of that book).

Anyway, the best advice I can give is to stick with it, and try to progress gradiently. Don''t get in over your head. Get the small programs working first, and then gradually move on to bigger things As long as you''re actually making working programs, you''ll want to make more.

And most importantly, just have fun!

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