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NTFS

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Does anyone use NTFS for windows 2k? Are there limitations on it? Could you still develop and play games? Currently have 2 harddrives both formatted as FAT32. One of the harddrive (c is where I store operation system (win2k) and installed applications. The other harddrive is where all my important data lies. If I reformat the C: drive to NTFS and leaving the other drive alone, will I be able to use it normally? [edited by - vbisme on August 31, 2002 1:24:04 PM]

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Yes, I use it.
No there are no limitations. Nothing you would be doing in a game should require NTFS. At least nothing I can think of. Some options for manipulating files with the Win32 API are limited to NT based operating systems, but thats why the MSDN library exists. Just don''t use those options and your game should be fine.

-rembrant

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The only reason *not* to use NTFS is if you are dual booting with Win9x, or dual booting with Linux, and you need write access to your Windows partition. NTFS is superior to FAT32 in every way.

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quote:
Original post by Martee
The only reason *not* to use NTFS is if you are dual booting with Win9x, or dual booting with Linux, and you need write access to your Windows partition. NTFS is superior to FAT32 in every way.



Yep. And even then, just bung 2 hard drives in one FAT, one NTFS - then get the NTFS access utils from www.sysinternals.com so you can get to the NTFS drive from 9x

[that''s what I do on my home machine]

--
Simon O''Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com

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Guest Anonymous Poster
There is an extremly good reason not to use NTFS. Unless you use a program like norton''s ghost to create backups of your system from time to time, it is extremly likely that should a problem occur you can loose all of your data. Why? Simply because you can''t make a NTFS Boot disk.

Take for instance what recently happened to me. I recently had to upgrade my motherboard. This new motherboard had a different drive controller than my previous motherboard so when win2k decided to boot up it would try to detect the drives and lock. So I tried the next logical step which was to boot up in "repair" mode. This mode is a wonderful mode however it only allows you to access one drive at a time, and will not delete the winnt directory. Needless to say that this lead to me having to reformat my hard drive all because there was no real way to retrieve or backup the data stored on the NTFS partition. And because a normal fat32 boot disk can''t read the NTFS data either. So unless you do frequent backups I''d avoid NTFS.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you had used the console mode when using the installation disk you could have accessed the files normally. You could then have copied the files you need to another location.

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Stick the hard drive in another computer. Or don't store important data on the system partition. Or boot from another install of NT on the same computer. Or boot from a Linux install on the same computer. Heck, you could probably boot from one of those 'Live Evaluation' Linux CDs, mount the NTFS partition, and copy all of the data over a network to a safe location.

Edit: Oh, and you can get NTFS boot disks. There's even a free read-only NTFS driver for DOS at SysInternals.

[edited by - Martee on August 30, 2002 2:34:41 PM]

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I currently have 2 harddrives both formatted as FAT32. One of the harddrive (c is where I store operation system (win2k) and installed applications. The other harddrive is where all my important data lies. If I reformat the C: drive to NTFS and leaving the other drive alone, will I be able to use it normally?

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I don''t remember all the details, but there are lots of reasons to pick NTFS over FAT32, like file level security and what not. This is something you can look up on Google. Always pick NTFS over FAT32 unless you have some very very good reasons.

Basically, FAT32 was designed for stand alone DOS machines, has almost zero security, and has lots of other problems from its DOS legacy. You''d be crazy to use FAT32 for enterprise or commercial use.

NTFS was designed from the ground up to be a file system to be used in commercial and enterprise settings. They basically took all the nice features of the UNIX file system and mushed it onto the old FAT32 system.

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Dunno if it''s marketing cr*p but isn''t NTFS almost unbreakable? MS said it can autoregenerate in case of errors.

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