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Best compiler/IDE?

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I want to buy a a new compiler/IDE but i''m not shure which one to choose. I was thinking of buying VC++ 6.0 with student licens, but first I need to know a few things. What happends when I''m not a student anymore? Can''t I use VC++ anymore and sell my programs? Is there any newer IDE like VC++ 7.0? What is VC++.net? Thanks for your help!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
if you buy Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus (not a bad book but not perfect) you get a free copy of MS Visual C++.
cheap way to get a look at the IDE.

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quote:
Original post by tordyvel
I want to buy a a new compiler/IDE but i''m not shure which one to choose. I was thinking of buying VC++ 6.0 with student licens, but first I need to know a few things.


Buy the Academic version of Visual Studio.NET.
quote:

What happends when I''m not a student anymore? Can''t I use VC++ anymore and sell my programs?


You can continue to use VS.NET after you leave school, and sell your programs.
quote:

Is there any newer IDE like VC++ 7.0?
What is VC++.net?


VC++7.0 == VC++.NET


"When you know the LORD you have no need for masturbation!"

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I''m not sure if you can buy an academic version. When I tried to, m$ told me that that version is only for academical institutions, such as schools...

I''ve ordered the Standard edition of VC++.NET. It is cheap, but it misses program optimization, which is not very appropriate for releasing commercial programs... or maybe it is if you are creating small games.

Damjan "Rhuantavan" Mozetic

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I think you owe it to yourself to try Dev-C++ (link in signature). Not only is it completely free, it is comparable to VC++ in looks and features. I know that there are some people who can''t stand Dev-C++, because they say it is not as good, or it is too buggy, etc, but before you spend money for Visual C++, you should at least give the free download a shot. You just might like it (I did!).

|.dev-c++.|.the gimp.|.seti@home.|.try2hack.|.torn.|

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quote:
Original post by Rhuantavan
I''m not sure if you can buy an academic version. When I tried to, m$ told me that that version is only for academical institutions, such as schools...


This is quite simply not true. I''m not discussing this with you - I am telling you.
quote:

m$


Grow up.

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Perosonally, if I owned a company, and people put $''s in the name when they typed it, I wouldn''t be that upset (quite the opposite really).

When I bought the acedemic version of Visual C++ 5, I had to proved proof that I was a student and actively enrolled.

[moved to general]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
No Linux users huh. I''m a big fan of kdevelop. I took a graphics class at school and this was a life saver. Check it out at www.kdevelop.org. I think it is even be possible to run in cygwin under windows.

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quote:
Original post by tordyvel
What happends when I''m not a student anymore? Can''t I use VC++ anymore and sell my programs?



Excuse my ignorance, but since when have any academic versions of any software allowed for commercial use (this includes selling programs you write in academic versions of languages)? It''s always been my understanding that the academic pricing was to cater to students without sufficent funds to purchase the license for commercial development, but whom yern to learn the software for preparation in a job that does have a commercial license. In other words don''t you have to buy a license to develop commercial software applications once you''re no longer a student, that is if you want to sell your programs.

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*Shoulders through Arild Fines'' and civguy''s catfight*

I agree you should try Dev-C++. I wouldn''t call it nearly as full-featured as VC++ but it''s pretty good.

You may also want to look into Borland C++ Builder. I like it a lot. You can get a trial at http://www.borland.com

However, VC++ 6 or .net should be just fine for your purposes.

-Auron

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quote:
Original post by Xorcist
Excuse my ignorance, but since when have any academic versions of any software allowed for commercial use (this includes selling programs you write in academic versions of languages)?


There aren''t any redistribution limitations in the VS.NET Academic license.

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If I recall correctly that was the case when I was in college - you could get MS software for academic prices without any restrictions on its use - I guess the idea is that if you''re in college you probably won''t have much time to develop commercial programs, and it''ll be obsolete by the time you leave

Seriously though, I guess MS doesn''t mind losing some money now and get someone who is likely to get a licence for their programs on the next upgrade cycle.

You know, I never wanted to be a programmer...

Alexandre Moura

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quote:
Original post by alexmoura
Seriously though, I guess MS doesn''t mind losing some money now and get someone who is likely to get a licence for their programs on the next upgrade cycle.



It''s not like they are losing money. in fact they are receiving money from people they would not have received money from if they had to pay the full price.

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quote:
Original post by tordyvel
I want to buy a a new compiler/IDE but i''m not shure which one to choose. I was thinking of buying VC++ 6.0 with student licens, but first I need to know a few things.
What happends when I''m not a student anymore? Can''t I use VC++ anymore and sell my programs?
Is there any newer IDE like VC++ 7.0?
What is VC++.net?

Thanks for your help!


With the student version of VC++( all the versions I''ve seen, at least ), you can''t sell your executables. As for what is VC++.net, that''s VC++ 7.0


"DaHjajmajQa''jajHeghmeH!"

Cyberdrek
danielc@iquebec.com
Founder
Laval Linux

/(bb|[^b]{2})/ that is the Question -- ThinkGeek.com
Hash Bang Slash bin Slash Bash -- #!/bin/bash

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quote:
Original post by Cyberdrek
With the student version of VC++( all the versions I''ve seen, at least ), you can''t sell your executables.


I have already stated that this is not so, and I have provided more than sufficient evidence to back that up. Why do you insist on prolonging this useless discussion?




"When you know the LORD you have no need for masturbation!"

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I am interested in getting hold of the Studnet version of Visual Studio.NET and everything that I have read on the Micro$oft website (the UK one indicates two things:
1: You can only get an Academic version of it, which is for schools etc.
2: The only Student licence available is for M$ office.

I did find Visual Studio 6 as a student edition once, but not .NET and I haven''t found that page again. As far as I know the only student license M$ product available in the UK is Microsoft Office, and I don''t want that (I use Lotus SmartSuite Millenium, which comes with voice recognition in the form of IBM ViaVoice). If I am wrong then please provide a working link to the relevant page which does not require me to be a member of that site.

--Thomas McCorkell

Just what is Karma? Is it a way to rate people? A way of assigning privilege levels? Or is karma just an anti-spam system?

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