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Should we keep Visual Studio 6 if we have .NET

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I just got .NET a while ago, and I was wondering if I should ditch VS 6 altogether, or if that is even necessary. I like both of them, and one of my books teaches specifically using Visual Studio 6 (Beginning Visual C++ 6 by Ivor Horton). Things move along so fast, it is difficult to keep up, but I really don''t want to have any ''old'' software that may become obsolete.

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Keep it, but keep in mind that vc.net is newer. It should (if used properly) be more productive to spend time with vc.net as it has x years ahead of it, whilst vc6 is nearing the end of it''s x years. In saying that, vc6 is far from useless, and certainly useful if you are more familiar with it for some tasks. Quite a few things in the interface of the interface for vc.net change from vc 6 but through my experience learning how to do things in vc6 encourages you to explore new things in net.

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vlov: Uh, no. VC.NET is still C++. There IS a VC# though...it''s all part of VisualStudio.NET

Shadow: If you have VS.NET (or even just VC.NET), what would be the need for having VC6 installed at the same time? They do the same thing. About the book, I don''t know, but I imagine you could use it with .NET. Certainly most of the material will be applicable.

Later,
ZE.

//email me.//zealouselixir software.//msdn.//n00biez.//
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dont ditch it.

my company did that, and boy did we suffer.. some damn mfc message map code got wasted because of compatibility ..

keep your vc6. unless someone wants to buy it for a high price..

Its my duty, to please that booty ! - John Shaft

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i''ve heard that you can set up VC7 up to be exactly like 6..
not to mention the compiler is x% faster...
only thing that has held me back is that whole tomato hadn''t
released visual assist for vc7 as of my last check.

-eldee
;another space monkey;
[ Forced Evolution Studios ]


::evolve::

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quote:
Original post by eldee
only thing that has held me back is that whole tomato hadn''t
released visual assist for vc7 as of my last check.

They have now.


"Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?"
Epicurus

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You can have Visual Studio 6 and Visual Studio .NET installed at the same time. It''s handy to keep VS6 around if you''re still using MFC 4.x or lower for anything (VS.NET prefers MFC 7, I believe), or if you''re going to be developing using versions of DirectX prior to DirectX 7. (I''ve had issues builing a DX6 app with VS.NET.)

If you''re going to be developing code that will be shared online, I recommend using VS6 for a little while longer, and just maintain a seperate project file for VS.NET. VS6 is still in wide use, and only having a .sln/.vcproj file might turn some potential code reviewers off.

However, if you''re going to be developing code just for yourself and people that you know are using VS.NET, use VS.NET.

RomSteady - Test Locally, Test Globally, Test Early, Test Often

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not to start a flame war but, i can''t believe so many ppl are being sucked into the vs.net hype... i''m not a microsoft hater, but it seems to me many programmers are switching to it because it''s the ''new thing'' rather than because they actually ''need'' it. when i went to the vs.net launch convention to see what all the hype was about, i saw quickly it was just that... a bunch of hype and a new toy for vb/c# programmers. sure, there are a few ''neat'' features, but imho, there is nothing wrong with the vc6 compiler and if you are comfortable with it, why stop using it? for some developers, the new vs package isn''t a bad option... take vb.net programmers... the language and syntax are more like c/c++ making it more robust and OO.

sorry, this was just my round about (opinionative) way of saying stick w/ vc++6.

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In general, I believe newer versions of software usually always has new features, more efficient algorithms, and many bug fixes. In other words, you should always update to the latest software version just as you would a new driver. Again, I am talking general cases. There are exceptions. For example, I found Winamp 3.0 Final to be extremely slow. Winamp 3.0 sucks! Winamp 2.x owns!

Okay. I highly recommend it Visual Studio .NET over Visual Studio 6.0. Microsoft did an exceptional job of added an whole new interface. I program C++ and the new C++ compiler is an elite C++ compiler.

Kuphryn

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quote:

In general, I believe newer versions of software usually always has new
features, more efficient algorithms, and many bug fixes. In other words, you
should always update to the latest software version just as you would a new
driver.



i call them service packs (and so does MS), but hey, what''s a few thousand for a *new* set of tools? especially since these will surely be bug free! :D

just kidding, i do agree with you, to some extents, but i''ve always been the type that likes to reuse rather than reinvent the wheel every year or so, especially if it saves me a few paychecks to spend on lifes more important things... video games!

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I use VS.NET academic edition ... as mentioned before, 4 years are a long time in the software cycle ... but it''s quite annoying that the new Visual Studio requires almost 1.5 GB of HD-Space (but okay, I installed almost everything, and HD-Space is cheap) ... but I think VS6.0 is a good start ...

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quote:
Original post by Arild Fines
VC++ 6.0 is four years old now. In software, thats a long time.


true, but what is the most important thing it does?
"convert" c++ code to a win32 *.exe.
vc6 does this well, and the ide is nice enough (at least for me)


hundreds of dollars for some new ide features, and maybe
slightly shorter compile time?
nope for me.





It is now for sure you can throw away your computer

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