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OS woes - which one to use? Linux vs Windows

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I guess I''m not really a beginner, but I decided that this was the most appropriate forum to ask this on, and besides, the people in here are always so helpful Im currently using windows 98 (on possibly the oldest computer ever!) I plan on getting a new computer soon, and Ive been looking at windows XP professional, and Im not sure if i like it. Ive only got to use it for maybe an hour or so, but It reminds me of some sort of Fisher Price operating system. It really likes to hold your hand for everything you do ( you cant even search for a file without some gay little paper-clip or dog or something trying to help you along ). Not exactly my idea of ''professional''. I was wondering what other people use for operating systems? Im guessing most people either use Windows or Linux. Which brings me to my next question. How do I decide (quickly) if Linux is for me? Ive only ever used it for a short while at school, and even then, i only used the simple point-click interface (I dont know all the fancy little commands). Could someone point me to a good site to help me decide if i want to use linux? If i did go with linux, it would likely be red hat. Is there anything that anyone can think of that linux is exceptionally good or bad at? for example: development, games, crashing, steep learning curve.. anything you can think of. Thanks a bunch! ----- It''''s not my fault I''''m the biggest and the strongest; I don''''t even exercise!

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I''d say stick with Windows and get XP. I didnt like it at first but now its simply the best. You can turn off the ''Toy'' look you were talking about and it''s the classic windows again.

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When I used it, I wasnt able to turn off the ''toy'' look because it was a school computer and I wasnt allowed to change any settings. But I have a question: When you turn off the toy look, does it also turn off the lame little helpers all over the place like I mentioned?


Also, I think I might try to get Linux and Windows running on the same computer. Is that possible if i have a big enough hard drive? The reason is because I want to try linux for a little while, but I also dont want to lose my windows incase I dont know how to do something in Linux. Im still in school, so I dont want to end up not being able to finish an assignment because I dont know how to use my computer

Finally, I heard that Linux is free because its open source. Where can i get the latest version of red-hat?

thanks again!

-----
It''''s not my fault I''''m the biggest and the strongest; I don''''t even exercise!

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I started using Linux a year ago and gradually just learned the commands. Not sure how, but I did. I still use GUI shells but I rely more on commands now. There should be an article that I wrote about Linux Development on the site soon (it also covers some general linux stuff.) But Dave is a busy fella.

If you're not prepared to spend a lot of time getting mad, then just get Windows, it'll be easier.

[EDIT] (you just posted)

I have a 20gig HD and I split it 13gigs for Windows, 5 for Linux, 1 for the Linux swap. (the other gig is ... i dunno where ). Make sure you install Windows, then Linux so you can have the boot loader up.

The Linux Kernel is open source. The Latest Version of Red Hat is located at the RedHat website...not sure of the URL.

[edited by - SuperRoy on September 8, 2002 1:15:36 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
if its only the little helpers and the fisher price look that bothers u about windows xp, u should stick with windows xp and just disable all that stuff. i know u can because i have.

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You can get RedHat at www.redhat.com but the server is pretty slow. You might also try Mandrake which is more foucsed on beginners than other distros I know of. Faster server also. www.linux-mandrake.com I think.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Linux has a steep learning curve, and protected memory (keeps it from crashing).

Linux is also free, and so is almost everything for it. linux is the hacker''s choice. Hackers who are prone to pirating (second only to AOL 15 year olds). So if you plan to develope for linux, plan to do it for free.

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quote:
Original post by AndreTheGiant
Finally, I heard that Linux is free because its open source. Where can i get the latest version of red-hat?

It''s not free because it''s open source, but it is both free and open source (free as in speech).

If you don''t want to run into the learning curve (which wasn''t too bad for me, but maybe that''s because I wanted to learn), just pick an ''easy'' distro. Red Hat, Mandrake, SuSE, Lycoris, and others are considered ''easy''. The only reason Windows is ''easy'' is because people have already overcome its learning curve, so expect to adjust at least a little to even the ''easy'' distros. All of those except SuSE should have ISO''s for download. If you''re willing to learn lots of the low level stuff try Slackware, Debian (what I''m using ), or Gentoo.

quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Linux is also free, and so is almost everything for it. linux is the hacker''s choice. Hackers who are prone to pirating (second only to AOL 15 year olds). So if you plan to develope for linux, plan to do it for free.

I can''t see any logic behind that. Some people will choose to use Linux so that they don''t have to pirate an OS, after all. You seem to have the wrong definition of hacker too, but it''s hard to tell which wrong one (the media''s seems most likely).

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There is plently of stuff for linux that costs money.

Oh *do not* get gentoo for your first distro AFAIK it has no installer. It is a good distro but definetely not for beginners.
I''d get Redhat. Sure linux Mandrake is more user friendly but once I started getting into linux I didn''t like the way it did stuff.

Oh if you have a 56k then it''s probably a better idea to buy rather than d/l the distro you choose

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quote:
Original post by Monder
Oh if you have a 56k then it''s probably a better idea to buy rather than d/l the distro you choose


Monder makes an excellent point here. Distros come in a number of forms - but having it on CD is very helpful. To that end, back in 2000 I fired up "GetRight" and let it run for 3 days downloading the then latest RedHat ISO. Yes it took 3 days @ 56k (do the math). Needlesstosay, I did this over a weekend that I was going out of town You can also buy already burned distros or have a friend with a faster connection burn one off for you. Even if later, you decide that you want to stick with XP on your new box - slap Linux on your old box. It will run on your old box better than W98 did, at least it has for me.

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quote:
Original post by AndreTheGiant

Im currently using windows 98 (on possibly the oldest computer ever!) I plan on getting a new computer soon, and Ive been looking at windows XP professional, and Im not sure if i like it. Ive only got to use it for maybe an hour or so, but It reminds me of some sort of Fisher Price operating system. It really likes to hold your hand for everything you do ( you cant even search for a file without some gay little paper-clip or dog or something trying to help you along ). Not exactly my idea of ''professional''.

How do I decide (quickly) if Linux is for me? Ive only ever used it for a short while at school, and even then, i only used the simple point-click interface (I dont know all the fancy little commands).


Looking at the way you handle computers (calling Windows ''gay'' because of a wizard, totally ignoring the fact that XP is based on the W2000/NT kernel and thus totally professional), and not really having used Linux, I''d say stick with Windows.

For beginners Linux is nice if you use that lame desktop, but real men would use the command line. And that''s a very steep learning curve.

Sure, with some trouble you can set up Emacs to compile and show errors in the editor window, otherwise it''s just editing files, saving them, running ''make'', noticing the ''syntax error in line 598 in file3.c'' and editing again. It has nothing like VC++, no context sensitive help, no completion, just bare bones. Linux (and UNIX) are about textfiles, editing, processing, sorting them. If you don''t like typing "awk -F: ''{print $5}'' < /etc/passwd" or ''sed c/a[b-c]*$/$1../g'' all the time then maybe Linux isn''t for you.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Fidelio_
...but real men would use the command line.

Sure, with some trouble you can set up Emacs to compile and show errors in the editor window, otherwise it''s just editing files, saving them, running ''make'', noticing the ''syntax error in line 598 in file3.c'' and editing again. It has nothing like VC++, no context sensitive help, no completion, just bare bones. Linux (and UNIX) are about textfiles, editing, processing, sorting them. If you don''t like typing "awk -F: ''{print $5}'' < /etc/passwd" or ''sed c/a[b-c]*$/$1../g'' all the time then maybe Linux isn''t for you.



Sounds like it''s for people that think their hard because they like making life difficult for themselves. VC++ may ''hold your hand'' but it is far more efficient than doing everything manually with no help.

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