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Scene Graph Help

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At the moment I''m using OpenGL to begin my first 3D game. I''m very interested in obtaining a scene graph to help manage all the necessary objects and so forth. Can you suggest a scene graph API that''s rich in features for 3D game development as well as providing a logical environment to work under? Despite the Scene Graph encapsulating OpenGL I still would like access to this lower level, just in case. I''m making use of a terrain engine called Demeter which accesses OpenGL directly (I do have its source code) and would like to be able to easily integrate it into the scene graph, in case the API doesn''t have any decent terrain routines. At the moment I''m eyeing a few scene graph APIs: Gizmo3D, OpenSceneGraph (OSG), OpenRM, and SGL. I still havent been able to skim through each of their docs/demos but would appreciate any thoughts you have on them. Again, the ideal Scene Graph would be one that establishes a very simple and logical working environment, manages trivial/annoying duties, supplies useful functions like loaders and vector math routines, provides a few useful effects routines, allows me access to the lower level OpenGL API, and I can integrate current libraries (ie. Demeter terrain engine) into it. Thanks for any info. I''m using WindowsXP, AMD Athlon 1Gig, Geforce 2 GTS, MS Visual C++ 6.

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Here at gamedev very few are intressted in using a scenegraph, although every second guy here writes his own 3d engine. I asked about that topic a few weeks ago and didn't get much feedback either. So i canceled this whole 'scene graph' thing in my project.

Maybe plib's Simple Scene Graph intressts you, but it does not meet your requirements (its mainly wirten for linux)

[edited by - Jonus on September 11, 2002 6:34:23 PM]

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The scene graph is the most imporant part of any game engine.
Every game has one, even Quake. It has one bsp node, and an array of players. The bsp node does most of the work in Quake.

The service the scene graph provides is object culling (that means collision detection). This runs the game - from determining what the player has clicked on, what his avatar has crashed into, to determining visibility.

It can be handled in a number of different ways, but every game has one (much like every person has a personality, even if it''s uninteresting).

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