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BASIC or C+?

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Is it necessary for me to learn BASIC first before moving on to C. I am increasing my interest in developing computer and video games and would like to know what type of programming language would I need to learn first?

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go straight to C.
believe me it''s easy enough to learn and there''s plenty of tutorials, here and on the web.

learning basic is not necessary.
but one thing. you might want to find a good book on data structures also. someone here should be able to tell you of one.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
According to the title of your post the question is BASIC vs C++, but according to the body it is BASIC vs C. Do not confuse the two languages. Though they seem similar C++ can (and should) be learned and used as a completely different language. I suggest starting with "Accelerated C++".

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VB is a joke, and Microsoft laughed about it all the way to the bank.

If you want to make a VB-like application, just use MFC. I honestly think C++ (with MFC) is as easy (if not easier) than that horrid VB.

Learn C++, and the book "Core C++" is a great book to start with, even though the target audience is not necessarily beginners. I am just starting to get really into the book, and I really think it is the best book I have read covering C++.

Don''t rule out learning C, though. Both C and C++ are verstatile languages, each with different strengths and short-comings.

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I wouldn''t say VB is a joke, rather that it''s not as efficient/useful as C++. It still has its uses. I think VB should be looked upon as a scripting language that is interpreted by something written in much faster C++.

Which would you rather learn, the lowly interpreted Basic language, or the fast compiled C++ language that does the interpreting? The prince or the pauper? It''s up to you. I got into Windows programming with Visual Basic, then moved on to Win32API/C++.

Just remember that BASIC works only on windows, and when the revolution comes it will be wiped out.

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It doesn''t matter. It''s all concepts anyway.

VB isn''t the only form of BASIC. QuickBASIC is a good choice as a first language for learning concepts. However, it doesn''t really matter. QB lets you do more faster initially but it can only take you so far. If you start with C++ you won''t be making graphical games for awhile and even text based games are a pain to make since you can only do typewriter text.

If you start with QB you can do any type of game you want (even 3D to a limited extent) and then make the switch to OpenGL/DirectX with C++ much easier since at the switch you already know the concepts so you can focus on learning the new syntax. You want to start off learning as little overhead as possible.

Ben




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VB is definitely NOT a joke. It is a fine language for just about anything that doesn''t require a lot of close interaction with the hardware or OS. I''ve used it to write Client/Server systems for years and can turn out a very solid system in less time with VB than with C/C++. Just because a language or tool doesn''t fit the type of work you are currently doing doesn''t mean it deserves to be ridiculed.

That having been said, I would NOT use VB for games. You will find that VB hides some of what goes on behind the scenes in terms of memory management, etc. This is fine for business apps where an extra quarter-second to display a bitmap isn''t going to be noticed. But in the gaming world you need complete control, and that is what C and C++ give you. Also C++ is truly object oriented. VB made a quasi-decent attempt at getting its programmers to think in and object oriented fashion but C++ does it at a much more "pure" level.

One more plug for C. There is an ANSI standard for C. So learning C doesn''t tie you to Microsoft platforms. Granted, if you moved from Windows to Unix you would still have a learning curve. But at least that curve wouldn''t include having to learn an entirely new language. Just something to ponder.

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While I''d have to agree with l99057j about VB not being a joke (entirely), VB is not portable.

C/C++ code is. MFC isn''t portable either. Heck, even win32 isn''t portable. MFC is just Microsoft''s way of handling apps written in C/C++ a little easier than straight C/C++ calls to the Windows OS.

If you''re considering any cross-platform compatability at all, then C/C++ is the way to go.

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I''d start with Python. You can start learning and get something going in a few hours. You don''t compile/link, so it''s a lot quicker to try things out (and you''ve got interactive mode where you can play around).

After you get the basics, download PyGame. It''s VERY easy to get something nice on the screen without much hassle. No mallocs, no pointers, no nothing.

Python is actually a huge language, with a massive standard library, and a syntax which gets things done quickly and easily. Go for it, and you''ll never regret it.

(and it''s portable, if that''s what you''re looking for. and free.)

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