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Ok, I have this problem. I''m not good at math at all. I came out of high school teaching myself C and becoming a database programmer using Pro*C(C with SQL embedded). I have taken high school math, well up to Algebra II that is. When reading game programming books, I understand the code and what''s going on with the code (except for a few code pieces here and there), but I get lost with some of the math algorithms. When looking at the code, I understand what the math is doing, but when the author shows Trigonometry or Vectors or Matrices, etc., on paper, I’m lost with the equations. I know this is because of my limited background in math I don''t know stuff like math symbols, etc. Equations likes this lose me: (x - x2) = m1*(y - y2), math on both sides of the equal sign just completely throws me off. Now when they show me an equation in like Trig on paper and than show it in code, I understand the code completely but 100% lost with the math on paper. So, I start having trouble when writing the game code and saying, how do I put this in code, the author is using all these equations. I am taking some Math classes at the college next semester, but I don''t want to wait tell the end of that semester to start programming games. So does anyone know any good sites to learn the math I have to know and at the same time show me why I would need this math in my program and different situations I would need to use the math? The math is really discouraging me a great deal but I am going to stick with it, just need someone to help me find a good book or good url on learning the math. I know I’m asking allot, but I hope someone can help. braves

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Start out looking for high-school algebra books. They have lots of examples and problems solved for you. And lots of equations that have both sides happening that you can learn to manipulate. Once you''ve learned how to manipulate equations you have the tools to move onto the next step(s).
And the manipulations can be fun.

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I don''t know any good books myself, but when you look, try and find math books or sites that give you -practical- explanations of equations, and real-life situations where you would use them. Things always stick in the mind better when you can see a memorable application to use it in. You''ll learn more, and quicker, from a book with hypothetical situations rather than reams of numbers.

Example: If you travel 80 miles and get there in 117 minutes, how many miles did you travel per minute? This could be expressed as 80x = 117, where ''x'' is your unknown quantity. Now, that is an overly simple example, but it''s more memorable than "find x where 80x = 117".

Example2: If someone bought 7 apples and 6 oranges for $1.25, and someone else bough 4 apples and 11 oranges for $1.32, can you work out how much apples and oranges cost? This is ''just'' a simultaneous equation: 7x + 6y = 125 and 4x + 11y = 132. (Apples are x, oranges are y).

Once you see how ''real'' (ok, the above are a little contrived) situations map to equations, then it all starts to make a little more sense. Good luck with your learning.

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