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DevLiquidKnight

Code question?

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I was wondering with all the languages will they still be using C++ in the next few years? Or will everything be shifting to .NET or C# ? By everything I mean is it better to learn C++ C# or .NET when you trying to become a game programmer. Or does it even matter? Kinda confused on exactly what language is going to be used in a few more years and if C++ will ever fade away

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Fruny    1658
Yes. No. Both. No. Unlikely.

A language is a tool designed for a specific set of tasks.
Learning a single language will limit you untolerably.
Learning several languages let you pick the most adapted in any given situations.

Think about learning other types of languages (scripting, functional, OO ...)


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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
In the next few years everybody will code in assembler - possibly hex (for optimisation, of course.)

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
In the next few years everybody will code in assembler - possibly hex (for optimisation, of course.)

LoL don''t they already and a compiler converts it to assembler

I do know many languages im just trying to figure out what is best to learn EXTENSIVELY

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Personally I don''t think c++ will fade away, not in a few years. I even like to think in c++ and solve problem with its paradigm, and I''m sure I''m not alone.

people program in machine language, and then came C, which was a level up (problem solving layer wise). It was widely used. Then came C++, which is also a level up. A lot of C programmers converted to C++ (I think, I don''t really know and please don''t flame me on this). The new languages, be it C#, VB.NET, even Java, are still not higher that C++ in the problem solving layer. Thus I don''t believe any of them will take over C++''s place, not now not in the future.

If a new programming "language" come and let you "write" (may not even need to literally write/type) a complete app without writing loops, ifs, and also let you develop the app in much less time than c++, then it will likely to make c++ fade away. Of course recent IDEs and their wizards don''t count.

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Mr Bakbugawk    122
Is it assembler or assembly? I thought the language was assembly and an assembler is what converts the code into machine code. I have heard people use the two interchangably and now I am confused?!

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Assembler is what converts it to machine code.

I read once somewhere that the languages correct name is assembler. However, I don''t give a @#$@!$%^$#$ if people call it assembly or assembler. I use both depending on my mood. Assembler if I feel a bit saucy and assembly for casual speech... Ya know...

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quote:
Original post by Mr Bakbugawk
Is it assembler or assembly? I thought the language was assembly and an assembler is what converts the code into machine code. I have heard people use the two interchangably and now I am confused?!


This thing called the C++ compiler converts your C++ code into assembler code and writes the assembler as machine code into a exe file. That is how a compiler makes your application.

And as for assembler and assembly its the same thing people just have this strange conspiarcy to say it differen''t ways (thats a guess). Technically I think assembler is the thing that compiles your assembly code therefore you could almost say it both ways. So its like saying I write my code in C but I use a C++ compiler to compile it.

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Fruny    1658
Unless I''m mistaken, the first ''high-level'' programming language - that superceded assembly - was Fortran I in 1954. Fortran has gone through several evolution (the latest version is dated from 1990 IIRC). Fortran is still in use, in the domain it was designed for - scientific programming (heck, my brother is learning it as part of his Chemical Engineering curriculum).

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
1945 baby... oh yeah...
http://www.computer.org/annals/an1997/a2017abs.htm

Then fortran, then lisp (''56?)

Though, I''d agree fortran was the first widely accepted language.

Anybody know objective-c? looks like fun stuff...

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by DevLiquidKnight
I always wanted to use forthran but i never could find a free compiler hehe


g77. Any *nix distro will have it.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by DevLiquidKnight
What is objective-c? I have never heard of this must understand must learn!


http://www.geom.umn.edu/software/w3kit/overview/objective-c.html

google is good

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_the_phantom_    11250
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
If a new programming "language" come and let you "write" (may not even need to literally write/type) a complete app without writing loops, ifs, and also let you develop the app in much less time than c++, then it will likely to make c++ fade away. Of course recent IDEs and their wizards don''t count.


Even that wont cause C++ to fade away, that langauge would be better suited to things which arent games, because as you become more abstract you lose low level control of things, if that wasnt the case then alot more commerical games would be written in complied BASIC and not C and C++

imho, C and C++ will never go away, I think its a nice mid-point between the speed of pure assembler and the abstractness of things such as BASIC

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