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QBomb

Uptime in Linux

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Is there a text file somewhere in /proc that tells how long the system has been running? Sorry, kinda new to Linux =/ Any help in appreciated

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/proc/uptime is what you are looking for. IIRC, it contains two values, the first one being the uptime in seconds.

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Thanks for the reply. /proc/uptime is what I''m lookin'' for. Didn''t know what the two values meant, though.

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YEAH! 5:01 hours uptime! I ROCK!

How do people get to several days uptime? Do they not turn their computers off at night? Are they all freaks who require no sleep? I can understand servers having long uptimes, but what about these ordinary joes running Linux on a desktop machine?

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quote:
Original post by BradDaBug
How do people get to several days uptime? Do they not turn their computers off at night?

Yes. I turn mine off when there''s not something that I''m working on that I''d like to leave running because my machine is pretty loud .

QBomb: I didn''t know you actually wanted the file, at least Martee was helpful .

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quote:
Original post by BradDaBug
YEAH! 5:01 hours uptime! I ROCK!

How do people get to several days uptime? Do they not turn their computers off at night? Are they all freaks who require no sleep? I can understand servers having long uptimes, but what about these ordinary joes running Linux on a desktop machine?


Try 5 years uptime and no crashes... That''s how long the School Commission I work for had their server up( it''s mainly a web server but it also hosts some files ). Also, our SAN running RedHat has been up for 1 year now and has been running like a charm...




[Cyberdrek | the last true sorcerer | Spirit Mage - mutedfaith.com]

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quote:
Original post by BradDaBug
How do people get to several days uptime? Do they not turn their computers off at night? Are they all freaks who require no sleep? I can understand servers having long uptimes, but what about these ordinary joes running Linux on a desktop machine?


Who are you calling a freak... My linux box never sleeps and I mean my desktop. FYI, computers aren''t supposed to be shutdown, they are supposed to stay on for as long as possible. Although Wincrap still has some problems with that. Last I checked, 27 days was the longest you could leave Win98 up before it crashed...






[Cyberdrek | the last true sorcerer | Spirit Mage - mutedfaith.com]

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Computer''s aren''t supposed to shut down? Who says?

Sure, hard drives have a limit number of start/stop cycles, but so does everything.

And computers use a lot of power. Leaving the computer on all the time even when it''s not used adds a few extra $ to the power bill.

What if everyone left their computer on all the time? Think of all the extra energy it''d take to power them all! Think of how much coal and oil and uranium it''d take to make all that power!

If you care anything at all about the enviroment, you''ll turn your computer off, you uncaring freak!

But who says you''re not supposed to turn your computer off?

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quote:
Original post by BradDaBug
Computer''s aren''t supposed to shut down? Who says?

We says.

quote:

And computers use a lot of power. Leaving the computer on all the time even when it''s not used adds a few extra $ to the power bill.

Modern computers have features like ACPI and APM. When your computer is in sleep mode, it uses less electricity. When you consider that more electricity is required to start a computer (just like an engine, or any other system overcoming inertia of any form), that whole electricity bill issue becomes moot.

Macs have always been "always-on" computers. Think about it. The power switch is on the keyboard.

(Falling more in love with OS X by the day...)

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