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IONBURST

Help for the 13 year old newbie? :)

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So, I''m 13 and I have BASIC esperince, but I wan''t to work with C++. And I don''t really want a book. Can I get some help? (I already have a compiler) ~IONBURST

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Why don''t you want a book? I was 13 when i leared C++ (only 4 years ago). I actually learned C first, I read the "C For Dummies" series. Best programming books i''ve ever read. They are really easy to learn, much better than those "Teach Yourself in 21 days" crap. But if you really hate books, you could try taking a course at your highschool, mine offers a basic C++ course. Other than that i don''t see much of a way to learn. i would imagine that learning over someone from the internet would be quite tough and just like reading a book. If that''s what you had in mind.

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hey i am ownly 14 just turned it on the 1st...anyway i would highly recommend a book go to and read "c++ in 21 days" then should go and buy "C++: The complete refernce" best damn C++ book ever. once you have C++ down then you should read a lot of the content online. What i am saying you probably you have to read a book no matter what. Even if you do take a class they are probably going to give a book.

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Hehehe......first i highly recommend you get Microsoft Visual C++, i started off using Borlands Complier and realized that most API librarys were designed for VC++, it will also make coding more easier.
And dont listen to the above shite, because im 14, and i learned all my C++ from Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours and i thought it was so good i bought the Direct X7 version of the books.

Also remember these things:
1: Dont look at other peoples code, because it will make you confused and will also put u off.

2: After w while you''ll find out that its a very powerful and easy to use language

Martin W

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Man I wish I started C++ at 13 I started programming in BASIC when I was 9 (on my old IBM XT heh).

Anyhow, the first book I picked up was Teach Yourself C Programming in 21 days. You can jump right into C++ if you want - my next book was Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days.

Another very important thing is not took look at other peoples code and compare it to your own. Obviously you can look for techniques and tricks but do NOT follow their design. Most of the code I've seen out there is *horribly* designed. It may work but its ugly.

Speaking of design - do NOT neglect the analytical side of programming. Learning how to use object modelling methods such as UML (Unified Modelling Lanugage) and start learning about patterns. Read the book "Design Patterns".

There is really no way to learn C++ without reading a book. Why do you think schools use them?

Dire

Edited by - Dire.Wolf on 4/14/00 6:07:56 PM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I am 14 years old, and I stated C++ this year. I suggest tou get Visual C++ because it is easy to use. A good book to get would be Windows Game Programming for Dummies. It teachs alot about programming games, and using DirectX.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Okay, first of all, if you''re wondering, I''m a 15-year-old guy (David Mullen); I do C, Perl, and assembly language in my spare time.

Now, about your post. I could rant about several things concerning programming, I suppose, but I won''t. There''s only one thing I really need to tell you, and that is: READ THE BLASTED SOURCE CODE.

Yeah, I see that several people have told you that (a) you need to get a book, and (b) you should despise other people''s code. I''m not here to flame; I''m just here to say that, if you want to learn engineering, you''ve got to look at engineering.

There''s bad code out there, I submit; a lot of it. You don''t want to follow someone else''s bad coding style blindly. But, I say, why should you learn only from successes? Why not examine failures, too? If you know what can go wrong, you can avoid problems before they happen. Knowing what not to do is important. Also, learning to fix those errors is a valuable skill.

And, though some folks seem reluctant to admit it, there''s good code out there, too. A lot of programmers--game programmers in particular--tend to get caught up in the belief that (a) their code is perfect, and (b) everyone else''s code is deserving of eternal damnation. It''s an Ego Thing, you understand. Obviously, you''ll have to get over that if you want to work efficiently with other programmers; you can''t be so pompous about your code and have such a dim view of everyone else''s.

Sometimes (okay, most of the time) I''m arrogant, too, but I''m striving to squish that attitude. I''m striving to accept the fact that I''m not the only able programmer in the world, and that I''m far from the best.

And so, recently, I started looking at other people''s code. You see, until that happened, I didn''t really have a good design philosophy. You need to get advice from other people, in the form of their code.

So please, I beg you: Download code. Get as much as you can, and tinker with it. Compare design methods, compare styles, compare techniques. Store the best of everything for later use. And above all, use common sense.

Oh, and about books. Books are nice, but they aren''t necessary. Let me stress, again, that code is the most valuable thing. A book is merely a supplementary reference. If you want one--well, I haven''t read many, but Tom Swan is an excellent teacher. (I''ve read Type and Learn C.)

In conclusion: read code, read code, and read code. I want to make sure you understand that; it will save you a lot of grief. Another way of saying it is: run from arrogance. Don''t let it eat you alive.

I hope this helps you out, and I wish you the best of luck.

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1st - you don''t want any books? you freak! - IMHO a real book (or at least real paper) is so much better than a code listing on the screen - you don''t have to switch windows (unless you have a dual screen setup - which rocks btw )but thats just my opinion

maybe you meant you don''t want to BUY a book - well id try

1) your school library (probably wont have much)
2) your city library (maybe more depending on where you are)
3) the libraries of surrounding colleges (these rock!)
or..
4) www.itknowledge.com - click on free archive (on the left)

well good luck..

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you know what? you need a book to understand everything, AND the code to see how it''s done, and to see what you can and can''t do. everybody''s right, but to go off code alone is downright insane. actually, no, ionburst, you try that, maybe you''ll succeed, and maybe, you''ll conclude on yer own that looking at this code is just downright insane. anyway, yeah, there are a whole buncha tutorials anyway, which is neither a book, nor straight code, it''s a hybrid, and i feel this is the best. so, yeah, i want you to look at that goddam windows code and try to figure it out, and you tell me if you get it.

browse around this site, it''s got plenty of help.

a2k

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