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Help for the 13 year old newbie? :)

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So, I''m 13 and I have BASIC esperince, but I wan''t to work with C++. And I don''t really want a book. Can I get some help? (I already have a compiler) ~IONBURST

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Why don''t you want a book? I was 13 when i leared C++ (only 4 years ago). I actually learned C first, I read the "C For Dummies" series. Best programming books i''ve ever read. They are really easy to learn, much better than those "Teach Yourself in 21 days" crap. But if you really hate books, you could try taking a course at your highschool, mine offers a basic C++ course. Other than that i don''t see much of a way to learn. i would imagine that learning over someone from the internet would be quite tough and just like reading a book. If that''s what you had in mind.

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hey i am ownly 14 just turned it on the 1st...anyway i would highly recommend a book go to and read "c++ in 21 days" then should go and buy "C++: The complete refernce" best damn C++ book ever. once you have C++ down then you should read a lot of the content online. What i am saying you probably you have to read a book no matter what. Even if you do take a class they are probably going to give a book.

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Hehehe......first i highly recommend you get Microsoft Visual C++, i started off using Borlands Complier and realized that most API librarys were designed for VC++, it will also make coding more easier.
And dont listen to the above shite, because im 14, and i learned all my C++ from Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours and i thought it was so good i bought the Direct X7 version of the books.

Also remember these things:
1: Dont look at other peoples code, because it will make you confused and will also put u off.

2: After w while you''ll find out that its a very powerful and easy to use language

Martin W

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Man I wish I started C++ at 13 I started programming in BASIC when I was 9 (on my old IBM XT heh).

Anyhow, the first book I picked up was Teach Yourself C Programming in 21 days. You can jump right into C++ if you want - my next book was Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days.

Another very important thing is not took look at other peoples code and compare it to your own. Obviously you can look for techniques and tricks but do NOT follow their design. Most of the code I've seen out there is *horribly* designed. It may work but its ugly.

Speaking of design - do NOT neglect the analytical side of programming. Learning how to use object modelling methods such as UML (Unified Modelling Lanugage) and start learning about patterns. Read the book "Design Patterns".

There is really no way to learn C++ without reading a book. Why do you think schools use them?

Dire

Edited by - Dire.Wolf on 4/14/00 6:07:56 PM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I am 14 years old, and I stated C++ this year. I suggest tou get Visual C++ because it is easy to use. A good book to get would be Windows Game Programming for Dummies. It teachs alot about programming games, and using DirectX.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Okay, first of all, if you''re wondering, I''m a 15-year-old guy (David Mullen); I do C, Perl, and assembly language in my spare time.

Now, about your post. I could rant about several things concerning programming, I suppose, but I won''t. There''s only one thing I really need to tell you, and that is: READ THE BLASTED SOURCE CODE.

Yeah, I see that several people have told you that (a) you need to get a book, and (b) you should despise other people''s code. I''m not here to flame; I''m just here to say that, if you want to learn engineering, you''ve got to look at engineering.

There''s bad code out there, I submit; a lot of it. You don''t want to follow someone else''s bad coding style blindly. But, I say, why should you learn only from successes? Why not examine failures, too? If you know what can go wrong, you can avoid problems before they happen. Knowing what not to do is important. Also, learning to fix those errors is a valuable skill.

And, though some folks seem reluctant to admit it, there''s good code out there, too. A lot of programmers--game programmers in particular--tend to get caught up in the belief that (a) their code is perfect, and (b) everyone else''s code is deserving of eternal damnation. It''s an Ego Thing, you understand. Obviously, you''ll have to get over that if you want to work efficiently with other programmers; you can''t be so pompous about your code and have such a dim view of everyone else''s.

Sometimes (okay, most of the time) I''m arrogant, too, but I''m striving to squish that attitude. I''m striving to accept the fact that I''m not the only able programmer in the world, and that I''m far from the best.

And so, recently, I started looking at other people''s code. You see, until that happened, I didn''t really have a good design philosophy. You need to get advice from other people, in the form of their code.

So please, I beg you: Download code. Get as much as you can, and tinker with it. Compare design methods, compare styles, compare techniques. Store the best of everything for later use. And above all, use common sense.

Oh, and about books. Books are nice, but they aren''t necessary. Let me stress, again, that code is the most valuable thing. A book is merely a supplementary reference. If you want one--well, I haven''t read many, but Tom Swan is an excellent teacher. (I''ve read Type and Learn C.)

In conclusion: read code, read code, and read code. I want to make sure you understand that; it will save you a lot of grief. Another way of saying it is: run from arrogance. Don''t let it eat you alive.

I hope this helps you out, and I wish you the best of luck.

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1st - you don''t want any books? you freak! - IMHO a real book (or at least real paper) is so much better than a code listing on the screen - you don''t have to switch windows (unless you have a dual screen setup - which rocks btw )but thats just my opinion

maybe you meant you don''t want to BUY a book - well id try

1) your school library (probably wont have much)
2) your city library (maybe more depending on where you are)
3) the libraries of surrounding colleges (these rock!)
or..
4) www.itknowledge.com - click on free archive (on the left)

well good luck..

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you know what? you need a book to understand everything, AND the code to see how it''s done, and to see what you can and can''t do. everybody''s right, but to go off code alone is downright insane. actually, no, ionburst, you try that, maybe you''ll succeed, and maybe, you''ll conclude on yer own that looking at this code is just downright insane. anyway, yeah, there are a whole buncha tutorials anyway, which is neither a book, nor straight code, it''s a hybrid, and i feel this is the best. so, yeah, i want you to look at that goddam windows code and try to figure it out, and you tell me if you get it.

browse around this site, it''s got plenty of help.

a2k

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i think gamedev have some c++ tutorials

I''m gonna annoy you all now because i learnt c++ by using "Learn Visual C++ Now". i only read the first 5 chapters (the rest was mfc crap) and i was on my way!

enough rambling

MENTAL

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Do not consider jumping into C++ without a book. As I see it, Its a long jump from ''GOTO'' of BASIC to classes in c++. First thing you should concentrate on should be learning the semantics of the language. It is boring in the begining, learning where to place the brackets etc, but mastery comes only with time & experience.

The other thing is, You can look at other people''s source code if you want to, but I don''t think you will make much sense of it right now.

Have fun!

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Hey Ionburst. If you are still reading these, please put a reply on here quick so I know I''m not wasting my time. Thanks.

OK. I am 15 yrs old and I have been programming since MS Basic 2.0 on the Commodore 128. Good old days. I was about 6 yrs old and I was so darn proud of myself. I worked my way up through mastering QB4.5 (spent like 5 solid years of programming here) then VB4,5,6. I loved basic.

Then I met C++ a few months ago. I had had a very very bad experience with it a while back (MSVC++1.0) and had given up, but then I got 6.0 and someone convinced me to read SAMS Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days (NOT VISUAL C++ IN 21 DAYS! This goes into MFC junk!). I read through it and got all the internal workings down and then d/l''ded DX7.0a SDK (best time I ever spent) and it is so much much faster and better. WARNING: C++ IS A CONTROL FREAK AND WILL MAKE YOU ONE.

If you have any really in-depth experience in QB (over 50000 line programs) then you should not have a problem after learning the basic syntax of C++. You just have to get a bunch of really good libraries (here called API''s) and learn to use the ones that come with your compiler. BOOKS ARE YOUR FRIENDS!!! Take this from someone who went through this torture before. Also, avoid my pain and learn DirectX and that AFTER C++.

Check out my first finished C++ program at www.geocities.com/benbeandogdilts on my downloads page. (Squirms) and my final great QB attempt, BeanWars.

~BenDilts( void );

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I turned 13 a few months ago, and I''ve been programming in C++ for over a year now I think, so I started at age 11-12. Books are the best way to learn. You should check out www.informit.com, it''s free registration and you get access to Sam''s Learn C++ in 21 Days or something like that. Now I''m into game programming and OpenGL (I wonder why people call me nerd and geek..

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I think books are one of the easiest ways to learn. I learned C when I was 8 and C++ when I was something like 9 and a half, and books were the ONLY way I could learn. (I''m 14 now)

"When people tell you they want to hear the truth, you know that their lying."

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I learned C++ from a book. It was Learn C++ in 24 hours. Man that book was good. I learned so much from it and wanted to make games so badly I stopped reading it at chapter 17. I then bought Andre Lamothe''s Window''s Game Programming For Dummies. That book is good, but you should get his newest one instead. Another book that I think is a must have is Charles Petzolds Programming Windows 95. That book is really cool.

Visit http://members.xoom.com/ivanickgames

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I started C++ when I was 12....(I am 13 now). I first bought "C++ in 21 days" then "C++: The Complete Reference." "C++ in 21 days" was too long and confusing. "C++: The Complete Reference" got to the point very quickly.

I don''t see how you can learn programming without a book!
Teaching yourself isn''t very smart and is impossible.

I am not really sure if learning the Standard Template Library and C++ File I/O is necessary for game programming. Can someone please tell me?

Thanks...

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Nope. The STL does however provide a nice set of predefined classes such as lists and strings for you to use, which you''ll most certainly end up recreating in some form if you don''t go with the STL. This of course depends on the complexity of the game you want to make. As for C++ file I/O, that too isn''t essential. You could stick with standard C I/O or even go for platform-specific I/O, like Win32''s CreateFile()/OpenFile()/ReadFile()/WriteFile().

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I was 9 when I first learnt C, Although I first started programming when I was about 4 years old (NO Lie I swear on the QL Sinclair, in SuperBasic). So I''ve been coding in C/C++/ASM etc for about half my life (I''m 18 now).

Anyways, if you wanna learn how to code a great game for Windows then I recommend:-

i) Get ''Teach yourself Windows Game Programming for Dummies'' By André Lamothe.

ii) Get a MSVC++ compiler (If you have a limited budget, then scour the .net/ask your friends if they have a copy - do what you think is nescary. after all if you really want to code you''ll be willing to make the investment / Download )

iii) Don''t bother learning C++ at the moment, C is far easier to learn, and most games are coded in C with the exception of a few shit games LOL.

iv) Design your program in a structured manner <-- This is the key to a succesful Game/Application!!!!!!

/Memir

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Actually, the best way to learn C or C++ is by trial and error, of course, you need to understand the proper way to indent, use functions and structs and of course, let us not forget, the right way to create classes( c++ ) that''s how I learned it and then I got some books on game programming and win 32 api. I also checked the ANSI C standards to learn the proper way of coding... Anyhow, that''s how I got into it. Oh and BTW, there is no such thing as a bad book or a greatest book ever to learn C or C++.



Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
DLC Multimedia
Two Guys Soft

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Damn, I wish I started so young with C! I started doing basic on the C64 when I was 8, but then I didn''t do much with it after I was 12. A few years later, when I was 16, we got taught pascal in the education I am still attending, Technical Computer Science. But only the first year, because the last 2 years we''ve been learning C and ASM.

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I started C when I was 10, and C++ when I was 11. I used Beginning C and Beginning visual C++ 5 from Wroxpress. These books are rather good.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I don''t really care much for c. But on the other hand i LOVE
P[p]erl it is the best get it learn it love it.

The books i have read......
well 400000 tutorials [not worth it]
teach yourself perl in 21 days [it was great]
man pages on perl [also great]
perl referance [blah blah GREAT!!!]

Actually what i read before these counted toward more experiance for instance....

Unix in a bash::shell [this is awsome]
Unix referance
and also QBasic programming for dummies [SUX to old and i hate the language in general]

A HELL OF ALOT OF CGI AND THE SET OF SAMS BOOKS.

Basically reading is the importance of most or if you prfer the lazy attemp and get some poor sould to teach you [not really lazy i just consider it to be].

The basics of life
#1. Teachers are well most are pretty DUMB
#2. Read or experiance your on your own
#3. Study others work. - Listen i know most of you disagree with this because you hate hard coded stuff or something my look at this issue is leanr from the worst the best and the inbetween and you''ll know all that each know which means your even better now (:^().

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Read books, look at source code, mess with the numbers and stuff in the source code, put most of the huge ideas for games in the back of your mind for a while, and get yourself to start simple and work your way up. Dont start with a huge project and learning all the complex stuff of programming, you should start with easier projects otherwise you may become discouraged, confused and annoyed. And there are plenty of good tutorials on the internet for begginers, advanced, just for anything to do with programming. Just take your time.

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Hey. you need to get a book, noone has time to teach you. I am 14, I started c++ when I was 12, and the only knowledge I had before that was html. If you get a book like C++ for dummies, or sams teach yourself c++ in 24 hours. When you dont understand someting then post up a help comment.

~ from the depths of the ocean

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