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revolver

Borderless Window Resizing

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I''m trying to setup a Window to have a certain behaviour -- I need it to be resizable, but not have the WS_THICKFRAME (or equivalent) attribute. I''ve tried toying with various combinations of styles and extended styles, but the only way I could get a resizeable form was to have a border -- which I really don''t want. I''d appreciate any thoughts on the matter...what am I missing that''s undoubtedly obvious?

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There is no way to have a resizeable window without a border -- the WS_THICKFRAME style is equivalent to the WS_SIZEBOX style. You could track custom mouse messages, but I don''t know of any reason why you wouldn''t want to have a resizable window without a border...what are you trying to do? Maybe there is a better way...



- null_pointer
Sabre Multimedia

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you could make a window with a border, but update the non-client area yourself. (you would then have to respond to some of the WM_NC* messages, most notably WM_NCPAINT)

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I'm working on some applications (tools for my engine), but I don't want them to have the standard Windows UI appearance. I suppose I can do my own drawing, or just tough it out...

Thanks. =)

Edited by - revolver on 4/15/00 10:11:18 AM

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I'd advise using DX to do the drawing and input, and look at the articles here on writing your own GUI. It can be as simple as you want it.

[rambling]
However, if it's a (business) Windows app, then you should use the Windows GUI. That's they way it should be -- programmers try to write their own GUI every time, but in a regular (non-game, but business) Windows app, that's bad programming. Windows' GUI is already very functional. One reason why nobody likes Windows' GUI is that no one uses it! Every program has their own "custom" controls, which are neat as a programming accomplishment but serve no real purpose, except to confound the end user. (Look at Netscape's latest browser -- worst example I can find.) There are exceptions to this, but most apps just create headaches for themselves.
[/rambling]

But perhaps it would be easier to just take most of your drawing and input code and use that for your own simple GUI, just because it's easier to get your editors done and you don't care who (outside your development team) has to use them. Custom controls are best used sparingly, at the times when they are absolutely needed.





- null_pointer
Sabre Multimedia


Edited by - null_pointer on 4/15/00 5:32:13 PM

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