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Rainmaker

Ok so I finished NeHe's tutorials... now what?

6 posts in this topic

I read all of NeHe''s tutorials(which, by the way, rule) and now I am wondering where I should go. Does anyone know of some tutorials as good as NeHe''s but more advanced? I need things like bilboarding, camera movement, model loading, ect. Thanks! L8r, The Rainmaker
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welp, why not put his tutorials to work and make something. (like a demo or intro at the very least).

his tuts'' should have given you enough knowledge on how to display a model, now you just have to pick a format (and there are a lot of good ones that are easy to implement) and see if you can read it in and display it. you could visit http://www.wotsit.org and they have tons of descriptions of 3d model formats. I suppose you could pick one that you have access to an editor or there are lots of free meshes out there.. ie: 3d studio max, micro$oft X obj, etc..

billboarding is not a lot different (or maybe i''m wrong) than his particle tutorial, maybe i don''t understand what you mean by billboarding.

camera movement, look at the mesa code or even the d3dutil.cpp file distributed with the directx sdk is pretty nifty (as was hinted to me on this message board) it has some interesting camera routines in there and they even managed to document a good % of their code.. wooopeeee!

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you''ve read NeHe''s tutorials?

now, what to do...

now you can make quake.

a2k
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i do believe gamedev has some excellent resources about this type of stuff (3D theory under programming reference section). It can get bloody confusing (try to find the article on the camera matrix )

MENTAL
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Ok, so I decided to take your word for it and headed over to wotsit.org. Once there I downloaded the file info for the .3ds format(bwahaha .1ds). After reviewing all about those lovely data chunks, I decided I should find a less... complicated file format. To tell the truth all I need for the moment is a file format that holds a texture and coordinates! So, I need one of 2 things: A super-easy file format or 2: a tutorial on loading these(NeHe spoiled me!). Any recomendations?

L8r,
The Rainmaker
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i''ve recommended this one to a lot of people:

www.xdsoft.com/explorer

it converts lotsa file formats to comilable open gl that produces TEXTURE COORDINATES! oooh, yeah. and if you say downloading it is gonna be in a pain in the ass, so is coding your own parser. nobody said programming was easy. that''s why we do it.

a2k
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Hehe, yea 3ds is a bit daunting if you''ve only used models you generated by hand.

However; 3d studio max''s other format (I think it''s called .asc) is all text and VERY easy to implement and debug. Or DirectX''s X object is easy too and most programs that let you model will export to 3dstudio ascii files or directX objects. Or DXF which originates from Autocad is pretty easy too as it''s text aswell.

There are other formats out there but those are the two that come to mind because of the sheer amount of programs that deal with them.

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