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DrjonesDW3d

visual studio .net professional vs visual studio.net professional academic version

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Whats the big difference. Right now i''m using win ME and VC++ 6.0 (well in windows.. most my time is spent in linux) and i''ve been thinking of upgrading to XP and .net for a project i''m working on. I think i can take more advantage of using an IDE that''s not 4 years old. I know the full version of .net is like $1000 plus or minus a hundred... but places like journeyed have the ''academic'' version of .net for $99 bucks. The box in the picture looks the same as the other... it''s still Visual Studio .net professional. So what''s the $900 difference? Since i''m a student it seems like a good deal... but it is really restricted? Ie like al programs start with a little ''this is the student version and applications aren''t ment to be distrubuted" or something? Or is it just the exact same software priced lower for students to get them using it in school so they will stick with it when they are out? Thanks for the help (i would search because i''m sure this has been posted before.. but well yea i can''t really with the search feature not working)

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afaik, vs.net academic is functionally equivalent to vs.net non-academic. i don''t think there are any restrictions on what you can do with your executables either.

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Same thing. The version of VS that inserts the "this programmer is sux0r and so you can only run this on his machine" is the Introductory edition which is given away for free with a bunch of books (I''m pretty sure MS still has it for download somewhere, don''t have a URL though). Academic is the full thing, its just a form of charity a lot of the bigger software venders can afford to do (though it does help get new people hooked on their products)

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If you''re eligible to get the Academic version, you''re probably a college or HS student, right? Most big colleges allow you to get VS .NET Pro (Not Academic) for ~$20; You just borrow their CDs, make copies, and give them back (This is both legal and encouraged). That''s how I got my copy

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well for the most part the above posters are correct. However the licence states that you can not redistribute your executables made with the educational version of VC .net. So now you ask How do they know if I do or not? They are Microsoft they know....Not to be paranoid or anything but it would be fairly easy for MS to tag on a header to each executable file made to determine if it were made with an educational or retail version of their product.

P.S. you can always upgrade to the retail professional version at a considerable decrease in price at a later date.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Well for the most part the above posters are correct. However the licence states that you can not redistribute your executables made with the educational version of VC .net. So now you ask How do they know if I do or not? They are Microsoft they know....Not to be paranoid or anything but it would be fairly easy for MS to tag on a header to each executable file made to determine if it were made with an educational or retail version of their product.

P.S. you can always upgrade to the retail professional version at a considerable decrease in price at a later date.


Could you provide a quote?

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Well for the most part the above posters are correct. However the licence states that you can not redistribute your executables made with the educational version of VC .net. So now you ask How do they know if I do or not? They are Microsoft they know....Not to be paranoid or anything but it would be fairly easy for MS to tag on a header to each executable file made to determine if it were made with an educational or retail version of their product.

P.S. you can always upgrade to the retail professional version at a considerable decrease in price at a later date.


In order to prevent a flamewar with a certain poster, could you provide a quote from the Academic EULA to back this up? There is a clause like this in the Introductory edition, however I do not know of (and many people will say there is not) any such clause in the Academic edition.

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Well, unless you already have one or the other, it''s kind of difficult to see the EULA. Microsoft doesn''t exactly make them available to people unless they buy the product and install it. At which point, if you''ve opened it, you can''t get your money back if you don''t agree with the EULA. It''s a total catch 22, which is an argument unto itself.

Speaking of which, if anyone here happens to have the EULA for the Academic, NFR, Retail, or OEM versions of Win2k Server, feel free to email them to me. I''m trying to save some cash and the difference between some of them is pretty hefty.


Looking for an honest video game publisher? Visit www.gamethoughts.com

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quote:
Original post by Michalson
In order to prevent a flamewar with a certain poster,


Moi?
quote:

Speaking of which, if anyone here happens to have the EULA for the Academic, NFR, Retail, or OEM versions of Win2k Server, feel free to email them to me.


Ooops - just realized you were asking about Win2K... Disregard that mail.



The world holds two classes of men -- intelligent men without religion, and religious men without intelligence. - Abu''l-Ala-Al-Ma''arri (973-1057; Syrian poet)

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