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I''m well.... sorta new so be nice! I am getting ready to goto college and I would like to be a game programmer.... Does any1 have suggestions on classes i should take or major in? I orignally thought to study under Computer Engineering, is this the right choice??? So many questions could someone fill me in? PS- any studying programs or books that helped yourself could ya pass ''em along... thanks

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CS or computer engineering is fine. tho if computer engineering is hardware you probably want to go with computer science.

take all the math courses you can. all of them. especially linear algebra and related fields. calculus, physics, AI, are all extremely helpful as well

-me

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Well I will be attending the University of Louisville which has one of the best engineering programs around and the Computer Engineering is in the software... so is that good enough? Thanks for your time.




-www.phantasysanctum.com-

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Try to find out what the courses are in the program, and compare them against the needs of the game industry.

Since we don't know exactly what your university offers (unless someone else here is in the same program at the same university) it's hard for us to say.

Some people turn out to be very talented game programmers based only on their ability to learn and teach themselves after getting the important algorithms, designs and mathematics down, so that college may provide you just as much of what you need as most.

Remember always, though, that the most important teacher will be practice.


[edited by - Waverider on October 15, 2002 8:25:43 PM]

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honestly, my feeling is that as long as you have badass coding skills and deep graphics/physics/ai (wherever you want to specialize) knowledge your actual major doesn''t really matter. i''ve seen tons of bio/psych/neurobio/physics/math/whatever majors do the game development thing with ample success. some didn''t even take programming classes in college. i wouldn''t necessarily reccomend such an approach b/c it relies on you being motivated enough to learn and produce large quantities of work on your own time.

there''s really no single path for anything career oriented in this world especially when it comes to college majors. the safe bet is definitely to go with a CS or whatever they call it degree b/c most positions will "ask" for a CS or equivalent degree. i''ve definitely found that "requirement" to be highly negotiable assuming you can demonstrate skills with some nice portfolio pieces. tho if you know you want to write physics engines, studying physics is the way to go. if you know you want to do AI work, studying neurobiology or the like is the way to go.

sorry for a somewhat non-answer. the point is that there really isn''t a formula for success. if you are interested in Computer Engineering definetly do that.

-me

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Masamune, go for Computer Engineering. You won''t regret it. The hardware knowledge will give you a very good basis to work from if you ever get into console programming as you will be in tune with the limitations of different processors. I know that my program and yours at UL will probably be a bit different. I went to RIT, www.ce.rit.edu if you want to check it out and compare the two programs.

I never do hardware design right now. But the advanced mathematics that they force you to learn can be very helpful. Not to say you can''t learn it in CS, but you''ll definately learn it in CE. I''ve found that CS tends to be more theory than application. No flames please, that''s just my personal observation, and whatever you say isn''t going to change what I''ve seen.

Fresh out of college I landed a job making mad cash at a company right here in Rochester, which isn''t known for high salaries at all or stable jobs. If you have problems finding a job in the game industry, you''ll at least have a very good degree to fall back on. Don''t take that to mean that a CS degree is worthless. It''s not. But my opinion has always been that I can do both hardware and software, while a CS major is limited to software. This gives you a much more diverse spectrum of companies to send resumes to when looking for jobs.

You might find that you hate hardware or hate software. In which case, with that degree, you''ll be able to change your focus. While I enjoy doing hobby hardware, I hate designing it for companies. But I enjoy doing software, whether for personal use, or for my job. The final decision is yours, but remember that with the ''jack of all trades'' comes the ''master of none''.


Looking for an honest video game publisher? Visit www.gamethoughts.com

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From my own experience I can only recommend Traditional Computer Science. I have a M.Sc. in it specializing in Computer Games (my thesis is here: www.rolemaker.dk) and after that it was quite easy to get a game job.

After I completed the education I chose 3 companies I wanted to work for in my area and sent them applications (ony one had a free job position at the time) and was invited to interviews with all three and offered jobs two places. I was even contacted by a EA talent scout who wanted to interview me for a job in Florida.

So today I have a (i think so myself) cool job making playstation 2 games. So this is a surely way to go if you want to be on safe side.

Of course, this assumes get some working experience with some IT or game related stuff while you study.

Some of the others here say that Computer Engineering is good since you get to do very low-level stuff, but Computer Science is fine for this purpose. I might not have built my own chips, but I have written kernals, drivers, a processor (in simulated environment that is) and compilers and done a lot of assembler. All this is more than enough to do low-level console programming. In fact, it might be a waste of time to learn how to build hardware - hardware is not games. Software is.

Jacob Marner, M.Sc.
Console Programmer, Deadline Games


[edited by - felonius on October 16, 2002 12:57:41 PM]

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quote:
Original post by mtaber
Fresh out of college I landed a job making mad cash at a company right here in Rochester



I''m a computer engineering undergrad, and I was wondering approximately how much money is "mad cash"?

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Mad = Crazy

Crazy = insane

Now you can say Crazy Cash, or Mad Cash, but not insane cash. If he had said Insane amount of Money maybe it would have been clearer for you.

Holla Back

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