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Beginning Game Development

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Hi everyone, I''m an 18 year old student who is currently studying IT at college. In my spare time I have now chosen to start learning about game development. I am not very good with Math and I can hardly do division on paper. Anyway, I am looking to start learning about game development and what technologies/languages I need to embrace in order to develop my own 3D first person shooter. I have plenty of time on my hand, so I am prepared to work hard, but the Math side is troublesome. Could anyway provide a good path for me? Thanks. The Developer[b]

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I''ve not made my first 3D game yet...

But I can provide the way to there:

Learn C/C++, this is more powerful than Visual Basic.

When you have a good grasp on C/C++, start by choosing API you would like to use (OpenGL or DirectX), I can''t recommend one because both is good, and there''s a topic debating this. (In fact, if you do "OpenGL vs DirectX" topic, it will get closed within 2 or 3 posts)

Study that API and program simple games. I''d suggest: Breakout, Tetris, Sidescroller, Asteroids, and Zeldaisque games, in that order.

Then when you''ve done that, you can start on 3D programming.

(shameless plug) You can see where I''m at by downloading my game below (/shameless plug) Although I didnt do the first 3 games, and won''t do Zeldaisque kind of game, I plan on doing Beyaan 2.

Good luck!




Beyaan

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the math isnt as bad as everyone makes it out to be, but mind memory is a must

you need to be able to remeber equations, and when they are used and what they are used for

for instance, to turn mouse movements into camera rotation. you gotta know which function to use, and then you just plug in the values

you dont need to know how it actually works, you just need to know that "this function turns my mouse coordinates into information necessary to rotate my camera in my 3d world around"

and you have definately posted on the best site to learn how to make games.

in 2 days i learned how to make a win32 app in C++ here at GameDev.net

--Fireking

Owner/Leader
Genetics 3rd Dimension Development

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Don't get discouraged with math. The prerequisite for (games) programming is not math. It's about talent and willingness. Games are usually done in more than 1 person, and you can get someone to do the math for you.

However, if you are the only person (like most of us here), you still don't need to worry about math. As long as you understand the concept of +,*,/,-, you're on your way. You don't need to know HOW to do those assignments, but at least you know that 2+9=11, 128/2=64. Computer do the job for you

For a more complex math (and a complex game), you may want to know some trigonometry (physics) and linear algebra (for 3D). But again, if you're thinking about making more complex games, get someone to do the math for you. You just started anyway, so no need to worry about math.


My compiler generates one error message: "does not compile."

[edited by - nicho_tedja on October 20, 2002 11:15:07 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Althought i''d agree that to begin with it can be a little daunting with all the math and classes, etc...
if you simply remember standard 3D equasions, functions and physics what happens is althought you''ll finish the game it''ll be identicle to everyone elses.

To learn someone you must sit there and actually understand why it does what it does... then you can improve upon it.
If you start small you''ll find your math and paths of thought on howto achieve goals actually get larger as a result, because your not remember and this code allows you to use the mouse look, but if you change something in that code - possibly point a variable to a function you''ll end up with head bobbing.

also keep the windows calculator open in Scientific mode with a piece of paper handy - i personally find that helps
Because you can make a quick doodle of what you want to happen figure out what you need to program to figure out and then just add the math in - and the more math you learn the deeper the equasions you can think of to achieve your goal.

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That''s cause making a decent RPG is about the hardest imaginable thing to do. Text or graphics has very little to do with RPG. I wish you luck in your endeavour though.

To the OP:
Follow that link at the top of the page to the "For Beginners" section. Read all the articles there, I have. They are all very good. Most of them, I have printed out and stored in binders to browse when I need an inspiration push.

Good luck, the road is tough, but rewarding.



God was my co-pilot but we crashed in the mountains and I had to eat him...
Landsknecht

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you''re looking for free help/instruction, then I recommend the articles and forums (fora?) here at GameDev.Net. If you''re willing to spend some money, then go check out gameinstitute.com. They offer *very* reasonably priced online classes, with instructor and classmate interaction via forums and scheduled irc chat sessions.

Pentestoy

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