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Optimize this function

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int WordToInteger(Word w)
{
    // convert w into an integer based on the values of letters

    int intnumber = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < w.numletters; ++i)
    {
        intnumber += Math.pow(10, w.numletters-i-1) * elementAt(w.letters[i].id);
    }

    return intnumber;
}
  
This function is used in solving cryptarithmetic problems to convert a word into an integer, so in most cases it''s called at least several thousand times. Needs to be a lot faster. It''s in java..converting to C would probably help, lol. The function elementAt runs constant and is basically just one line, but to keep abstraction i''m using a function call. I guess I''m looking for a way to speed up the 10^i call which is used to create a number one digit at a time. i.e. (10^0 * 5) + (10^1 * 2) = 25 I thought about doing bit-shifting instead of calling the power function, but then realized it only works in base 2. Any suggestions?

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Do it in reverse and keep a digit factor:

  
int WordToInteger(Word w)
{
// convert w into an integer based on the values of letters

int intnumber = 0;
int digitfactor = 1;
for (int i = w.numletters-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
intnumber += digitfactor * elementAt(w.letters[i].id);
digitfactor *= 10;
}
return intnumber;
}

No more pow(...) call. You probably want to make sure that the input passed in is valid too.

Cheers, dorix

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Yeah all non-primitive types are like pointers or references.. you don''t even have a choice. When you create a new instance of anything you have to call new.

Well that definitely helped... now i need to optimize other things and try to reduce the number of times i have to call that function.

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Nothing is pass by reference in Java. Java has no references. Everything is pass by value; it just happens that object variables are pointers to objects on the garbage collected heap, so are passed by pointer value.

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Ah, you are correct. When I''ve worked with hashing strings before, the first letter is the most significant so my method is the one I use. This will give the same output:

  
int WordToInteger(Word w)
{
int intnumber = 0;
for (int i = w.numletters-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
intnumber = 10 * intnumber + elementAt(w.letters[i].id);
}
return intnumber;
}

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I thought everything was passed by reference in Java.

Sorry, I didn't read the entire question and my "C++ cultural assumption" kicked in.
quote:
Original post by DrPizza
Nothing is pass by reference in Java. Java has no references.

Rubbish. Any Java program has references all over the place (whether you call them references or pointers is a different question, albeit a silly one in Java).
quote:

Everything is pass by value

Semantic trickery. If a value is passed into a function, it is passed by copying a reference to a stack-allocated variable (which are nearly always references). Or, if you prefer a different terminology, a new variable is bound to the same value. This has always been known as pass-by-reference.

[edited by - SabreMan on October 22, 2002 5:07:32 AM]

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You can''t, thats my point: Java replaces pointers by references and forbids you from doing pointer arithmatic. Hence the difference between pointers and references being more than just personal naming preference as you suggest.

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quote:
Original post by OrangyTang
You can''t, thats my point

That''s funny, "Pointers you can do pointer arithmatic on" sounds like the exact opposite of that.
quote:

Java replaces pointers by references and forbids you from doing pointer arithmatic.

Not quite. In Java terminology, there is a single concept which gets called both pointers and references by different people. I''m saying that the argument of what the concept should be called isn''t very useful.
quote:

Hence the difference between pointers and references being more than just personal naming preference as you suggest.

There is little semantic difference between pointer and reference - pointers are used to implement references. C++ is an curiosity in having separate syntactic constructs for pointer and reference. It''s a distinction which doesn''t exist in Java, and therefore the construct can equally be called either "pointer" or "reference". Which one to use has been the source of much boring debate.

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