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finding a spot in memory

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Hey ppl, Just wondering if there is anyway of finding where something is in memory. Example a textbox on a form. Is there anyway of finding the memory location of the said textbox or the value of. I am using vba for this also. Don''t know if it can be done but worth a shot. Cheers

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vba?

Visual Basic .. ?

If it is then...well....I don''t reallt know if this would work as I don''t know much VB...but I know there are lots of ways to do that in other Basic languages (QBasic being one of them)...look through the language docs...there might be a function that does exactly what you want, though doubtful).

C/C++ can only pass variables "by value"...which is why they have things like pointers...In Basic (and many other languages) variables can be passed "by value" and/or "by refrence"...in essence when you pass a function some text, you are really passing a pointer (refrence) to the memory location the text is stored at...the language itself takes care of the rest...again look through the language docs, Basic has lots of in-built library functions, which should allow you to do what you want.

I remember useing PEEK on the stack to find the memory location of arrays in Basic back in the Apple days...which might work

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quote:

DrPizza quote:
"Visual Basic .. ?"
for Applications.



Ah...thank you

How many different "flavors" of VB are there?

In 98'' I took a local college class titled "Advanced Visual Basic"...It had a prerec titled "Introduction to Visual Basic", but I was able to get my instructer in my "C" class to wave the requirement...after about six weeks I dropped the class, as it was supposedly "advanced" yet, we hadn''t even started covering arrays! I have nothing against the VB language (other then it creates some monseriously bloated apps), or even the people who use it...but I always wondered about that class, which seemed so much more like a intro to programing type class then what the title suggested...I shiver to think of what the real "Introduction to Visual Basic" covered

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