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xiaoken

Which compiler?

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I''m trying to learn C++, and I am wondering which compiler I should choose. I would like to get commercial ones as I assume its better then free ones, but on the other hand I still new to all this so I wonder if commerical compilers would be in itself a challenge to pick up. What was your first compiler choice(s)?

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quote:
Original post by xiaoken
I would like to get commercial ones as I assume its better then free ones


Some are, some definitely aren't.

quote:
but on the other hand I still new to all this so I wonder if commerical compilers would be in itself a challenge to pick up.


You still have to deal with the language, with how the compiler actually handles the language, and with the compiler bugs.

quote:
What was your first compiler choice(s)?


'Odin' - for Thomson MO5.

Oh, you said C++ - g++

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[edited by - Fruny on October 21, 2002 12:08:56 AM]

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If you''re using Windows, I recommend Dev-C++ (available from www.bloodshed.net). It seems fairly full-featured (it''s an IDE featuring the Mingw compiler), and although it''s not my favourite environment (I''m fond of my VC++ 6.0), it''s good and it''s free. (Compared to VC++ 6.0, it''s probably more standards compliant, too.)

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I would reccommend using one of the following compilers:

1. Microsoft Visual C++
2. Borland C++
3. DJGPP (haven''t figure out how to set this one up)


I would mostly recommend Microsoft Visual C++ but Borland is good too! Good luck!


Pod Buster

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Go Visual studio ONLY!!! For this very simple reason. You are programming windows, and who knows windows better than the ones who created it? Or for this even more important reason, 99% of ALL companies use it.

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Whatever you do dont use Visual C++ because it does not follow the standard convention in all cases. Learn it the right way then if you must, learn it the microsoft way.


Just my two cents.

"... thats the rub...

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Hahaha... I think both of the previous two posters are a bit overzealous in their advice (and, as usual, the anonymous poster has all the writing skill of a retarded badger).

Visual Studio has its pros and cons.

True, Microsoft made it. So what? Anyone with half a brain can understand and program for the Win32 API. And it isn't like they took the same people who made Windows and had them build Visual Studio. There are compilers that work better than the native one (Intel's compiler comes to mind) and IDEs that other people prefer more (Dev-CPP comes to mind, tho there is contention over that).

As for VS' infamous standards incompliance: eh. It is what I would call "pretty close". That is to say, going from Visual C++ to some other compiler will NOT be a major leap. You won't have to do extensive relearning.

In conclusion: Go with whatever you have access for. Decide whether you want to plunk down $100 for an academic version of VS, or go for the free Bloodshed/Dev-CPP system.


Don't listen to me. I've had too much coffee.

[edited by - sneftel on October 22, 2002 2:47:07 PM]

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Don't use Visual Studio. Here's what I got when I first started learning C/C++ using Visual C++:

ME: "Let's see what tutorial1.cpp does."
VC: "Do you want to create a default workspace?"
ME: "Workspace? What's that?" "No."
VC: does nothing....
ME: "Damn, let's do it again..."
VC: "Do you want to create a default workspace?"
ME: "OK, 'Yes' this time."
VC: runs the program. ends.
ME: "cool."
ME: after that. "Damn! what are all these stupid files doing here and messing up my tutorial folder? .dsw? what is this?"
ME: getting confused..."Does workspace has anything to do with C++?" "Why can't I just compile ONE file, and see what it does?" "Is C++ that complicated that it requires more than ONE file just for a 'Hello World'?" "Why are these people on the internet keep giving one .cpp file and tell me to compile it. They don't mention anything about workspace..."

ME: "Let's make a 'Hello World' of my own."
VC: start the dialog asking the project name.
ME: "Hm..since this is just a 'Hello World', I do not want a project. New File instead."
VC: displays an empty document.
ME: done coding. press the compile button.
VC: "Do you want to create a default workspace?"
ME: "Arrghh!!"

Yeah, very stupid, but that actually what was happened to me. I did learn C/C++ NOT from Visual Studio (I'm using it though), but from Borland Turbo C++ 1.01. It's FREE, easy to install (one installation file), and easy to use. Press compile, viola! A "Hello World" on the screen.

I tried DJGPP or the free Borland C++ 5.5 that time, but people told me: "OK, download this file, that file, this, that, this, that, unzipped them in the same directory, run this .exe, use /a /b /c /d /e commands"
ME: "damn...so..complicated...I just want to see 'Hello World'..."
even worse..
EXPERT: "RTFM."
ME: "RTFM? I don't understand a bit! What are those C++ jargons mean?? I just wanna see a 'Hello World' !!"

Then I heard about this IDE called RHIDE..but still "download this file, that file, this, that, this and that, unzipped them in the same directory" without those arguments though
I don't know if they have made a simpler version now, but that was what I got when I started.


My compiler generates one error message: "does not compile."

[edited by - nicho_tedja on October 22, 2002 4:29:41 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The retarded badger is back ;-) No, clue.. please.. Go look for a job and put Dev-CPP in your resume and see how far it helps you. No, job?? well, don''t be so surprised. Your point is lost in a blissfull abyss of ignorance. Most companies would prefer their would be employees to know the tools they use from the beginning no matter what you might think of it. Sorry, but this is the way it is.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
...put Dev-CPP in your resume and see how far it helps you...


I will not put Dev-CPP in my resume, or Visual Studio, or Borland C++. I would put "an RTS game of my own. Include in the CD."

quote:

Most companies would prefer their would be employees to know the tools they use from the beginning no matter what you might think of it



Agree on that. But I would never bother to apply for a PS2 game programmer position due to the fact that I''m a Windows (DX) programmer.



My compiler generates one error message: "does not compile."

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